601 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781607059974

Beautiful Bow-Tie Belt

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

easy peasy

Beautiful Bow-Tie Belt

What Do I Need?

⅜ yard of fun fabric

½ yard of featherweight fusible interfacing

2 D-rings (1˝)

Fun-colored sewing thread to coordinate with the fabric

Basic sewing supplies

special skills

Refer to The Rules of Sewing

Using an iron

If you are using a ¼˝ presser foot, don’t forget to use washi tape as a guide to make the correct seam allowance width for this project.

Prepare the Pieces

1.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 6˝ × 10˝ for the bow tie.

2.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 3˝ × 3½˝ for the center piece of the bow tie.

3.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 5˝ wide and your waist measurement plus 8˝ in length for the belt.

TIP

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 25. Make a SoulBox

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

HOLLY TOOK MY SOULBOX WORKSHOP AND FILLED HER BOX WITH MEANINGFUL IMAGES OF HER FAMILY. WHEN SHE WENT HOME, HER THREE KIDS COULDN’T WAIT TO MAKE BOXES OF THEIR OWN. THESE ARE THEIR CREATIONS. THIS IS A GREAT ACTIVITY TO SHARE WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY.

A SoulBox is a project I cooked up that lets you do a bit of soul archaeology and have fun while making a meaningful reminder of what is most important to you. It will remind you of your passion. You can use it as a resource when you need it. It is a special place for gathering meaningful things, words, and ideas. Essentially, it is a decorated box, filled with messages, images, and treasures (found or made).

IT WILL REMIND YOU OF YOUR PASSION.

A poignant episode of The Simpsons showed Marge Simpson in her bedroom. Her daughter, Lisa, was peering into her mom’s closet and noticed a box on a high shelf. She asked what it was. Marge replied, “Oh, that’s just my box of broken dreams.” She pulled it down and showed Lisa her old ballet shoes and remnants of a life she never pursued. I know you can relate to that. I did. Get out your box from the closet and open it up. The SoulBox is your answer to Marge’s box of broken dreams.

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Medium 9781617451867

Sunflower

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

sunflower

A single sunflower is framed by a simple pieced border in this fun-to-make fall quilt.

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

finished quilt: 24½˝ × 52½˝

materials

Brown: 1½ yards for appliqué background

Assorted golds: ½ yard total for sunflower center

Yellow: ⅔ yard for sunflower

Black: ¾ yard for pieced border

Assorted greens: 1 yard total for stem and leaf appliqués and pieced border

Paper-backed fusible web: 2 yards

Batting: 29˝ × 57˝

Backing and binding: 1¾ yards

cutting

Cut from brown:

1 rectangle 16½˝ × 44½˝

Cut from assorted golds:

148 squares 1½˝ × 1½˝

Cut from black:

68 rectangles 1½˝ × 2½˝

68 rectangles 1½˝ × 4½˝

Cut from assorted greens:

34 squares 2½˝ × 2½˝

appliquéing

Refer to Appliqué. Use the Sunflower patterns (pullout).

1. Cut 1 each of pattern pieces 1–6.

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Medium 9781617454820

Introduction

Riel Nason C&T Publishing ePub

introduction

I’m pretty sure some of the most difficult decisions of my childhood involved what to wear for Halloween.

Successful costume choices included the Queen of Hearts, an elephant, a mummy—and once, even a superhero! Or kind of. My mother made my shorts, shirt, cape, and hat from a gold patterned upholstery fabric. Blue felt trim was added, and red tights finished the outfit. I looked fabulous (or thought I did, anyway).

But oh, how hard it was every year to narrow all the possibilities down to just one. I had seemingly endless ideas. What figured into my decision-making process was not only what would be fun to wear, but what would be fun to make—to create. When I was young, my crafty mother brought my ideas to fruition and never disappointed me. As I got older, it was I who, even though I didn’t sew much, continued to gather, construct, draw, paint, glue, and otherwise assemble my costumes.

Now that I have children of my own, the innovation and improvisation haven’t stopped. They come up with the ideas, and I, often with their help, make the costumes. For example, when my son was four, he sure made a cute lighthouse.

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Medium 9781607054412

Broken Glass

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub
Medium 9781617450099

Chapter One: Let’s Mix It Up!

