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Medium 9789380386546

CH11-1

Gandharba Swain Laxmi Publications PDF

Chapter

11

USE CASE AND USE

CASE DIAGRAM

11.1 USE CASE

A

use case is a set of sequences of actions that performs an observable result to an actor.

Graphically a use case is represented by an ellipse. Every use case must have a name that distinguishes it from other use cases. The name can be simple name or path name. In path name the use case name must be prefixed by the name of the package in which that use case lives.

For example in ATM system, withdraw is a use case.

Tran sactio n ::

W ith d raw

W ith d raw

( a ) S im p le n a m e

( b ) P a th n am e

Fig.11.1 Simple name and path name

A use case name must be text consisting of number of letters, numbers, and punctuation marks except colon. In practice it should be a verb phrase. In Fig. 11.1(a) Withdraw is a simple name and in Fig.11.1(b), i.e., path name–Withdraw is the name and Transaction is the package name.

11.1.1 Use Case and Actor

An actor is a human being, or a h/w device or even another system that plays with our system. For example, in a banking system—Loan Officer and customer are actors. In a retail shop system—robot, sales men, shoppers are actors. Graphically an actor is represented by the following diagram, with a name below it, as shown in Fig. 11.2.

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Medium 9781601323262

Efficient Classification of Hyperspectral Images on Commodity GPUs using ELM-based Techniques

Hamid R. Arabnia, Lou D'Alotto, Hiroshi Ishii, Minoru Ito, Kazuki Joe, Hiroaki Nishikawa, Georgios Sirakoulis, William Spataro, Giuseppe A. Trunfio, George A. Gravvanis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Efficient Classification of Hyperspectral Images on Commodity

GPUs using ELM-based Techniques

Javier L´opez-Fandi˜no, Dora B. Heras, Francisco Arg¨uello

Abstract— Hyperspectral image processing algorithms are computationally very costly, which makes them good candidates for parallel and, specifically, GPU processing. Extreme

Learning Machine (ELM) is a recently proposed classification algorithm very suitable for its implementation on GPU platforms. In this paper we propose an efficient GPU implementation of an ELM-based classification strategy for hyperspectral images. ELM can be expressed in terms of matrix operations that can take maximum advantage of the GPU architecture.

Regarding the classification accuracy, the proposed algorithm achieves competitive results as compared to a traditional SVM strategy with significantly lower running times. Additionally, the use of a voting mechanism to improve the accuracy results is also considered.

Index Terms— Hyperspectral images, ELM, SVM, GPU,

CUDA.

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Medium 9781601323187

A Highly Available Generic Billing Architecture for Heterogenous Mobile Cloud Services

Hamid R. Arabnia, George A. Gravvanis, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Grid & Cloud Computing and Applications | GCA'14 |

A Highly Available Generic Billing Architecture for Heterogenous

Mobile Cloud Services

P. Harsh1 , K. Benz1 , I. Trajkovska2 , A. Edmonds1 , P. Comi3 , and T. Bohnert1

1 InIT Cloud Computing Lab, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Kanton of Zurich, Switzerland

2 Dpto. Ingeniería de Sistemas Telemáticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

3 Innovation & Research, Italtel S.p.A., Castelletto, Milan, Italy

Abstract— Rating, Charging, Billing (RCB) is the fundamental activity that enables a business to generate revenue stream depending on the resource consumption by their consumers. Traditionally, telecom operators have used custom designed, vertically integrated solution for RCB which often results in a complex system that is difficult to adapt to new service offerings. With telecom operator’s desire to capitalize on cloud computing by using their vast amount of infrastructure, the need for a RCB solution that serves the needs of cloudified telcos is needed.

