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Medium 9781601323170

Session - Curriculum and Course Development + Related Issues

Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, and Fernando G. Tinetti CSREA Press PDF
Medium 9781601322494

Mobility Analysis Using MapReduce to Enhance Services Improvement for an University Smart Campus

Hamid R. Arabnia; Victor A. Clincy; Leonidas Deligiannidis; Ashu M. G. Solo; and Fernando G. Tinetti (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

28

Int'l Conf. Internet Computing and Big Data | ICOMP'13 |

Mobility Analysis Using MapReduce to Enhance Services

Improvement for an University Smart Campus

Laura Torres-López1 , Victor M. Larios-Rosillo1 , José G. Robledo-Hernández1 , and Ignacio Silva-Lepe2

1 PhD in IT, University of Guadalajara, Zapopan, JAL, México

2 IBM T.J. Watson R.C., Yorktown Heights, NY, U.S.A

Abstract— The analysis of urban mobility information lets us improve different services within a city. However, due to the interaction between different systems logically interconnected generating information on a daily basis, the very large volume of data collected brings challenges for the processing, visualization and simulation of data. Moreover the people through the use of mobile devices, act as a networked sensors collecting data that are convenient to analyze in order to get valuable information about real urban dynamics.

Trends on big data technologies have proposed the adoption of new programming models able to process the growing amount of information such as MapReduce, among others.

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Medium 9781601323279

From Air Conditioner to Data Breach

Kevin Daimi, Hamid R. Arabnia, Samiha Ayed, Michael R. Grimaila, Hanen Idoudi, George Markowsky, and Ashu M. G. Solo CSREA Press PDF

434

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'14 |

From Air Conditioner to Data Breach

G. Markowsky and L. Markowsky

School of Computing & Information Science, University of Maine, Orono, Maine, USA

Abstract— This paper examines the 2013 Target Data

Breach in detail with the intent of developing some lessons learned that can serve security educators. The Target Data

Breach originated in the network of a trusted vendor and then spread to Target’s network. The rush to put more objects on the Internet is introducing many vulnerabilities into networks, so Target’s experience of being attacked from a “trusted” source is likely to be repeated from many new sources. This paper then discusses the concept of a “kill chain” and how it could be of use to defenders. Finally, it discusses the relevance of the cyber castle metaphor to the design of hybrid networks and some approaches to building secure hybrid networks.

Keywords: Target Data Breach, Internet of Things, IoT, Cyber

Castle, hybrid network

1. Introduction

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Medium 9789351382669

4

Ajay Raj Parashar, Deepti Mittal Laxmi Publications PDF

Chapter

4

Authentication Applications

Kerberos

Kerberos is an authentication service developed as part of Project Athena at MIT. The problem that Kerberos addresses is this: Assume an open distributed environment in which users at workstations wish to access services on servers distributed throughout the network. We would like for servers to be able to restrict access to authorized users and to be able to authenticate requests for service. In this environment, a workstation cannot be trusted to identify its users correctly to network services.

Kerberos provides a centralized authentication server whose function is to authenticate users to servers and servers to users. Kerberos relies exclusively on symmetric encryption, making no use of public-key encryption. Two versions of Kerberos are in common use.

Version 4 implementations still exist. Version 5 corrects some of the security deficiencies of version 4 and has been issued as a proposed Internet Standard (RFC 1510).

MOTIVATION

If a set of users is provided with dedicated personal computers that have no network connections, then a user’s resources and files can be protected by physically securing each personal computer. When these users instead are served by a centralized time-sharing system, the time-sharing operating system must provide the security. The operating system can enforce access control policies based on user identity and use the logon procedure to identify users.

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Medium 9781601324146

Ad-Hoc Networks, MANET

Hamid R. Arabnia, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, Fernando G. Tinetti (Editors) CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Wireless Networks | ICWN'15 |

195

An Efficient Crowdsourcing Search Scheme in Vehicular Ad hoc Networks

Chyi-Ren Dow, Duc-Binh Nguyen, Zi-How Lin and Shiow-Fen Hwang

Department of Information Engineering and Computer Science

Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan

{crdow, p0395608, m012313, and sfhwang }@fcu.edu.tw

Abstract In recent years, Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks

(VANETs) have become a popular research field. In addition, conditions happened surrounding our life often have the demand to be supported by other people, and these conditions often occur on the road. This study proposes an efficient crowdsourcing search scheme in VANETs to search objects and collect data. Our proposed mechanism is based on the virtual backbone construction in VANETs. The regional data exchange can be limited, and the packet transmissions can be reduced. We have established coordinator and header mechanisms to manage the information of region nodes, reduce the amount of packet transmission and improve searching efficiency. Experimental results show that our schemes can effectively provide assistance in terms of search efficiency and satisfactory ratio.