Kate Carlson Colleran C&T Publishing ePub

1

Let’s Mix It Up!

The Stash

As quilters, we all have a stash. We love our fabric! The big question is, Why don’t we use our stash? Well, there are as many reasons for that as there are quilters. But let’s explore a few of the common reasons.

1. You bought it a while ago and it just no longer floats your boat. Quilters are notoriously frugal—some of us even turn scraps into quilts! But that shelf of unwanted fabrics can really stymie our creativity. Looking at things like that makes us feel guilty because we bought it and now we don’t want to use it!

So, do something!

One idea would be to turn the fabric into a charity quilt—we have a couple of great patterns in the book that are not hard to do—why not use Wayne’s Quilt or Dance Party or and create a couple of quick charity quilts that anyone would adore sleeping under? Add a couple of extra borders to make the quilt bed size and use any extra fabric for the backing. (See Making Your Quilt Bigger by Adding Borders.)

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Medium 9781607053583

THROW: Alki

Emily Cier C&T Publishing PDF

Robert Kaufman

Letter Yardage Kona #–Color

1/2 yard

1123–Dresden Blue

M

1/4 yard

B

1/2 yard

1336–Slate

N

1

⁄3 yard

347–Artichoke

⁄8 yard

1029–Blue Bell

O

⁄3 yard

26–Canary

P

5

⁄8 yard

362–Dusty Blue

⁄8 yard

1072–Chartreuse

Q

5

⁄8 yard

1513–Sky

⁄3 yard

277–Blueberry

C

3

D

1

E

3

1/4 yard

80–Mulberry

F

1

⁄3 yard

1064–Caribbean

R

1

G

1

⁄3 yard

1482–School Bus

S

5

H

1/2 yard

165–Ivy

T

1

I

1/4 yard

1387–White

Binding

5

⁄8 yard

1706–Celery

⁄8 yard

1010–Baby Blue

⁄8 yard

1373–Teal Blue

⁄8 yard

1336–Slate

J

1

1484–Lupine

Backing 3 7⁄8 yards 1029–Blue Bell

K

1/4 yard

1263–Olive

Batting 68˝ × 68˝

L

1/4 yard

134–Thistle

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

alki

A

THROW

YARDAGE

Robert Kaufman

Letter Yardage Kona #–Color

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

2

4

3

4

5

4

11 11

6

13

2

First cut: Number of 11/2˝ × WOF strips to cut

10

8

7

6

7

6

5

8

4

Second cut

351/2˝

1

301/2˝

1

291/2˝

1

271/2˝

1

1

261/2˝

241/2˝

1

1

231/2˝

3

211/2˝

1

1

1

201/2˝

1

1

191/2˝

CUTTING

quilt top using the assembly diagram

(pages 38 and 39).

1

221/2˝

1

1

181/2˝

1

1

171/2˝

2

141/2˝

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

131/2˝

121/2˝

3

1

1

1

3

1

111/2˝

2

101/2˝

4

91/2˝

3

3

81/2˝

2

4

1

1

71/2˝

3

5

4

1

61/2˝

2

3

3

51/2˝

5

2

3

41/2˝

9

2

1

31/2˝

2

5

3

21/2˝

6

5

11/2˝

5

6

1

1

2

2

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

3

2

1

1

4

3

1

1

1

1

2

1

6

1

8

2

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Medium 9781935362593

Frustrations

Julia Icenogle Kansas City Star Quilts ePub

Even though Mrs. Bobbins loves to quilt, it does have its frustratingly funny moments.

“Shoot, I think I’ve quilted in the tablecloth again.”

“When you’re finished, I need you to shave this old quilt…it’s bearding, too.”

“The moths that eat my wool quilts get appliquéd over the holes they make.”

“I’m telling you, Edith, carpal-tunnel just proves that I deserve a big blue ribbon!”

“Here’s a little something to help my quilt get to the top of the queue…and no questions asked.”

Mrs. Bobbins learns the hard way always to buy extra fabric for the binding.

Overnight guests at the Bobbins’ may not be able to breathe, but they are never cold.

“It is a little bit late for Christmas peppermints. Let’s say they’re beach balls.”

A little microquilting goes a long… actually, it only goes a little way.

“I’ve been fighting this windmill so long I feel like Don Quixote.”