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Medium 9781601322500

Train safety improvements using microwave networks

Hamid R. Arabnia, Victor A. Clincy, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Wireless Networks | ICWN'13 |

301

Train safety improvements using microwave networks

Pavel Rozsival, Jan Pidanic, Petr Dolezel, Pavel Bezousek

Department of Electrical engineering, University of Pardubice, Pardubice, Czech Republic pavel.rozsival@upce.cz

Abstract - Article describes use of radio network using

2.45GHz (ISM) frequencies for safety management and logistic in train transportation. Possible uses and expected properties of low cost network based on radio nod equipped train wagons are described. Design of such radio network based on NRF24L01 radios is outlined. This paper also describes testing scenarios for estimated parameter proofing.

At the end of the paper are presented results from testing dependency of movement on reliability of communication and first results from real scenario tests. Data shows that concept of placing low cost radios on wagons can be easily used in various situations like radio identification even in high speeds between train and ID reader.

Keywords: train; safety; RFID; NRF24l01

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Medium 9781601323200

Functions as Conditionally Discoverable Relational Database Tables

CSREA 2003 CSREA Press PDF

20

Int'l Conf. Artificial Intelligence | ICAI'14 |

Functions as Conditionally Discoverable Relational

Database Tables

A. Ondi and T. Hagan

Securboration, Inc., Melbourne, FL, USA

Abstract - It is beneficial for large enterprises to have an accurate and up-to-date picture of the status of the enterprise, yet the information, though available, is rarely accessible from one place and in a unified manner. The research presented here introduces conditionally discoverable relational database tables (CDTs) that present a subset of the information they contain via links to special input columns. Such CDTs can be used to present functions and web-methods in a unified relational manner, thus easing the burden on information discovery. CDTs can be used in conjunction with each other or with other traditional database tables via SQL SELECT queries.

Keywords: Conditionally discoverable table, Virtual table,

Relational database, Information discovery

1

Motivation

It is beneficial for large enterprises to have an accurate and up-to-date picture of the status of the enterprise, yet the information, though available, is rarely accessible from one place and in a unified manner. Having to know what piece of the big picture is located where hinders putting together a comprehensive overview.

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Medium 9781601323200

A Brownian Agent Approach for Modeling and Simulating the Population Dynamics of the Schistosomiasis

CSREA 2003 CSREA Press PDF

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Medium 9789381159682

Ch_3_F

Prof. Rachna Sharma and Prof. Sudipto Das Laxmi Publications PDF

Internetworking

63

3

INTERNETWORKING

Introduction

Networks connect devices and computers to one other thus enabling the sharing of resources.

Connecting these multiple devices so that there is one-to-one communication between them is always a hassle. Many topologies and designs exist by which this communication is made possible. There is the mesh topology wherein devices are connected point-to-point with each device being connected to every other device on the network.

There is also the star topology whereby every device on the network is connected to a central device, thus making the network look star-like. These methods have their advantages but seem impractical in large networks. The bus topology is impractical also as the number of devices and the distance between them will be so huge that the equipment and media used will not be able to support it.

When it comes to large networks, having links for a point-to-point connection would need a lot of infrastructure. Taking the number and length of links that would be required in a large network into consideration; you will realize that the network is not cost-efficient. Additionally, most of these links will not be used all the time.

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Medium 9781601323538

SESSION: Protein Classification, Structure Prediction, and Computational Structural Biology

Hamid R. Arabnia, Fernando G. Tinetti, Mary Yang CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. on Advances in Big Data Analytics | ABDA'16 |

SESSION

PROTEIN CLASSIFICATION, STRUCTURE

PREDICTION, AND COMPUTATIONAL

STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY

Chair(s)

TBA

ISBN: 1-60132-427-8, CSREA Press ©

1

2

Int'l Conf. on Advances in Big Data Analytics | ABDA'16 |

ISBN: 1-60132-427-8, CSREA Press ©

Int'l Conf. on Advances in Big Data Analytics | ABDA'16 |

3

Bidirectional Representation and Backpropagation Learning

Olaoluwa Adigun and Bart Kosko

Department of Electrical Engineering

Signal and Image Processing Institute

University of Southern California

Abstract— The backpropagation learning algorithm extends to bidirectional training of multilayer neural networks. The bidirectional operation gives a form of backward chaining or backward inference from a network output. We first prove that a fixed three-layer network of threshold neurons can exactly represent any finite permutation function and its inverse. The forward pass gives the function value. The backward pass through the same network gives the inverse value. We then derive and test a bidirectional version of the backpropagation algorithm that can learn bidirectional mappings or their approximations.

