286 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574411904

H

Naomi Scott University of North Texas Press PDF

GLOSSARY ing the people, animals, nature, and situations therein, emphasizing emotional, mental, social, physical, and spiritual well-being.

Frog (horse anatomy): Wedge-shaped substance in the sole of the hoof which acts as a cushion.

Gerontology: The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.

Hackamore: Circular device fitting around a horse’s muzzle, an alternative to a metal bit in his mouth, by which the rider communicates signals.

Half-halt: With a rider mounted, the horse is slowed almost to a stop, and then abruptly urged back to normal speed.

Harrington Rod Insertion: A procedure to stabilize the spine by fusing together two or more vertebrae, using either metal (Harrington) rods or bone grafts.

Hemispherectomy: Excision of one cerebral hemisphere, undertaken due to intractable (not adequately controlled by medication) epilepsy, and other cerebral conditions.

Hippotherapy: From the Greek word for horse, hippos, literally meaning therapy with the aid of a horse.

Infantile Spasms: Brief (typically one to five seconds) seizures occurring in clusters of two to one hundred at a time, with possibly dozens of episodes per day.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855758186

ACKNOWLEDGING RELATIONSHIPS WITH GRANDPARENTS

Susanne Soborg Christensen Karnac Books ePub

ACKNOWLEDGING RELATIONSHIPS WITH GRANDPARENTS

When we become parents, it is often quite natural that the grandparents move closer to a family with young children. This can be a great support, but many have probably also experienced how this can have a disturbing effect and cause conflicts.

There can be an imbalance between welcoming support and closeness and suffocating offers of help. The impact of any such lack of balance will depend on how much insecurity we carry with us in our baggage.

Often, the grandparents show a remarkable degree of tolerance and greater understanding of their grandchildren than they were able to show towards their own children. It can seem contradictory and even painful to see how our parents are capable of giving to our children all the things we longed for when we were children.

There will also be all the remarks and the “good advice” from grandparents to us as parents, which reminds us of scenarios we experienced as children and which we would prefer not to repeat and with which we disagree… you will regret going to her at the slightest cry… when you were children you were not allowed to dominate the conversation at the dinner table the way Agnete does … For many reasons, there will be lots of opportunities for disagreements about how to raise children.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574415247

Chapter 6. Playing

Kathryn U. Hulings University of North Texas Press PDF

Playing

The past few years, I have started to type a fan letter, but I always end

up hitting delete, even before I print it out to see how it reads on paper, to see if maybe my words look less creepy on an 8 × 10 sheet graced by sunlight than under the starkness of office lights and the glare of my computer screen.

I’m a middle-aged woman, and I swear that I’ve never written a fan letter to any celebrity. Never. Not to Oprah, not to Baryshnikov, not even to Treat Williams. I admit, I did wax poetic my adoration for

Bobby Sherman on a piece of construction paper spritzed with Love’s

Baby Soft perfume when I was eight years old, and I swooned over the life-size poster of his boyish frame that hung on my closet door. I never sent that red crayon confession of undying worship, though; I think I was unsatisfied with sending my innermost thoughts to a fan magazine and, unable to find Bobby’s personal address, I deep-sixed that loveletter in my flower-power trashcan.

Since that time, I have been consistently unimpressed with the juvenile antics, the self-obsessed posing, the ridiculous salaries, and the self-proclaimed-pseudo-political-expertise of the silver screen jet set.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855753693

CHAPTER ELEVEN. Motherhood and work

Alcira Mariam Alizade Karnac Books ePub

Herta E. Harsch

The full-scale arrival of women to the world of work was one of the greatest social changes of the last century. In the twenty-first century the conflict between motherhood and work will remain central in the lives of women. This article looks at this issue from a psychoanalytic point of view, elaborating on underlying unconscious processes. The first section discusses women confronted with the question of whether to work, bear a child, or both. The psychoanalytic theory of femininity is drawn upon to cast light on the conflict between motherhood and work. The second section of this paper examines the mother’s concerns about the potential effects of maternal absence and surrogate mothering on the mother-child relationship as well as the child’s development. The theoretical models drawn upon here include the concepts of primary maternal preoccupation and triangulation. The case material stems from the long-term psychoanalytic treatments of adults.

Job or child?

Public discussion regarding the compatibility of motherhood and work has been fuelled by the fact that the birth rate in Germany is one of the lowest in the world (along with those of Italy, Spain, and Greece). One-third of the women in Western Germany remain childless. For university graduates the childlessness rate approaches one-half. The birth rate dropped suddenly and dramatically between the mid-1960s and early 1970s, a period that saw the arrival of the pill, the feminist movement, and the first post-war economic crisis. This was the generation born after 1942; more men remained childless than women (as is still the case today). The early childhood of this generation coincided with the war and the post-war years. This suggests that there was little impetus for family life and the desire to have children that is unconsciously influenced by childhood experiences, particularly the early mother-child relationship.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855758186

THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF STORYTELLING

Susanne Soborg Christensen Karnac Books ePub

THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF STORYTELLING

The stories we tell or imagine about ourselves, our child, our partner, or family are always important. The reason for this is that whether we are young or old, our narratives of self contribute to the creation of understanding of ourselves. Our beliefs about the world and about ourselves are formed through stories. Stories help us to construct meaning in our lives and the events we witness. By increasing our understanding of self, and by exploring the events in our lives, our story about ourselves will develop and expand.

