601 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781617450150

Go Fish Mobile

Kirstyn Cogan Stash Books ePub

Go Fish Mobile

Finished Size: Approximately 25˝ × 28˝

Watching fish swim is known to have a calming effect on a person’s mood, so let’s go fish! I list the lengths of the finished mobile strings just as a basic reference point. Don’t worry about matching the exact measurements of the sample. There are no hard-and-fast rules here…just have fun with it!

Materials

Quilting cotton: 2 fat eighths in coordinating colors

fast2fuse HEAVY double-sided fusible interfacing: 1 sheet

Coordinating thread

8½˝ × 11˝ copier/printer paper: 1 sheet

Fabric-marking pen (Always test on a scrap of fabric before using. I recommend FriXion pens.)

¼˝-diameter wooden dowel (4 lengths needed):

A: 1 piece 13˝

B: 1 piece 9˝

C: 1 piece 6½˝

D: 1 piece 5˝

Hand drill with 5/64˝ (0.078125˝) drill bit

12-pound fishing line

See All Chapters
Medium 9781935362593

World Events

Julia Icenogle Kansas City Star Quilts ePub

Mrs. Bobbins likes to keep up on what’s happening in the world, and sometimes a little quilt flair sneaks in!

“3 minutes, 23 seconds…and she’s on pace to shatter the Olympic record!”

Doing her part to stimulate the economy, Mrs. Bobbins engages in another wild night of online shopping.

“I’ll vote for any candidate that supports my right to carry a concealed seam ripper.”

The year the Quilt Guild was in charge of the Westridge precinct.

“YES, WE DID!”

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607059608

Spark 9. Grace

Carrie Bloomston Stash Books ePub

SUSAN SILVERMAN HAS DANCED HER WHOLE LIFE. SHE TEACHES AND

CO-OWNS A SMALL STUDIO IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA, CALLED DANCE THEATER WEST. SHE IS FILLED WITH GRACE. SHE’S IN IT FOR THE LOVE. GRACE IS THE HINGE BETWEEN EFFORT AND EFFORTLESS, AND IN THIS IMAGE YOU CAN SEE HER AT THAT EXACT MOMENT.

Grace comes from within; it is the hinge between effort and effortless.

We are programmed to think that work has to be hard to be valuable— that we are supposed to struggle in order to yield the most prized outcome. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, I would say that the opposite is true. Work can often be easy. Taking the path of least resistance will serve you. Doors swing wide on their hinges when we move from the heart. Creativity is a flowing thing. You can’t white-knuckle it into existence. Loosen your grip and give it some space to flow.

In yoga there is a name for this, from the very old yoga sutras of Patanjali (Yoga Sutra 2, “Sadhana Pada”)—Sthira Sukham Asanam is Sanskrit for “balancing ease and grace with work and effort.” This is absolutely critical for a creative practice. If we are only full of effort and we are trying to muscle and power our way through our work, our yoga, our project, then it will seem harder than it should. We might feel tense or uptight as we work.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607059974

Patterns

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

For all printable patterns or digital content: http://tinyurl.com/11092-patterns-download

For all printable patterns or digital content: http://tinyurl.com/11092-patterns-download

For all printable patterns or digital content: http://tinyurl.com/11092-patterns-download

For all printable patterns or digital content: http://tinyurl.com/11092-patterns-download

See All Chapters
Medium 9781571205797

Diagonal Rows

Terrie Sandelin C&T Publishing PDF

DIAGONAL ROWS

◆ FINISHED FOUNDATION:

7˝ × 8˝

◆ TIME:

3

HOURS

Fabric Requirements

Cream: ⁄ yard or scraps

Pale green: ⁄ yard or scraps

Light brown: ⁄ yard or scraps

Four dark browns: ⁄ yard or scraps of each

Dark brown inner border: ⁄ yard

Light to medium green outer border: ⁄ yard

Backing: 1 fat quarter

Binding: ⁄ yard

Cutting Instructions

Letters indicate fabric placement on the quilt layout diagram for the Pyramid

Triangle—Diagonal Rows variation, right.

Patches

You may want to add an extra ½˝–1˝ to each strip length for minor cutting adjustments.

Cut a 1½˝ × 2˝ rectangle for each patch. Use the Pyramid Triangle patch template on the pullout to trim the rectangles to size.

Cream (H, M): Cut a strip

1½˝ × 32˝. Crosscut into 16 patches.

Light brown (A, B, I, L, S, T):

Cut a strip 1½˝ × 44˝. Crosscut into

22 patches.

November Rain, 11¾˝ × 12¾˝, Terrie Sandelin, 2007

Dark brown (G, N): Cut a strip

1½˝ × 28˝. Crosscut into 14 patches.

