168 Chapters
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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the Blackland Prairies

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the Blackland

Prairies*

This area of about 12 million acres, while called a “prairie,” has much timber along the streams, including a variety of oaks, pecan, elm, bois d’arc, and mesquite. In its native state, it was largely a grassy plain—the first native grassland in the westward extension of the Southern Forest region.

Most of this fertile area has been cultivated, and only small acreages of grassland remain in original vegetation. In heavily grazed pastures, the tall bunchgrass has been replaced by buffalograss,

Texas grama, and other less productive grasses. Mesquite, lotebush, and other woody plants have invaded the grasslands.

The original grass vegetation includes big and little bluestem, indiangrass, switchgrass, sideoats grama, hairy grama, tall dropseed,

Texas wintergrass, and buffalograss. Non-grass vegetation is largely legumes and composites.

*Stephan L. Hatch, Texas Almanac, 2014–2015, Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor (Austin: Texas State Historical Association), 115. Used with permission of Texas State Historical Association.

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Medium 9780253357076

7 Rice Cakes and Candied Oranges: Culinary Symbolism in the Big Vietnamese Festivals

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

7    Rice Cakes and Candied Oranges

CULINARY SYMBOLISM IN THE BIG VIETNAMESE FESTIVALS

This chapter analyzes the special dishes prepared for the three most prominent festivals in Hoi An: Tet Nguyen Dan (Vietnamese New Year, henceforth, Tet), Tet Doan Ngo (Summer Festival), and Tet Trung Thu (Mid-Autumn Festival).1 The difference between the festive dishes examined so far and the ones I present below lies in the fact that the latter are consumed simultaneously by huge numbers of people—sometimes by most of the nearly one hundred million people in the country and beyond who consider themselves Vietnamese. Thus, the meanings of these festive dishes concern not only the Hoianese but, in some instances, the entire Vietnamese nation, within and beyond the country’s borders. These iconic dishes are Vietnamese “key symbols” (Ortner 1973) that are “the most important means by which the members of a group represent themselves to themselves …” (Solomon 1993: 117).

The dishes discussed in this chapter are key symbols also because they appear in multiple cultural contexts: their origins are the stuff of legends; they are prepared for domestic and commercial consumption; they are presented as offerings as well as eaten at various food events; and last but not least, they are often mentioned by the Hoianese. Following Solomon’s analysis of key symbols (1993: 120), these iconic dishes are not mere representations of the main features of being Hoianese/Vietnamese. They also offer nuanced insights into the meanings that the Hoianese/Vietnamese attribute to themselves, and delineate differentiation as much as solidarity. Indeed, these iconic culinary artifacts express localized and contemporary ideas that go well beyond their explicit depiction of the Grand National Narrative.

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Medium 9781574411362

Fort Worth

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

FORT WORTH

Fort Worth is considered the most typically Texan of all Texas cities. It is a city blended with cattle, oil, business and industry and the greatest of assets—a progressive and friendly citizenship. To the flutter of a flag and the notes of a bugle, Fort Worth was founded by Major Ripley A. Arnold on June 6, 1849. Before that eventful day, this region had had a history, much of it unrecorded. It was a lush and lovely land, with clear streams and blue skies. Game abounded and this was a favorite hunting ground of the Indians, therefore becoming the site of many bloody wars. General William J. Worth, commander of the United States military forces with headquarters in San Antonio, had instructed Arnold to establish a military post for the protection of settlers against the Indians. So Arnold named the post Camp Worth (later to be called Fort Worth) in honor of this gallant commander. Born in New York State in 1794, Worth entered the Army as a private and rose to the rank of major general. He fought in the War of 1812 and played a leading part in the Florida-Indian War, bringing about peace with the Seminoles. In the War with Mexico, Worth displayed great gallantry in the taking of Monterey and aided in the storming of Chapultepec and the capture of Mexico City. He was buried in New York City, and a monument stands at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. The greatest monument to the brave soldier, however, is the great city which bears his name. Great herds of long-horns were driven from Texas to the railheads in Kansas. Fort Worth was on the main route, sometimes called the Chisholm Trail. The lowing herds camped near the town, and cowboys galloped in firing their pistols into the air and even rode their horses into the saloons—Fort Worth is still referred to as Cowtown. “Wild and woolly” characterized much of Fort Worth’s life in the 1880’s. Most celebrated of six-gun exponents was long-haired James Courtright, who could shoot equally well with either hand and was a master of the “border shift,” wherein a pistol was drawn, fired, tossed in the air, caught in the other hand and fired again.

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Medium 9781574410761

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

You can judge the amount of butterfat in cheese by its firmness; hard cheese has less. Never heat no-fat cheese; the gum arabic used in it does just what its name implies.

