601 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781617452697

Paper as a Substrate

Wen Redmond C&T Publishing ePub

Printing on paper provides another tactile texture for digital artwork that you can use in art quilts, too. There are many papers that you can print on—some papers need to be prepared for inkjet printing (see Pre-Coats for Digital Printing), and some are fine without.

TIP

Coating papers with liquid or gel medium makes them more durable for sewing.

TYPES OF PAPER

You can use any number of high-quality fine-art papers, rag papers, watercolor papers, or archival papers. Or use simple inkjet prints, found papers, craft papers, tissue papers, old book pages, scanned documents, text, or old letters. My emphasis, and preferred method of working, is to experiment and try interesting papers for unique, original, and personal results. Almost any paper will work for printing a photograph on—plain, painted, or collaged.

Experiment, explore, and make test samples to see what works for you.

Assortment of paper

Image printed on plain inkjet paper

Image printed on recycled musical score

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Medium 9781571209580

Star of Bethlehem: Lazy Afternoon

Helen Frost C&T Publishing ePub

Quilt size: 82¾” × 82¾” • Cut strip widths: 2”, 1¾” • Finished diamond widths: 1½”, 1¼”

Machine pieced by Helen Frost. Machine quilted by Kris Neifeld, 2009.

Material

Fabric 1 is for the center and outer tips of the large star points. Fabric 9 is for the widest part of the large star points.

¼ yard of Fabric 1

5/8 yard of Fabric 2

½ yard of Fabric 3

1 yard of Fabric 4

5/8 yard of Fabric 5

1¼ yards of Fabric 6

1¼ yards of Fabric 7

11/8 yards of Fabric 8

1 yard of Fabric 9

1½ yards for background

½ yard for first border

1/3 yard for second border

2½ yards for third border

¾ yard for binding

7¾ yards for backing

Batting: 91” × 91”

Read pages 7–24 before starting. Refer back to those pages as needed when constructing the quilt.

Cutting

Fabric 1

Cut 1 strip 6” × width of fabric; subcut into 16 strips 2” × 6” for large star.

Fabric 2

Cut 1 strip 9” × width of fabric; subcut into 16 strips 2” × 9” for large star and 4 strips 1¾” × 5” for small star.

Cut 2 strips 5” × width of fabric; subcut into 44 strips 1¾” × 5” for small star.

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Medium 9781607054412

Moxie

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

finished block size: 10″ × 10″ | finished wall quilt: 50½″ × 50½″

Black-and-white prints are paired with bright oranges to create this stunningly graphic quilt. Not a fan of orange? Substitute red, lime green, teal, blue, or purple—you choose—to achieve the same graphic results.

•  2 yards total assorted black-and-white prints for pieced blocks

•  1¼ yards total assorted oranges for pieced blocks

•  3¼ yards for backing and binding

•  55″ × 55″ batting

Cut from assorted black-and-white prints for pieced blocks:

•  100 rectangles 2½″ × 3½″

•  100 rectangles 2½″ × 5½″

Cut 25 squares 6½″ × 6½″ from assorted oranges for pieced blocks.

 

Piece the blocks as shown. Press. Make 25 blocks.

1. Arrange and sew together the blocks in 5 rows of 5 blocks each. Refer to Putting It All Together (below) as needed. Press.

2. Sew together the rows to form the quilt top. Press.

1. Layer the quilt top with batting and backing. Baste or pin.

2. Quilt as desired and bind.

Putting It All Together

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Medium 9781617450426

Bonus: Variation for Jeans

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Refashion

Flared Pants to Skinny Pants

For years I have been transforming bootcut or flared dress pants into matchstick-straight pants. I found I could give old wardrobe staples a second life as flattering and fitted pants that are great for the office or more formal looks. This transformation will make the most out of shopping your closet for brand new pants.

Most trousers are easy to work with since their side seams don’t have topstitching to pick out. If you want to do this project with jeans, see Variation for Jeans.

You Will Need:

•Bootcut, wide-leg, or flared pants (or jeans)

•Standard sewing supplies

•Pinking shears (recommended)

•Fabric pen or chalk (optional)

Get It Done

Refer to Removing Stitches for guidance.