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Medium 9788131807026

Ch_6

Dr. V.N. Kala; Rajeshri Rana Laxmi Publications PDF

Chapter

6

LINEAR DEPENDENCE

OF VECTORS

6.1

ORDERED SET OF NUMBERS

Any two numbers x, y can be presented in two different ways : 1. first x and then y 2. first y and then x. Also this presentation can be represented as (x, y) or (y, x) depending upon the order of writing the two numbers x and y. This (x, y) is called as ordered pair here in (x, y) x is first member and y is second member.

In coordinate geometry, the ordered pair (x, y) denotes a point in plane. Similarly the ordered pair

(x, y, z) represents point in three dimensional space.

6.2

VECTORS : n DIMENSIONAL VECTOR

An ordered set of n-numbers (n tuple) which belong to field F say X = [x1, x2, ......, xn] is called n-dimensional vector over field F.

The numbers xi (1 £ i £ n) are called the components or coordinates of vector X. A vector over field of real numbers is called real numbers and that over field of complex numbers is called a complex vector.

This vector may be either a row vector or column vector. If A be a matrix of type m ´ n, then each row of A will be m vector. Any vector whose components are all zero, is called zero vector.

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Medium 9781601323125

Automated Electoral System in a Developing Country Democracy

Hamid R. Arabnia, George A. Gravvanis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

138

Int'l Conf. Scientific Computing | CSC'14 |

Automated Electoral System in a Developing Country

Democracy

Okonigene Robert1, Ojieabu Clement2, Samuel John3, and Agbator Austin4

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Abstract - In this paper we critically examined the feasibility, acceptability, conformity and the economic advantages in the application of our developed automated electoral system in line with democratic principles in a developing country like Nigeria. This automated system has already been presented in an earlier publication. In this system electoral irregularities have been reduced to the barest minimum. It was estimated that to fully implement this automated electoral system will cost USD $416m. Due to the huge cost involved in real live test a simulated automated system analyses were carried out. A total files size of 16 terabyte data, 140,000 laptops and accessories, 200 million people, 36 states, 6 geopolitical regions, 774 Local

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Medium 9789381159682

Blank Page

Prof. Rachna Sharma and Prof. Sudipto Das Laxmi Publications PDF

Building Applications

3

1

BUILDING APPLICATIONS

Introduction

While trying to understand how to design a network, we need to understand the different aspects related to the application currently being used by us. This also is largely dependent on the kinds of users making use of the network system. In order to effectively manage the design of a network, we would be viewing the concept of network architecture. We would also be discussing the measures, or metrics, used to evaluate the efficiency of computer networks.

1.1

APPLICATIONS

When we visit any web site, say http://www.laxmipublications.com/index, we first specify the

URL (Uniform Resource Locator) starting with http (Hyper Text transfer Protocol), which is used to download the page, with www.laxmipublications.com providing the machine name that serves the page and the particular page name (index), identifying the location on the machine to be accessed.

Once we click the URL, almost 17 messages may be exchanged over the Internet, including the page being considered as a single message. Of these, six messages will be used to translate the server name (www.laxmipublications.com) to its Internet address (say 192.35.167.10), next three messages being used to establish a TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) connection within the browser and server, following four messages for your browser to send an HTTP get message to the server and the server to reply with the requested page with acknowledgements from either side and the final four messages to terminate the connection.