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Medium 9781939902009

Chapter 6. The Directive in Detail

Christopher Hiller Bleeding Edge Press ePub

Directives live in the view. Directives are likely the hardest part of AngularJS to grasp, but also likely the most powerful. If you can understand how to write a directive, you can save yourself writing a lot of markup. Directives essentially extend HTML and you can use them to create your own DSL (domain-specific language).

Directives are not injectable.  There is no sane way to access the behavior of a directive, and if you feel you need to, you're doing it wrong.  They are meant to be put in the view and the view only.  Unlike filters, which mainly live in the view, there is no handy $directive service to grab one.  If you want one, you'll have to put it in some markup and compile and/or link your markup (which you can do programmatically via the $compile service, but let's not worry about that yet).  

We will start with a relatively trivial and useless directive, then provide more examples of different directive types, and some special directives that you'd use if you wanted certain behaviors; specifically custom form validation.

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Medium 9781601324122

Testing, Verification, Validation Methods + Security Analysis, Energy Efficient Software + Software Quality Issues

Hamid R. Arabnia, Leonidas Deligiannidis, George Jandieri, Ashu M. G. Solo, Fernando G. Tinetti (Editors) CSREA Press PDF

Int'l Conf. Software Eng. Research and Practice | SERP'15 |

57

Modelling the Energy Cost of Application Software for Developers

Fadwa Abdulhalim, Omar Alghamdi, and Kshirasagar Naik

Dept. of Electrical and Comp. Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L3G1

Abstract— In this paper, we present a non-exclusive test bench to measure the power consumption of an application running on a server. We provide a modelling procedure and tools to software developers to evaluate energy performance of their applications. A neural network model (NNM) has been trained based on process count information gathered by

CollectD and actual real-time power consumption monitored by a TED5000 power meter. By using measurement of an actual system running different workloads, power models for four subsystems (CPU, memory, disk and network interface) on two platforms (two real servers) are developed and validated. Through the use of this modeling procedure, a developer can estimate the system power consumption without the need of using an actual power meter device.

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Medium 9781601322586

Comparison of NoC Routing Algorithms Using Formal Methods

Hamid R. Arabnia; Hiroshi Ishii; Minoru Ito; Hiroaki Nishikawa; Fernando G. Tinetti; George A. Gravvanis; George Jandieri; and Ashu M. G. Solo (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

474

Int'l Conf. Par. and Dist. Proc. Tech. and Appl. | PDPTA'13 |

Comparison of NoC Routing Algorithms Using Formal

Methods

1

Z. Sharifi1, S. Mohammadi1, and M. Sirjani2

School of Electrical and computer engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

2

School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland

Abstract - Network on Chip (NoC) has emerged as a promising interconnection paradigm for complex on-chip communications. As fabrication cost is high, model based design of NoC and early exploration to make proper design decisions are important challenges in NoCs. To tackle these challenges, we use formal methods and utilize their expressivity and flexibility to model different behaviors of a

NoC and their abstraction to support early analysis of the design. We propose a formal approach for selection of the best routing algorithm in a NoC, according to its performance requirements. We present a model for two-dimensional mesh

NoC using actor based modeling language Rebeca. Both functional and timing behaviors are modeled. The model is then used to compare three routing algorithms XY, Odd-Even and DyAD with respect to the maximum end-to-end packet latency in different scenarios.

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Medium 9789381159668

Ch_4_F.pdf

M.Panda; M.R.Patra Laxmi Publications PDF

82 SOFT COMPUTING: CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES

4

GENETIC ALGORITHMS

4.1

INTRODUCTION

A genetic algorithms (or GA for short) can be stated as a programming technique that mimics biological evolution as a problem solving strategy. Given a specific problem to solve, the input to the GA is a set of potential solutions to that problem, encoded in some fashion, and a metric called a fitness function that allows each candidate to be quantitatively evaluated. These candidates may be solutions already known to work, with the aim of the GA being to improve them, but more often they are generated at random.