1. Turn the pants inside out and put them on. Place pins along the side seams to mark how fitted you want the legs to be. (Ask a friend to help pin if necessary.) Take equally from the front and back, keeping the old seam allowances centered and folded smoothly together.

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Medium 9781617450426

Take It In: Take In a Sweater or Knit Top

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Take It In

Take In a Sweater or Knit Top

This simple alteration project shows one of the most basic, but essential techniques I use. I often find sweaters are too boxy or shapeless, or that the waist is too high for my body. Adjust the side seams of these baggy sweaters with a few quick steps that make a huge difference. I’ve used this technique many times on cardigans, heavier-weight tees, and pullover sweaters to improve their fit.

You Will Need:

•Loose or shapeless tee or sweater

•Standard sewing supplies

•Fabric pen or chalk (optional)

Get It Done

1. Turn the sweater inside out and try it on. Pinch it in as desired at both side seams, approximately the same amount on each side. On one side, place several pins to mark where the narrowest point should be and where it should taper back to the original seam.

2. Press the sweater flat with an iron where you need to take in the seam. Move the pins if necessary to ensure that you capture an equal amount of fabric from the front and back sides and that the original seam is aligned along the side. Create a smooth line with the pins from the original side seam near the armpit to the narrowest point of the new waist, and down to the hip. Use a fabric pen if desired to connect the line between the pins.

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Medium 9781617450426

Take It Up: Shorten a Curved-Hem Shirt

Suzannah Hamlin Stanley Stash Books ePub

Take It Up

Shorten a Curved-Hem Shirt

Many button-down woven shirts have curved hemlines and very shallow hems, so the basic methods for hemming are difficult to apply. But once you know the tricks for curved hemlines, you can alter these flattering tops with finesse! This one was almost tunic length on me and I wanted a more traditional length.

You Will Need:

•Too-long button-down woven shirt

•Standard sewing supplies

Note

Since the shirt hem is on a curve, a narrower hem will be easier to sew and will lie flat more easily. The shirt shown here is lightweight, so I used a very small (¼˝ (6mm)) hem. If your fabric is heavier, you may need to turn up the hem slightly more to accommodate the fabric’s bulk. Try to re-create the depth of the original hem.

Get It Done

Refer to Removing Stitches for guidance.

1. Try on the shirt and mark the desired new length with pins, placing at least one pin at each side seam, center front, and center back. Take off the shirt, fold in half along the center front and center back, and pin together the left and right sides to keep them perfectly aligned.

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Medium 9781617450242

Drop

Cameli, Christina C&T Publishing ePub

  DROP

The drop shape is pointed at one end and curved at the other. It can be fat or skinny as needed. Sometimes the point of the drop will be left open. Sometimes a drop will bend to one side. Open drop shapes can be easily joined in a fan arrangement or a vertical column.

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Medium 9781611690477

Pineapple Crazy

Bonnie K. Hunter Kansas City Star Quilts ePub

Pineapple Crazy

QUILT SIZE: 80˝ x 90˝

BLOCK SIZE: 5˝

You know you are scrap-crazy when you have to STOP the vacuum from sucking up a small 2˝ triangle because it just might be the perfect piece for “somewhere.”‘ If you have been saving every string, scrap and crumb, this quilt is the “somewhere” for you! At least once in our lifetime, every quilter desires to do one Extreme Quilt. This was definitely one that was on my bucket list – and I enjoyed every scrappy moment of it! Number of pieces in my quilt? 12,000!

Fabric Requirements

5 yards assorted colored scraps and strings – clean out the small saved bits, and let’s use them!

5 yards assorted neutral/light scraps and strings – I’ve got everything from old calicoes to novelties with baseballs and everything in between.

2 yards solid red – enough for block and border accents and binding.

All the blocks in this quilt – the pineapple blocks, border triangle blocks, and the corner blocks – use foundation paper piecing in construction. All of the blocks finish at 5˝ making the quilt very easy to assemble.

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Medium 9781571205797

Alternating Squares

Terrie Sandelin C&T Publishing PDF

ALTERNATING SQUARES

◆ FINISHED FOUNDATION:

7½˝ × 7½˝

◆ TIME:

3 HOURS

Fabric Requirements

Gold print: 1⁄8 yard

Green polka dot: 1⁄8 yard

Burgundy: 1⁄8 yard

Rust leaf print for inner border and foundation: 1⁄8 yard

Yellow outer border: 1⁄4 yard

Backing: 1 fat quarter

Binding: 1⁄4 yard

Cutting Instructions

There is no quilt layout diagram for this miniature because only four fabrics are used in two alternating blocks.