As we grow up, we are automatically constantly registering what goes on in ourselves and in others. This data constitutes the basis of the autobiographical story we all have in our baggage.

However, this multi-layered autobiography is not the definitive truth. It undergoes changes, and nuances occur as we explore it with our partner or significant others. When we do that, we add new layers to our autobiographical understanding, which makes it possible for us to change and to act differently.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411621

Family Tree

Donna S. Davenport University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781855758186

ACKNOWLEDGING INTIMACY IN OUR DAILY LIVES

Susanne Soborg Christensen Karnac Books ePub

ACKNOWLEDGING INTIMACY IN OUR DAILY LIVES

By now, it is no secret that to us that the recipe for a vibrant couple and family relationship is the acknowledging intimacy. In this chapter, we will take an in-depth look at what acknowledging intimacy is and what it means to live with or without this quality. Furthermore, we will focus on how we show acknowledging intimacy when we are with those we love.

Sharing acknowledging intimacy quite simply means that we are able to feel more authentically ourselves in an unambiguous way, and that we are able to be more aware of what goes on in the minds and souls of other people. For many reasons, we are not always equally ready to join in this “dance” with our children or partner. But don’t panic; nobody is able at any given time to offer a 100% intimacy or acknowledgement. That is the human condition!

Sharing acknowledging intimacy can happen automatically and unconsciously, but the point here is that we can also begin to be more intentional and conscious about showing acknowledging intimacy. It is not difficult to talk, write, and read about the importance of being present and close in relationships. What is much more difficult is to practise what we preach – especially so when the music is playing louder and we are feeling insecure.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855753693

CHAPTER TWO. The twenty-first century: what changes?

Alcira Mariam Alizade Karnac Books ePub

Giovanna Ambrosio

“God could not be everywhere and therefore he made mothers.”

Jewish proverb

Parthogenetic mothers: narcissism and omnipotence

For the purpose of suggesting and, above all, sharing some thoughts and queries about the prospects of maternity in the twenty-first century, I should like to consider the matter from the viewpoint of historic and social change, paying particular attention to the psychic aspects.

First, I should like to say that my position on problems related to one’s own body is that of respect for the principle of self-determination on the part of the subject, even more so since I live in a country where there is a troublesome tendency to legislate on many aspects of what is “private” and, even worse, in increasingly restrictive terms.

More specifically, I propose a brief reflection on the theme of maternity with reference to those particular clinical psycho-pathological situations of pathologies of the self and of narcissistic personality disorders. In fact, sometimes in these cases the fantasy of becoming a mother “at all costs” would seem to be mainly nourished by a system of needs belonging to the primary narcissism register and are completely remote from the possibility of acceding to recognition of the other and to the oedipal drive register.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411904

I

Naomi Scott University of North Texas Press PDF

GLOSSARY ing the people, animals, nature, and situations therein, emphasizing emotional, mental, social, physical, and spiritual well-being.

Frog (horse anatomy): Wedge-shaped substance in the sole of the hoof which acts as a cushion.

Gerontology: The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.

Hackamore: Circular device fitting around a horse’s muzzle, an alternative to a metal bit in his mouth, by which the rider communicates signals.

Half-halt: With a rider mounted, the horse is slowed almost to a stop, and then abruptly urged back to normal speed.

Harrington Rod Insertion: A procedure to stabilize the spine by fusing together two or more vertebrae, using either metal (Harrington) rods or bone grafts.

Hemispherectomy: Excision of one cerebral hemisphere, undertaken due to intractable (not adequately controlled by medication) epilepsy, and other cerebral conditions.

Hippotherapy: From the Greek word for horse, hippos, literally meaning therapy with the aid of a horse.

Infantile Spasms: Brief (typically one to five seconds) seizures occurring in clusters of two to one hundred at a time, with possibly dozens of episodes per day.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411904

Chapter 26: Ben—Infantile Seizures

Naomi Scott University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Twenty-Six

Ben—Infantile Seizures

Hemispherectomy. What a chilling word. Probably one most of us have not heard before. Yes, it means what it sounds like—removing onehalf of the brain.1 Imagine the heartbreak of being told your beautiful two-year-old son needed a hemispherectomy. This is what happened to the parents of Benjamen Schwalls, Michael and Michelle of Fort Worth,

Texas. After hearing of Ben’s dramatic surgery and recovery, I arranged to watch him ride while his father told me his story.