The G A then evaluates each candidate according to the fitness function. In a pool of randomly generated candidates; of course, most will not work at all, and these will be deleted. However, purely by chance, a few may hold promise-they may show activity, even if only weak and imperfect activity, toward solving the problem.

These promising candidates are kept and allowed to reproduce. Multiple copies are made of them, but the copies are not perfect, random changes are introduced during the copying process. There digital offspring then go on to the next generation, forming a new pool of candidate solutions, and are subjected to second round of fitness evaluation. Those candidate solutions which were worsened, or made no batter, by the changes to their code are again deleted, but again, purely by chance, the random variations introduced into the population may have improved some individuals, making them into better, more complete and more efficient solutions to the problem at hand.

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Medium 9781601322593

SSDP Covert Channel

Kevin Daimi; Hamid R. Arabnia; Michael R. Grimaila; Kathy Liszka; George Markowsky; and Ashu M. G. Solo (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

460

Int'l Conf. Security and Management | SAM'13 |

SSDP Covert Channel

Wesly Delva and Daryl Johnson

Department of Computing Security

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester, New York USA wxd5947@rit.eu, daryl.johnson@rit.edu

Abstract—A network covert channel provides a means of confidentiality with the intent to allow two nodes to communicate on a network with stealth. Simple Service Discovery Protocol is an Internet Protocol Suite that is capable of both discovering and advertising network services. This paper describes a method of using this discovery protocol as a means of sending covert messages between two nodes through steganography.

I. I NTRODUCTION

OK would contain the entity-header fields that correspond to the request.

The purpose of SSDP was to build a protocol so that computer users would have an easy, quick, and dynamic way to discover services or resources without any prior knowledge.

Therefore, SSDP only performs discovery and leaves any service description and/or negotiation to a higher layer servicespecific protocol [1].

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Medium 9781601322609

Simulation Software Generation using a Domain-Specific Language for Partial Differential Field Equations

Hamid R. Arabnia; Leonidas Deligiannidis; George Jandieri; Vince Schmidt; Ashu M. G. Solo; and Fernando G. Tinetti (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

Int'l Conf. Software Eng. Research and Practice | SERP'13 |

69

Simulation Software Generation using a Domain-Specific Language for

Partial Differential Field Equations

K.A. Hawick and D. P. Playne

Computer Science, Massey University, North Shore 102-904, Auckland, New Zealand email: {k.a.hawick, d.p.playne }@massey.ac.nz

Tel: +64 9 414 0800 Fax: +64 9 441 8181

April 2013

ABSTRACT

Domain-specific language techniques can considerably lower the software development effort and time required for problems in computational science and engineering. We describe our domain specific language for field-based partial differential equation simulations and show how it can address a whole family of such problems. Our system requires minimal effort to generate C++ software for a new equation model, but also dramatically lowers the effort needed to generate code in a different output language. We report on the lines of code for several example problems discuss software engineering implications of this automatic code generation approach.

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Medium 9781601322470

Potential Functions for Voting Dynamics

Hamid R. Arabnia; David de la Fuente; Elena B. Kozerenko; Peter M. LaMonica; Raymond A. Liuzzi; Todd Waskiewicz; George Jandieri; Ashu M. G. Solo; Ivan Nunes da Silva; Fernando G. Tinetti; and Fadi Thabtah (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

42

Int'l Conf. Artificial Intelligence | ICAI'13 |

Potential Functions for Voting Dynamics

Neelam Gohar1 and Paul W. Goldberg1

1 Department of Computer Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Abstract— Recent work in the AI literature has studied the properties of voting schemes for performing preference aggregation. An important technical issue that arises is manipulation of voting schemes: a voter may be able to improve the outcome (with respect to his own preferences) by reporting his preferences incorrectly. Meir et al. [11] have studied this phenomenon as a dynamic process in which voters may repeatedly alter their reported preferences until either no further manipulations are available, or else the system goes into a cycle. Here we show how potential functions are useful for showing convergence in variants of this setting, and for obtaining upper bounds on the convergence rate. We focus on plurality voting with weighted voters, and obtain bounds on the lengths of sequences of manipulations, that depend on which types of manipulation are allowed.