Pale green (C, F, O, R): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 36˝. Crosscut into 18 patches.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781571205797

Diamond-on-a-Square

Terrie Sandelin C&T Publishing PDF

DIAMOND-ON-A-SQUARE

◆ FINISHED FOUNDATION:

6½˝ × 6½ ˝

◆ TIME:

HOURS

Fabric Requirements

Three dark browns: 1⁄8 yard or scraps of each

Two tans: 1⁄8 yard or scraps of each

Burgundy: 1⁄8 yard or scraps

Two medium browns: 1⁄8 yard or scraps of each

Light brown: 1⁄8 yard or scraps

Cream: 1⁄8 yard or scraps

Cream/beige: 1⁄8 yard or scraps

Dark brown inner border: 1⁄8 yard

Mountain Mist, 11¾˝ × 11¾˝, Terrie Sandelin, 2007

Medium brown outer border:

1

⁄4 yard

Backing: 1 fat quarter

Binding: 1⁄4 yard

Cutting Instructions

Letters indicate fabric placement on the quilt layout diagram for the 13-Square—

Diamond-on-a-Square variation, right.

Patches

You may want to add an extra ½˝–1˝ to each strip length for minor cutting adjustments.

Cut each patch 1˝ × 1˝.

Dark brown (A): Cut a strip 1˝ × 8˝.

Crosscut into 8 patches.

Tan (B, K): Cut a strip 1˝ × 28˝.

Crosscut into 28 patches.

Tan (C, Q): Cut a strip 1˝ × 17˝.

Crosscut into 17 patches.

Burgundy (D, L, P): Cut a strip

1˝ × 28˝. Crosscut into 28 patches.

B D E F G H L H G F E D B

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607059790

Nine-Patch Pocket Pillows

Heidi Staples Stash Books ePub

Nine-Patch
Pocket Pillows

DELUXE PINCUSHION SIZE: 5½˝ × 6½˝ with 4½˝ pocket

FIRST AID STATION SIZE: 16˝ × 16˝ with 10˝ pocket, plus 5¾˝ × 4½˝ zippered pouch and 6½˝ × 5˝ cold pack

BOOK NOOK SIZE: 26˝ × 26˝ with 20˝ pocket

This is a fairly simple project, but oh, the possibilities when you change the size and add a few accessories! Use similar construction methods but vary the size to make a pincushion, first aid station, or library cushion. A variety of Nine-Patch blocks enhance each project.

Deluxe Pincushion

5½˝ × 6½˝ with 4½˝ pocket

Make your pincushion work overtime by adding a pocket for embroidery scissors and sewing clips. A miniature Nine-Patch block is a great way to show off your favorite tiny prints.

FABRIC REQUIREMENTS AND CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

Making the Pincushion

Seam allowances are ¼˝ unless otherwise noted.

NINE-PATCH POCKET

1Arrange the 1½˝ squares into a 3 × 3 grid. Sew together to make a Nine-Patch block.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781571205797

Alternating Squares

Terrie Sandelin C&T Publishing PDF

ALTERNATING SQUARES

◆ FINISHED FOUNDATION:

7½˝ × 7½˝

◆ TIME:

3 HOURS

Fabric Requirements

Gold print: 1⁄8 yard

Green polka dot: 1⁄8 yard

Burgundy: 1⁄8 yard

Rust leaf print for inner border and foundation: 1⁄8 yard

Yellow outer border: 1⁄4 yard

Backing: 1 fat quarter

Binding: 1⁄4 yard

Cutting Instructions

There is no quilt layout diagram for this miniature because only four fabrics are used in two alternating blocks.

The strip width for the center squares is 19⁄16˝. Most rulers do not have 1⁄16˝ divisions.

Instead, line up the fabric halfway between the 1⁄2˝ and

5

⁄8˝ marks.

Center squares

You may want to add an extra 1 ⁄2˝–1˝ to each strip length for minor cutting adjustments.

Trim the tips off the corner squares using the Square-in-a-Square patch template on the pullout.

Rust leaf print: Cut a strip

19⁄16˝ × 205⁄16˝. Crosscut into

13 squares 19⁄16˝ × 19⁄16˝.

Gold print: Cut a strip 19⁄16˝ × 183⁄4˝.

Crosscut into 12 squares

19⁄16˝ × 19⁄16˝.

72

Miniatures in Minutes

Leaf Dance, 121⁄4˝ × 121⁄4˝, Terrie Sandelin, quilted by Vickie Bajtelsmit, 2007

See All Chapters
Medium 9781571206220

Zippy Strippy

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Mix and match a set of placemats for yourself or to give as a gift to someone special. There are six different designs to choose from. I used a variety of neutrals, which look stunning on a dark table. However, the placemats will look great no matter what palette you choose.