When Ben was about four months old, the Schwalls began noticing unusual body movement and his grandmother thought he might be having mild seizures. The pediatrician diagnosed reflux until two or three months later when the condition worsened and it became apparent that an Electroencephalogram (EEG) was necessary. The test confirmed the baby was having seizures.

“The diagnosis,” Michael Schwalls said, “was infantile spasms, a rare form of seizure. When the doctor gave us the bad news, he threw a lot of percentages at us about what to expect, indicating the disease would likely be debilitating, if not deadly. The cause was never determined, but we were told it was not genetic, therefore we need not be hesitant to have more children.” Schwalls recalled that the unusual activity started shortly after Ben received his second diptheria/pertussis/ tetanus (DPT) shot, but no official connection was made.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576754801

11: FORMING UNITY CIRCLES

Vargas, Roberto Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

There is tremendous power when people gather in a circle. The circle serves to create a synergistic environment where people feel more connected and are better able to share and listen. In addition, many healing traditions recognize that the circle serves to facilitate healing by creating a vessel in which the positive energy generated by the group’s sharing is enhanced, negative energy that participants may be carrying is dissipated, and the group’s energy facilitates individual transformation.

My vision for society includes that, on any given day, thousands of circles of family and friends are expressing love for each other, gratitude for life, and optimism that we are making the world better for all. It involves people coming together as family and community, and sharing feelings and thoughts with each other that deepen connection, empower, and inspire. The best strategy for doing this is the unity circle. Learning to appreciate the power of these circles and how to facilitate them will prepare you with a valuable tool for making almost any group gathering an opportunity for inspiration. This chapter presents a series of examples of unity circles to activate your imagination around their many possible forms and to illustrate the role of the circle maker. The chapter ends with a review of key principles to assist the facilitator.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781576754801

12: CREATING POWERFUL FAMILY AND COMMUNITY GATHERINGS

Vargas, Roberto Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Aprimary intention for this book is to provide tools for empowering our families and friends to serve our larger community as love in action, by committing to being family with each other while engaging in cultural and social change. Now that we have reviewed the essential tools of the Familia Approach for connecting, co-powering, facilitating family meetings, and creating experiences that inspire, I offer here several examples of how these tools can be used to support powerful family or community gatherings that aid us in becoming beloved community.

We repeatedly hear the adage that it takes a village to raise a child. This may work for many villages because all members feel responsible for the children in their community; that is the expectation that they hold for themselves and each other. How can we generate a similar feeling among family and friends today? One way is by developing the pact of being family with those we wish to be close with. The following example illustrates the tradition we are evolving to recognize and celebrate the commitment of becoming family in a way that nurtures increased community connectedness. While the strategy is grounded in our Chicano culture, it could be easily adapted to resonate with many other traditions.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411904

T

Naomi Scott University of North Texas Press PDF

GLOSSARY

Shedrow: A row of stalls in a horse barn, fronting on a covered walkway.

Spasticity: Increased tension of muscles when certain nerve signals are not sent by the brain, or are blocked from traveling to the spinal cord.

Spastic: Characterized by spasms. Hypertonic, meaning the muscles are rigid and the movements awkward. The more quickly a muscle is stretched, the stiffer it becomes.

Spatial Awareness: The ability to work within one’s own space, and to organize people and objects in relation to one’s own body. Indication of developmental lags include bumping into, spilling or being hit by things; backing away from moving objects; and short attention span.

Spatial Orientation: Our natural ability to maintain our body orientation and/or posture in relation to the surrounding environment, at rest and during motion. It depends on the brain’s effective perception, integration and interpretation of sensory information from visual, vestibular (inner ear), and proprioceptive (receptors located in the skin, muscles, tendons and joints) systems, and to a lesser degree, the auditory system.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574412697

Photos

Dan E. Burns University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781626564312

PART II From Peace to War

Arbinger Institute, The Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

“Did you hear that, Carol?” Lou said, chasing after her out to the parking lot. “That girl, Jenny—you know, the one who was yelling and carrying on this morning—she took off running.”

“Where?”

“Here, out in the streets. She just took off running across town.”

Carol stopped. “Oh, how terrible,” she said, looking up the street. “Poor girl. She wasn’t wearing any shoes. Do you think we should try to find her?”

“I’m sure Yusuf and his team are handling it,” he said.

Before now, Carol would have thought this a sarcastic dig, but she thought she heard a hint of respect in Lou’s voice.

Lou glanced at his watch. “Listen, Carol, I have to make some calls.”

“Now?”

“Yes. The situation at the office is kind of a mess. I have to check in with a couple of people.”

“Can’t you do that later?”

“They’ll probably be gone home by the time we’re out this evening. I’m going to have to call now.”

“You never worried about calling them at home on Friday nights before,” she said, coyly. “Why now?”

See All Chapters

Load more