271 Slices
Medium 9780253357076

Conclusion: Food and Culture—Interconnections

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

FOOD AND CULTURE—INTERCONNECTIONS

I began my research in Hoi An thinking that the local foodways would merely reflect the existing social order and cultural arrangements, but my fieldwork frequently demonstrated that, on the contrary, the culinary sphere was not a passive mirror image of other social and cultural realms but, rather, an arena of cultural production itself.

A good example of the challenges to my early theoretical assumptions brought about by fieldwork observations would be the various modifications to the script of the Hoianese festive culinary scenario. While this scenario clearly reflects the prevailing social order and cultural conventions, the meaning of significant changes to that script—such as the addition of expensive seafood, or the buffet-style wedding feast—had to be more complex.

To engender a more accurate and sensitive analysis of the culinary events I witnessed in Hoi An, I turned to Handelman’s (1998) scheme of “Models, Mirrors and Re-presentations,” which better accommodates contradictions and incongruities such as the ones described above.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 19. BOMBERS AND BREAD BOWLS

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

19

R

unning

a

close

second

to

edible

utensils

as

my

favorite

things

in

the

world

are

ed-

ible

bowls.

And

this

dip

is

served

in

one.

I

used

to

go

to

a

local

place

called

BJ’s

when

I

was

in

college,

and

it

had

something

called

Bongo

Bongo

Dip

its

signature

creamy,

cheesy

arti-

choke

and

spinach

dip.

I

wanted

to

re-create

it

as

best

I

could,

and

I

think

this

version

is

even

better.

BJ’s

also

served

a

drink

called

the

BJ’s

Bomber.

It

came

in

a

giant

chalice

and

con-

tained

eleven

shots

of

various

alcohols

and

a

splash

of

a

sugary

fruit

juice

all

poured

over

ice.

That’s

all

for

one

person.

It

had

a

round

slice

of

orange

floating

on

top

of

it,

which

was

piled

with

sugar

and

set

ablaze

with

Bacardi

151.

And

as

if

eleven

shots

of

booze

weren’t

enough,

we

would

have

“Bomber

races”:

twelve

newly

21-year-old

jackasses

and

jackassettes

slurp-

ing

giant

red

drinks

through

straws

as

fast

as

we

could,

stopping

every

so

often

to

cringingly

stave

off

brain

freeze.

Winning

was

inconse-

quential,

as

we

were

all

shitfaced

within

eight

minutes.

I

swear,

I

did

go

to

class

in

college

.

.

.

and

I

actually

got

kind

of

decent

grades.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

I

thought

I

would

re-create

the

BJ’s

Bomber

to

go

with

this

menu,

but

then

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Medium 9781574414868

Cómo preparar los chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

 

COMO PREPARAR LOS CHILES

CHILE POBLANO • ASAR Y DESVENAR:

Tueste el chile poblano sobre la flama directa si tiene estufa de gas hasta que se ennegrezca por todos lados (si su estufa no es de gas ponga los chiles en una charola bajo el asador del horno ya caliente). Póngalos en una bolsa de plástico y déjelos sudar de 10 a 15 minutos. Quíteles la cutícula o piel tostada mojando sus dedos con agua si fuera necesario. En México es común ver que se pelen los chiles bajo el chorro del agua, ciertamente esto hace más fácil la tarea, aunque también se pierde algo del sabor. Tenga cuidado de no rasgar los chiles cuando los pele.

PARA LOS CHILES RELLENOS:

Haga un corte a lo largo de un lado del chile y quítele todas las semillas y venas con sus dedos (aquí se concentra el picante del chile por lo que debe limpiarlo completamente). No le quite el tallo.

*Siempre puede rellenar los chiles, o por lo menos asarlos y desvenarlos un día antes de servirlos.

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Medium 9781574415889

Pantry List

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

PANTRY LIST

Here’s your guide to what we use and what we have found that works after years of research and trial and error. The products and ingredients that contain gluten are mind-boggling. Do you have any idea how many ingredients have gluten in them? Who would have thought that some brands of corn chips contain gluten? Your favorite barbecue sauce? Spaghetti sauce? Ranch dressing? Salad dressing? Seasoning? Marinade? Soy sauce? Potato chips? Ice cream? Mustard? And on the ingredient label, gluten might be disguised in these as well: brown rice syrup, fillers, artificial flavors and natural flavors, seasonings and spice blends, stabilizers, starch, and some yeasts. There are times you just want to throw your hands in the air and say, “Just give me a banana.”

The new Food and Drug Administration rule about “gluten free” on labels is going to help a lot. With it, any food labeled “gluten free,” “without gluten,” “free of gluten” or “no gluten” will be limited to less than 20 ppm (parts per million) of gluten. The rule goes into effect in August 2014, and it’s in line with international standards.

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Medium 9781574410761

Appetizers

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Appetizers

21

Appetizers

The cocktail party has become the American way of turning everyone into a “Blithe Spirit.” How we do it depends entirely on the host—or hostess. Informality is its purpose, as munching on such oddments before or in place of a meal should keep conversation on the lighter and brighter things of the day.

Where to serve? Anywhere—the living room, the back porch, the kitchen; anywhere your guests or family choose to light.

If you are interested in its family tree, go to the Russian Zakouska.

Being a hearty race, before dinner the Russians gather around a sideboard in a room adjoining the dining room and partake of all kinds of special pastries, smoked fish and such, with much conversation and strong drink. The French Hors d’oeuvre, the Scandinavian

Smörgåsbord, the Italian Antipasto, all are offshoots of the Zakouska.

. . . I like to keep [the cocktail tidbit] as uncomplicated in flavor as possible, freshly made, cold and crisp—or hot—as the case may be. . . .

These few ideas, I think, will answer for all kinds of tastes, for the hostess who has time, or not much time; an unlimited budget, or just a few spare dimes. I think you should let guests pile as high and wide as they like, so very few of these ideas are to be spread on silly little squares of this and that by the hostess beforehand.

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