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Medium 9781571201478

Castle Weather

Claudia Olson C&T Publishing PDF

Castle Weather

Finished size: 74" x 74"

Blocks: Weathervane and Aircastle

When the two blocks are placed next to one another, their lines create a zigzag pattern and the shapes appear to fit like puzzle pieces.

Materials: 42"-wide fabric

White (includes binding)

Light navy

Medium teal

Medium purple

Light multicolor

Dark navy

Dark teal

Backing

Batting

Aircastle

41⁄ 4 yards

15⁄ 8 yards

1 yard

1⁄3 yard

11⁄4 yards

1 yard

5⁄ 8 yard

41⁄ 2 yards

78" x 78"

Cut the following 42"-long strips and pieces. Cutting sizes are given in inches.

vane

Weather

C U T T I N G C H A RT

Fabric

Number of strips

Size

WEATHERVANE BLOCK

White

Light navy

Medium teal

Medium purple

4

10

4

4

7

2

Light navy

Light multicolor

Size

Finished size: 12"

27⁄8

21⁄ 2

27⁄8

21 ⁄ 2

41 ⁄ 2

41 ⁄ 2

AIRCASTLE BLOCK

White

First Cut

Number

52

156

52

52

52

13

Make 13

27⁄8

27⁄8

x

21⁄ 2 x 21⁄ 2

27⁄8 x 27⁄8

21⁄ 2 x 21⁄ 2

41⁄ 2 x 41⁄ 2

41⁄ 2 x 41⁄ 2

Finished size 12"

6

2

3

2

2

3

27⁄8

51 ⁄ 4

21 ⁄ 2

27⁄8

41 ⁄ 2

47⁄8

72

12

48

24

12

24

Second Cut

Make 12

27⁄8 x 27⁄8

51⁄4 x 51⁄4

21⁄ 2 x 21⁄ 2

27⁄8 x 27⁄8

41⁄ 2 x 41⁄ 2

47⁄8 x 47⁄8

48 diagonally once

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Medium 9781617450150

Felt Medallion Necklace

Kirstyn Cogan Stash Books ePub

Felt Medallion Necklace

Finished Size: Felt pieces: ⅝˝–2˝; necklace strap: 12¼˝ long

Making these groovy felt medallions is a bit like eating chips—it’s hard to stop at one! They’re not only easy to make and wear, but they make great gifts and holiday ornaments, too!

Materials

Makes 6–10 necklaces.

Wool or wool-blend felt, 3 colors: 12˝ × 18˝ sheet or ⅛ yard of each color (I used white, green, and dark gray.)

Hemp or cotton cord, 20-pound weight: 1 yard for each necklace

Metal washers: various sizes from ⅜˝ to 2˝, allowing 1 or 2 per necklace

Spray adhesive and liquid glue

Fabric-marking pen, several colors (Always test on a scrap of fabric before using. I recommend using FriXion pens.)

Coordinating thread

Hand-sewing and large-eyed chenille needles

Hammer and nail (¼˝ head, just shy of ⅛˝ thick)

Scrap wood

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 16. Have a Secret

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

MY ALL-TIME FAVORITE ARTIST IS MY DEAR OLD FRIEND, BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA, ARTIST DOUG BAULOS. HIS IS AN ART OF SECRET KEEPING, MYSTERY, AND HUMANNESS. HE FINDS HIS WORK IN LAYERS. HE IS A POET—A SOUL MECHANIC. HE DOESN’T REVEAL ALL OF HIS HAND—EVER. YET HE REVEALS A LOT BY WHAT HE KEEPS UNKNOWN, BY WHAT HE DOESN’T SAY.

I was an eighteen-year-old freshman at the Rhode Island School of Design when I received the following homework assignment. My Two-Dimensional Design teacher, Jack Massey, asked us to do something very simple: have a secret.

This is what he told us to do:

Do something alone, just for you, by yourself, in the middle of nowhere, in a hidden place or out in the world—with no one else around. You can make a piece of art, do a performance or action, dance, write something, or make a site-specific installation. Whatever it is, it is your secret. Don’t tell anyone about it or talk about it—to anyone—ever.

That was ages before social media, before we advertised our every thought on Facebook, before we became increasingly entwined with externalizing our lives.