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Medium 9781601323170

Web Programming Curriculum: What Changes, What Remains the Same Over Time

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

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Medium 9781601323293

Improve XML Web Services' Performance Using SOAP Compression

Hamid R. Arabnia, Leonidas Deligiannidis, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Semantic Web and Web Services | SWWS'14 |

15

Improve XML Web Services' Performance

Using SOAP Compression

Iehab Al Rassan and Haifa Alyahya

King Saud University, College of Computer and Information Sciences

Department of Computer Science

Abstract—Applications are part of our daily life that many people use it more than anything else. Nowadays, applications are connected via the internet and the users want to use fast and efficient services offered through the web services. Web services are the core of modern application architectures that will be used for many years. Regardless of what platform or language that developers are using, the critical skill understands how web services work. “Web services are the inseparable part of any web application, as a result enhancing performance of web services will have a great effect on the overall performance of the system”

[1]. Compressing and reducing the size of SOAP messages traveling over the network, improves the web services performance, which consumer invoke.

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Medium 9788131805220

ALLC-APP

Manish Goyal Laxmi Publications PDF

768

NUMERICAL METHODS AND STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES USING ‘C’

Table II-A

SIGNIFICANT VALUES OF THE VARIANCE RATIO

F-DISTRIBUTION (RIGHT TAIL AREAS)

5 PER CENT POINTS v1

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

161.40

18.51

10.13

7.71

6.61

199.50

19.00

9.55

6.94

5.79

215.70

19.16

9.28

6.59

5.41

6

7

8

9

10

5.99

5.59

5.32

5.12

4.96

5.14

4.74

4.46

4.26

4.10

11

12

13

14

15

4.84

4.75

4.67

4.60

4.54

16

17

18

19

20

4

12

24

5

6

8

224.60

19.25

9.12

6.39

5.19

230.20

19.30

9.01

6.26

5.05

234.00

19.35

8.94

6.16

4.95

238.90

19.37

8.84

6.04

4.82

4.76

4.35

4.07

3.865

3.71

4.53

4.12

3.84

3.63

3.48

4.39

3.97

3.69

3.48

3.33

4.28

3.87

3.58

3.37

3.22

4.15

3.73

3.44

3.23

3.07

4.00

3.57

3.28

3.07

2.91

3.84

3.41

3.12

2.90

2.74

3.67

3.23

2.93

2.71

2.54

3.98

3.88

3.80

3.74

3.68

3.59

4.49

3.41

3.34

3.29

3.365

3.26

3.18

3.11

3.06

3.20

3.11

3.02

2.96

2.90

3.09

3.00

2.92

2.85

2.79

2.95

2.85

2.77

2.70

2.64

2.79

2.69

2.60

2.53

2.48

2.61

2.50

2.42

2.35

2.29

2.40

2.30

2.21

2.13

2.07

4.49

4.45

4.41

4.38

4.35

3.63

3.59

3.55

3.52

3.49

3.24

3.20

3.16

3.13

3.10

3.01

2.96

2.93

2.90

2.87

2.85

2.81

2.77

2.74

2.71

2.74

2.70

2.66

2.63

2.60

2.59

2.55

2.51

2.48

2.45

2.42

2.38

2.34

2.31

2.28

2.24

2.19

2.15

2.11

2.08

2.01

1.96

1.92

1.88

1.84

21

22

23

24

25

4.32

4.30

4.28

4.26

4.24

3.47

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Medium 9788131805336

Power-16.pdf

Rajiv Parida Laxmi Publications PDF

Networking in C#

16

The concept networking refers to, the interconnection of more than one computer by the help of certain electronic media(cable, satellite, etc) in purpose of exchanging information or sharing resources.

Network communication in C# follows the same model as traditional languages do, but with fewer details for the user to manage. Socket programming can still be difficult, but wrapper classes facilitate common tasks. The System.Net namespaces are not technically part of the Base

Class Libraries, but I include them in this chapter because communication is so important today.

The framework and Windows support a number of protocols, but I focus on Internet Protocol

(IP) and sockets programming because most software engineer needing to communicate across the network will use IP-based technology.

The conversation-An Abstract Protocol

Client/server systems use many different protocols to communicate. Our challenge, in writing a protocol independent test, tool is to determine the features common to all protocols and write our test tool in terms of those features. By thinking about how protocols are put together in an abstract sense we can provide all of the facilities that any protocol could require. To anchor these abstract concepts in our design we need to name them.

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