The strip width for the center squares is 19⁄16˝. Most rulers do not have 1⁄16˝ divisions.

Instead, line up the fabric halfway between the 1⁄2˝ and

5

⁄8˝ marks.

Center squares

You may want to add an extra 1 ⁄2˝–1˝ to each strip length for minor cutting adjustments.

Trim the tips off the corner squares using the Square-in-a-Square patch template on the pullout.

Rust leaf print: Cut a strip

19⁄16˝ × 205⁄16˝. Crosscut into

13 squares 19⁄16˝ × 19⁄16˝.

Gold print: Cut a strip 19⁄16˝ × 183⁄4˝.

Crosscut into 12 squares

19⁄16˝ × 19⁄16˝.

72

Miniatures in Minutes

Leaf Dance, 121⁄4˝ × 121⁄4˝, Terrie Sandelin, quilted by Vickie Bajtelsmit, 2007

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Medium 9781571205797

Four Stars

Terrie Sandelin C&T Publishing PDF

Medium brown (B): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 32˝. Crosscut into

16 patches.

FOUR STARS

◆ FINISHED FOUNDATION:

7˝ × 8˝

◆ TIME:

3

HOURS

Dark brown (C): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 32˝. Crosscut into 16 patches.

Light blue (D): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 16˝. Crosscut into 8 patches.

Medium blue (E): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 14˝. Crosscut into 7 patches.

Dark blue (F): Cut a strip 1½˝ × 12˝. Crosscut into 6 patches.

Blue-black background: Cut strips 1½˝ wide for a total of 70˝ in length. Crosscut into 35 patches.

Medium blue inner border

Cut 2 strips ¾˝ × 7½˝.

Cut 2 strips ¾˝ × 9˝.

Blue-black outer border

Cut 2 strips 2¼˝ × 8˝.

Mardi Gras, 11¾˝ × 12¾˝, Terrie Sandelin, quilted by

Vickie Bajtelsmit, 2007

Cut 2 strips 2¼˝ × 12½˝.

1

2

A

C

A

C

B

B

D

F

3

4

5

6

7

A

D

F

D

F

D

F

D

F

E

E

E

E

C

A

C

D

F

A

C

A

C

E

E

B

A

C

A

C

B

A

C

A

B

B

C

Two dark blues: ⁄ yard or scraps of each

B

Four pinks: ⁄ yard or scraps of each

B

B

B

8

Fabric Requirements

A

A

C

D

A

C

D

B

B

E

C

A

C

Three medium blues: ⁄ yard or scraps of each

A

B

B

C

A

B

B

C

Quilt layout diagram for Pyramid Triangle foundation—Tumbling Blocks variation

Patch requirements: Cut rectangles 1½˝ × 2˝. Use template on the pullout to trim to size.

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Medium 9781607051985

Tequila Sunrise

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Lap Quilt

{This quilt glows with a spectacular show of color. Super simple appliqué shapes make this quilt a great choice for first-time appliqué.}

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

Finished block size: 5″ × 5″

Finished lap quilt: 66½″ × 86½″

5 yards total assorted brights for appliqué backgrounds and pieced outer border

3½ yards total assorted brights for appliqué pieces

¾ yard black for inner border

7½ yards paper-backed fusible web

5¼ yards for backing and binding

yard for binding if different from backing

71″ × 91″ batting

Cut from assorted brights: 192 squares 5½″ × 5½″ for appliqué backgrounds

Cut from assorted brights: 100 rectangles 1½″ × 3½″ for pieced outer border

Cut from black:

• 2 strips 2½″ × 80½″ for 2 side inner borders *

• 2 strips 2½″ × 64½″ for top and bottom inner borders *

* Cut 8 strips 2½″ × fabric width, piece the strips end to end (see Borders, page 6), and cut the border pieces.