FINISHED PLACEMAT: 18½″ × 12½″

⅓ yard light print for center

⅛ yard light tan for inner border

¼ yard tan paisley for outer border

¾ yard for backing and binding

16″ × 22″ batting

Cut 1 rectangle 14½″ × 8½″ from the light print for the placemat center.

Cut from the light tan:

2 strips 1″ × 8½″ for the side inner borders

2 strips 1″ × 15½″ for the top and bottom inner borders

Cut from the tan paisley:

2 strips 2″ × 9½″ for the side outer borders

2 strips 2″ × 18½″ for the top and bottom outer borders

1. Sew the 2 side inner borders to the placemat. Press toward the borders.

2. Sew the top and bottom inner borders to the placemat. Press toward the borders.

3. Sew the 2 side outer borders to the placemat. Press toward the borders.

4. Sew the top and bottom outer borders to the placemat. Press toward the borders.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781611691450

My Quilt Story

Ann Loveless Kansas City Star Quilts ePub

My Quilt Story

Dune Birches

42" x 56"

I was born and raised in Frankfort, Michigan. I have been fascinated with sewing and textiles all my life. As a young girl, I made doll clothes, clothes for myself and friends and loved craft projects. My mother and grandmother sewed, and I had two neighbor women who also helped me with sewing projects. I completed nine years of 4-H sewing and had dreams of becoming a dress designer.

I attended Michigan State University and earned a Bachelor of Science in clothing and textiles. I also took numerous art and art history classes. After college, I became a seamstress in my hometown of Frankfort, creating a successful in-home business. I have always felt fortunate to be able to work at home and raise my three children.

After 25 years of seamstress work, I developed arthritis in my hands from overuse. The ripping of seams and working on heavy fabrics had gotten the best of me.

I did not want to stop sewing because it had been my passion all my life, so I turned to quilting. Working on lighter weight cottons did not bother my hands. Instead of ripping out, I covered mistakes with trees and thread! I had made several traditional bed quilts over the years and had taken a landscape quilt class using a McKenna Ryan pattern. I also had a stash of batik fabrics that I’d purchased over the years. I was not quite sure what I was going to do with them, but loved their “painterly” quality.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607053583

THROW: Zinnia

Emily Cier C&T Publishing PDF

Robert Kaufman

Letter Yardage Kona #–Color

1/4 yard

359–Pepper

K

1/4 yard

1237–Mocha

B

1/2 yard

147–Jungle

L

1

⁄3 yard

1042–Brick

C

3/4 yard

351–Green Tea

M

1

⁄3 yard

1370–Tangerine

D

5

⁄8 yard

1387–White

N

1/4 yard

1216–Maize

E

5

⁄8 yard

1145–Forest

O

1

1045–Brown

F

3

⁄8 yard

352–Ruby

P

1/4 yard

1089–Corn Yellow

Q

1

5

⁄3 yard

G

7

⁄8 yard

1295–Pomegranate

H

1

⁄3 yard

1465–Dusty Peach

Binding

1/2 yard

1308–Red

Backing 31/4 yards 351–Green Tea

149–Papaya

Batting 73˝ × 58˝

I

J

A

⁄8 yard

1

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

⁄3 yard

1082–Cocoa

⁄8 yard

1145–Forest

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

2

3

5

5

3

6

3

5

First cut: Number of 11/2˝ × WOF strips to cut

4

8

15 12 12

7

18

6

9

CUTTING

Second cut

1

221/2˝

1

181/2˝

1

171/2˝

1

151/2˝

1

141/2˝

1

1

131/2˝

2

5

1

1

111/2˝

1

2

101/2˝

5

1

91/2˝

2

3

1. Refer to One Strip at a

Time: A Pixel Quilting Primer

(pages 6–11) for assembly guidelines.

231/2˝

121/2˝

quilt assembly

2. Assemble the quilt top using the assembly diagram

(pages 50 and 51).

1

2

4

3

2

3. Layer, quilt, and bind

81/2˝

1

1

3

4

4

71/2˝

1

2

3

1

3

6

1

61/2˝

3

3

4

9

6

2

51/2˝

1

5

9

15

9

5

11

3

4

41/2˝

3

2

3

21

8

5

18

1

7

21 26

9

8

27 13

1

1

5

1

1

1

1

3

2

5

1

4

31/2˝

3

8

9

1

4

11

6

2

5

21/2˝

5

12 34 26 12 22 38 29 37

8

7

23 14

4

22 14 18

See All Chapters
Medium 9781617452697

Nonporous Substrates

Wen Redmond C&T Publishing ePub

Nonporous substrates deserve their own chapter because they can add dramatically different effects to your work and need special treatment. Pre-coats designed for nonporous surfaces enable you to use a variety of nonabsorbent metallic, plastic, and man-made materials, such as Tyvek, as substrates.