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Medium 9781601322586

Two-Phase Atomic Commitment Protocol in Asynchronous Distributed Systems with Crash Failure

Hamid R. Arabnia; Hiroshi Ishii; Minoru Ito; Hiroaki Nishikawa; Fernando G. Tinetti; George A. Gravvanis; George Jandieri; and Ashu M. G. Solo (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

30

Int'l Conf. Par. and Dist. Proc. Tech. and Appl. | PDPTA'13 |

Two-Phase Atomic Commitment Protocol in Asynchronous Distributed

Systems with Crash Failure

Yong-Hwan Cho, Sung-Hoon Park and Seon-Hyong Lee

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Chungbuk National Unvi. Cheongju

ChungBuk 361-763

E-mail: [yhcho,spark]@chungbuk.ac.kr

Abstract

This paper defines the Non-Blocking Atomic

Commitment problem in a message-passing asynchronous system and determines a failure detector to solve the problem. This failure detector, which we call the modal failure detector star, and which we denote by M*, is strictly weaker than the perfect failure detector P but strictly stronger than the eventually perfect failure detector ୚P. The paper shows that at any environment, the problem is solvable with M*.

1. Introduction

1.1 Background

We address the fault-tolerant Non-Blocking Atomic

Commitment problem, simply NB-AC, in an asynchronous distributed system where the communication between a pair of processes is by a message-passing primitive, channels are reliable and processes can fail by crashing. In distributed systems, to ensure transaction failure atomicity in a distributed system, an agreement problem must be solved among a set of participating processes. This problem, called the

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Medium 9781601322388

A Computational Model for Cultural Intelligence

Hamid R. Arabnia; George A. Gravvanis; George Jandieri; Ashu M. G. Solo; and Fernando G. Tinetti (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

228

Int'l Conf. Scientific Computing | CSC'13 |

A Computational Model for Cultural Intelligence

Zhao Xin Wu1, Li ZHOU2

1

Computer Science Department, University of Quebec in Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada

2

School of Electronic and Control Engineering, Chang'an University, Xi’an, P.R. China zhao_xin_wu@hotmail.com, 47599053@qq.com

Abstract - Computational model can be designed with soft computing technologies which are capable of reasoning and learning in an uncertain and imprecise environment.

However, in a real practical project, there are many difficult computational bottlenecks in need to break through when using these technologies. This research aims to invent a cultural intelligence computational model, which can process cultural intelligence soft data through the use of soft computing technologies. The purpose of this study is for individuals and organizations to solve the intercultural adaptation problems they may be faced with in a variety of authentic cross-cultural situations.

Keywords - Cultural Intelligence; Soft-Computing; Fuzzy

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Medium 9781601322470

Finding semantic correlation in structured data from unstructured notes

Hamid R. Arabnia; David de la Fuente; Elena B. Kozerenko; Peter M. LaMonica; Raymond A. Liuzzi; Todd Waskiewicz; George Jandieri; Ashu M. G. Solo; Ivan Nunes da Silva; Fernando G. Tinetti; and Fadi Thabtah (Editors) Mercury Learning and Information PDF

908

Int'l Conf. Artificial Intelligence | ICAI'13 |

Finding semantic correlation in structured data from unstructured notes

C. Anantaram, Shailja Khurana, Vuppala Gowri Dev

Tata Consultancy Services Limited, 249 D&E Udyog Vihar Phase IV, Gurgaon, Haryana, India

Abstract - In financial reports, sometimes, unstructured notes explain the nuances of the financial data described in structured form. The problem of interest here is to parse such unstructured notes and find the semantic correlation that it implies in the structured data. While techniques like Named

Entity Recognition have been used for extracting information from unstructured text, it has been observed that in order to discover meaningful semantic correlation in structured data, it is important to parse the unstructured notes in accordance with the terms and relations specified in the ontology of the domain. In this paper we examine this problem and present a mechanism to address the extraction of relations from unstructured notes and determine the semantic correlation of such relations with the structured data. Once such correlations are established, it becomes easier to understand the structured data, or have an automated question-answering system respond to user queries.

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