1. Use the patterns (patterns are available to print from http://tinyurl.com/10780-patterns) to cut 192 each of pattern pieces 1 through 4. Note: The pattern pieces include the seam allowance for the outer edges of the block. Pieces 1–3 extend under Piece 4.

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Medium 9781607058861

Chapter 15. Mary Had a Little Lamb

Salley Mavor C&T Publishing ePub

Mary had a little lamb with fleece as white as snow. It followed her to school one day. It made the children laugh and play to see a lamb at school.

For more specific directions, see these sections:

Basic Materials for Most Dolls

Faces, clothing, and accessories: See Making Wee Folk and Fairies.

Stitches

Doll Stand

Patterns

mary

Mary (3¾˝ doll)

Additional Materials

Makes 1 Mary doll.

1 sturdy 3¾˝ doll armature

1 unvarnished 20mm wooden bead for head

Wool/silk thread for hair

Cotton fabric for skirt

4mm-wide silk ribbon for hat

Seed beads for top, vest, and hat

1¼˝ flat metal washer for stand (optional)

DRESS IT

Skirt and Blouse

1. Follow the steps in Cotton Skirt to make Mary’s skirt.

2. Cut the pattern piece out of felt and embroider the blouse using a decorative blanket stitch.

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Medium 9781607059790

Brass Ring Pillow

Heidi Staples Stash Books ePub

Brass Ring
Pillow

PILLOW SIZE: 18˝ × 18˝

BLOCK SIZE: 14˝ × 14˝

A traditional Wedding Ring block, also known as a Crown of Thorns block, looks surprisingly modern when transformed into a pillow made of low-volume prints or enlarged to make a lap quilt. “Going for the brass ring” is an old American saying that dates to the turn of the twentieth century, when carousel riders used to reach for brass rings as they straddled horses on the outer ring of the ride. Today the phrase refers to those who are willing to do their utmost to achieve their dreams. It’s a lovely thought to accompany a gift for someone special who may be embarking on a new life adventure.

Favorite scraps or charm squares (5˝ squares) can be put to use in this miniature version of the original block, embellished with an extra row of piecing on each side. Low-contrast prints and a tight color scheme make a quiet statement with big impact.

BUSY GIRL SPEAKS 

Angela Pingel of Cut to Pieces (cuttopieces.blogspot.com)

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Medium 9781607054412

Lap Quilts

Kim Schaefer C&T Publishing ePub

Quilted by Diane Minkley of Patched Works, Inc.

finished block size: 8″ × 8″ | finished lap quilt: 63½″ × 99½″

A collection of fun stripes was used to create this top. The solid fabric lattice strips break up the design and provide a grid for the pieced blocks. In each block, cool colors surround warm colors (and vice versa) to create a subtle secondary design. You’ll need to gather up equal amounts of warm- and cool-colored fabrics.

•  5 yards assorted stripes for pieced blocks and pieced border

•  1¾ yards black for lattice and borders

•  6 yards for backing and binding

•  68″ × 104″ batting

Cut 308 squares 4½″ × 4½″ from assorted stripes for pieced blocks and pieced border.

Cut from black:

•  50 rectangles 1½″ × 8½″ for vertical lattice

•  9 strips 1½″ × 53½″ for horizontal lattice

•  2 strips 1½″ × 89½″ for side inner borders

•  2 strips 1½″ × 55½″ for top and bottom inner borders

•  36 rectangles 1½″ × 4½″ for outer pieced border

 

1. Piece Block A as shown. Press. Make 16 blocks.

Block A—Make 16.

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Medium 9781607059974

Beautiful Bow-Tie Belt

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

easy peasy

Beautiful Bow-Tie Belt

What Do I Need?

⅜ yard of fun fabric

½ yard of featherweight fusible interfacing

2 D-rings (1˝)

Fun-colored sewing thread to coordinate with the fabric

Basic sewing supplies

special skills

Refer to The Rules of Sewing

Using an iron

If you are using a ¼˝ presser foot, don’t forget to use washi tape as a guide to make the correct seam allowance width for this project.

Prepare the Pieces

1.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 6˝ × 10˝ for the bow tie.

2.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 3˝ × 3½˝ for the center piece of the bow tie.

3.Cut 1 piece of fabric and 1 piece of interfacing to measure 5˝ wide and your waist measurement plus 8˝ in length for the belt.

TIP

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