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Medium 9781607054863

Pick Up Sticks

Alissa Haight Carlton Stash Books ePub

80″ × 85″

Just two fabrics are used to make this graphic, eye-catching, double-size guilt.

The piecing of this guilt, like many others in this book, is not as involved as it looks. Many of the sections are the same, enabling you to piece long strips and then cut them into different portions and reassemble them with the remainder of the guilt top.

Based on 42″ fabric width.

Fabric A (blue): 4½ yards

Fabric B (yellow): 2½ yards

Backing: 4¾ yards

Binding: yard

Please be sure to read Notes on Making the Quilts in This Book (page 6). Label the pieces as you cut.

Note Pieces that are labeled with a “.1” indicate that they are initially cut with their counterparts and are then trimmed off later.

Fabric A (blue)

1. 1 strip 10½″ parallel to the selvage; cut A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5.

Make sure you fold your fabric carefully before you cut. Line up the selvage so you know it’s square and your strips will be nice and straight.

2. Cut 1 strip 25½″ parallel to the selvage; cut A8, A9, A10, and All.

3. From the remaining fabric from Step 2, cut A6, A7, and A12.

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Medium 9781607052708

Deco

Amy Walsh C&T Publishing ePub

by Amy Walsh, 78″ × 78″

FINISHED BLOCK: 6″ × 6″

FINISHED QUILT: 78″ × 78″

I came across this simple little pattern one day while tooling around the streets of I downtown Milwaukee with my sisters. This brick inlay was on the side of an old public school building we drove by. I of course immediately hauled out a napkin from the bottom of my purse and furiously began to sketch it out—an action that nets me no end of laughter from my loving siblings. And here it is, years later, as one of our favorite patterns. This quilt literally lends itself to any color palette that you may be hankering to work with. The bright blue squares can be subtle or contrasting—either looks smashing. Here is a perfect opportunity to haul out your stash and see what inspires you!

The following yardage makes a full-size quilt. Refer to the Deco chart (page 36) for alternate sizes and yardage requirements.

Assorted green, gray, and taupe batiks: 33 strips 6½″ × 42″ or 6¼ yards total

Blue or teal batik: 6 strips 2½″ × 42″ or ½ yard

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Medium 9781607059608

Spark 6. Make a Huge Mess

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

Every day when I pick up my daughter from preschool she is covered in remnants of her creative day, and I mean covered. She is dirty, sandy, gritty, painted, and stained. There’s sandwich on her face and sand in her pockets. Her shins are unrecognizably brownish-gray. I kneel down next to her, beaming, and say, “That’s what I like to see! I know you had a good day because you got messy!”

Do you honestly think I want that dirty child in my new car? Absolutely not! But I know I am being a really good mom in those moments because I am encouraging her creativity and validating her process and exploration. She can get in the bath later. Life is filled with opportunities, and if you are worried about getting dirty or making a mess, either metaphorically or for real, then you will be limited in your possibilities.

And so it is with grown-ups. You know you are on the right track if you are making a mess of something. You have to fall on your face sometimes. Who is your life for? Is it a big performance that you have rigged up with hidden strings and edited with Instagram-style filters to make you seem beautiful and perfect all the time? I did that for a long time. The years I Photoshopped my life into perfection and managed my image for some perceived gaze were some of the least creative of my life.

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Medium 9781607058861

Projects for children to make:

Salley Mavor C&T Publishing ePub

PROJECTS FOR CHILDREN TO MAKE

These projects are fun and easy for children to make. They are simplified adaptations of the wee folk and fairies featured in this book. Some children with sewing experience and fine dexterity can move to the more complicated wrapped versions of the dolls.

simple flower fairy

Flower Fairy, 2½˝ doll

Materials

Makes 1 doll. See Gathering Materials for more information on supplies.

Chenille stem 3mm in diameter

12mm unvarnished wooden bead for head

Acorn cap to fit bead head

Wool yarn for hair

Small piece of green felt for tunic

5 faux flower parts (rings of petals) for skirt

Pair of faux flower petals for wings

Colored pencils for facial features

16˝ length of size 3 perle cotton thread

Large-eyed needle

White glue

MAKE IT

Body

1. Bend the chenille stem in half (A).

2. Use the photo (below) as a guide to bend the toes (B), underarms (C), hands (D), and neck (E).

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