TYPES OF NONPOROUS SURFACES

Metallic surfaces used for printing have a wonderful glow and can be achieved using flexible tapes such as duct tape, flashing tape, or foil tape. Explore your local hardware store! Aluminum foil, shiny tea bag package liners, joss papers, and sequin waste are more metallic surfaces that can fit though your printer.

Other possibilities: Tyvek; thin plastics; assorted tape; and linings from tea, coffee, and other product packaging.

PRINTING ON NONPOROUS SUBSTRATES

All nonporous substrates need to be treated with a nonporous or iridescent pre-coat. These pre-coats are slightly adhesive and work well for printing slick surfaces. If the substrate curls after you apply the pre-coat, wait until it is dry and then press it under a large board or stack of books for a few hours. You can also press it with a warm iron using parchment or silicone release paper. If the substrate does not flatten completely, roll it in the opposite direction, in a loose cylinder, for a few minutes just before printing.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607054412

Interweave

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

finished block sizes: block a 6″ × 6″ block b 6″ × 4″ block c 6″ × 5″ | finished lap quilt: 60½″ × 82½″

A collection of bright pinks, yellows, and oranges surrounded by a light lattice and border gives this quilt a fresh, cheerful look.

•  3½ yards total assorted pinks, yellows, and oranges for pieced blocks

•  2¾ yards light for pieced blocks, lattice, and border

•  5 yards for backing and binding

•  65″ × 87″ batting

Cut a total of 420 rectangles 1½″ × 6½″ from assorted pinks, yellows, and oranges for pieced blocks.

Cut from light fabric:

•  112 rectangles 1½″ × 6½″ for pieced blocks

•  6 strips 2½″ × 76½″ for lattice

•  2 strips 3½″ × 76½″ for side borders

•  2 strips 3½″ × 60½″ for top and bottom borders

 

1. Piece Block A as shown. Press. Make 52 blocks.

Block A—Make 52.

2. Piece Block B as shown. Press. Make 45 blocks.

Block B—Make 45.

3. Piece Block C as shown. Press. Make 8 blocks.

Block C—Make 8.

1. Arrange and sew together the blocks in 7 vertical rows of 15 blocks each. Refer to Putting It All Together (at right) as needed. Press.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781571204462

Blooming Rectangles

Judy Sisneros C&T Publishing PDF

If you have a design wall with a

2˝ grid on it, the design process will be much easier. These can be purchased at quilt shops.

You’ll find that assembling the quilt will be easier if you follow the instructions step-by-step.

Fabric Requirements

(Yardage is based on 42˝-wide fabric.)

FLORAL FOCUS FABRIC: 2 yards for rectangles and outer border

GREEN: 11 ⁄ 4 yards for inner border, rectangles, and binding

RED: 1 yard for inner border and rectangles

FERN PRINT: 7 ⁄ 8 yard for rectangles

Cut 4 strips side-by-side.

FROM THE GREEN FABRIC, CUT:

3 strips 41 ⁄ 2 ˝ × wof

8 strips 21 ⁄ 2 ˝ × wof

1

BACKING: 3 ⁄ 4 yards

Subcut 2 strips into:

BATTING: 58˝ × 68˝

2 strips 21 ⁄ 2 ˝ × 241 ⁄ 2 ˝

FUSIBLE WEB: 1 ⁄ 2 yard, 18˝-wide

2 strips 21 ⁄ 2 ˝ × 141 ⁄ 2 ˝

Save the remaining 6 strips for the binding.

Cutting Instructions

(wof = width of fabric)

FROM THE FLORAL FOCUS FABRIC, CUT:

1 strip 20˝ × wof. Be sure to include the area you want featured in the large rectangle.

Subcut into:

1 large vertical rectangle 121 ⁄ 2 ˝ × 181 ⁄ 2 ˝

8 vertical strips 21 ⁄ 2 ˝ × 20˝. Cut these strips

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607058861

Chapter 15. Mary Had a Little Lamb

Salley Mavor C&T Publishing ePub

Mary had a little lamb with fleece as white as snow. It followed her to school one day. It made the children laugh and play to see a lamb at school.

For more specific directions, see these sections:

Basic Materials for Most Dolls

Faces, clothing, and accessories: See Making Wee Folk and Fairies.

Stitches

Doll Stand

Patterns

mary

Mary (3¾˝ doll)

Additional Materials

Makes 1 Mary doll.

1 sturdy 3¾˝ doll armature

1 unvarnished 20mm wooden bead for head

Wool/silk thread for hair

Cotton fabric for skirt

4mm-wide silk ribbon for hat

Seed beads for top, vest, and hat

1¼˝ flat metal washer for stand (optional)

DRESS IT

Skirt and Blouse

1. Follow the steps in Cotton Skirt to make Mary’s skirt.

2. Cut the pattern piece out of felt and embroider the blouse using a decorative blanket stitch.

See All Chapters

Load more