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Medium 9781574414929

This and That

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

This and That

There are always snippets of information left over at the end of every project of this size. Corbitt combined these and placed them at the backs of all but her last cookbook. It proved popular with earlier readers, so I am availing myself of the same opportunity. In an effort to make your hours in the kitchen more effective, here are hints my mother and friends, fine cooks all, have passed along to me. I’ve added a few of my own picked up during a gastronomically satisfying half-century spent in my own kitchens.—Editor

If you don’t own a rolling pin, use a chilled cylindrical bottle of wine to roll pastry.

Something always needs to be grated: chilled citrus fruit is easier to grate. The extra flavor of freshly grated nutmeg and Parmesan cheese make it worth your effort. Either can be grated easily in a hand-held Zyliss or on a Japanese fresh ginger grater. Hard cheeses are easier to grate when they’re at room temperature.

Cream cheese is always worked at room temperature.

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Medium 9782067181977

ACROSS THE BORDER: THE CANTON OF TICINO AND ISTRIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

ACROSS THE BORDER: THE CANTON OF TICINO AND ISTRIA

A small excursion outside Italy to two areas that, in their character, display a certain cultural and artistic continuity with the Bel Paese. As far as the enological panorama is concerned, they show steady growth and are characterized by increased attention to quality production and involve wine tourists in activities to discover the territories.

Lario Tus/SHUTTERSTOCK

The Canton of Ticino

VITICULTURE IN THE CANTON

The Canton of Ticino is divided into two principal areas, Sopraceneri and Sottoceneri – respectively north and south of Monte Ceneri pass – covering eight districts: Bellinzona, Blenio, Riviera, Leventina, Locarno, Vallemaggia, in Sopraceneri; Lugano and Mendrisio in Sottoceneri. All of these areas have vineyards to some extent.

The climate, which is mostly sunny, is marked by abundant precipitation at certain times of the year. The terrain is mostly granite and gneiss and is fairly acidic. Because of pedoclimatic conditions, the best-adapted system for cultivation has proved to be the Guyot system. Because of the frequency of hail, particularly in Mendrisiotto and Malcantone, the vines are protected by anti-hail nets.

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Medium 9782067181977

VENETO

Michelin Michelin ePub

VENETO

Viticulture in Veneto is closely linked to the region’s history: the wine “de Venegia” was known since the Middle Ages not only in the Italian peninsula, but also beyond its borders, thanks to the far-reaching trade practised by the Serenissima Republic of Venice. It is not surprising, therefore, that wine is an integral part of the culture and daily life of the Veneto. As the goal of local vintners is to make wines of the highest quality, it is not surprising that Venetan production is remarkable not only for its volume (the region is one of the largest producers in Italy) but also for its excellence. The number of designated areas that Veneto boasts also puts the region in the high end of the table, attesting the importance viticulture has in the life of the population and in the regional economy.

Vineyards in the Verona countryside

Fauxware/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Archaeological finds in the Lessini mountains confirm the close bond the Veneto has with the vine. It is perhaps due to this millenary tradition that the region has such a diverse and rich range of varieties of both white and black grapes.

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Medium 9780253357076

6 Food and Identity in Community Festivals

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

6    Food and Identity in Community Festivals

Community festivals in Hoi An are celebrated by social groups larger than the household (nha) or the extended family (gia dinh), but the actual number of the participants does not exceed several hundred. Participants in community festivals know each other personally, at least to a certain extent.

I have opted to present four feasts that represent the wide range of communities in town: the meal served at the Tran clan ancestor worship ceremony, the Protestant church’s Christmas picnic, the Cao Dai annual communal feast, and the banquet prepared for the Phuoc Kien Chinese community festival. Just as in life-cycle events, community festivals consist of two parts: a formal, ritual stage and a feast. Here too, much of the preparation, effort, cost, and time are invested in the festive meal.

While the eating arrangements at community festivals are remarkably similar to those defined by the family-oriented “festive culinary scenario,” the dishes and menus are diverse, with each communal meal featuring a specific set of dishes that distinguishes it from the others and imbues it with particular meanings. The menus and dishes mainly concern the collective identity of each community, or, rather, the complex, multileveled and often contradictory identity of each group, as well as their positioning within Hoi An, the nation, and beyond.

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Medium 9781574411362

All Outdoors

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

ALL OUTDOORS

The Bill Kuykendall ranch is indeed one of the prettiest spots in Hays County. Alice and Bill Kuykendall live in the long rambling ranch house which rises naturally out of the green land!

Bill also rises high and naturally out of the land—he would perish I’m sure if he ever tried to live away from it and the Great Out of Doors. His innate knowledge of nature is extensive and diversified. I would say that he is an authority on birds and bees, certainly, but also grass, wildflowers, cattle, horses, polo, hunting—as the rare trophies in his game room prove—fishing, wild game, gardening and camping, and quite expert in outdoor cooking. He is one outdoorsman who could live well with only a rifle, lasso or fishing rod. Some of the food Bill cooks outdoors may seem a little dramatic to some of us—like the calf’s head he cooks underground; or barbecuing mountain oysters; or frying fish down by Onion Creek—but to Bill it’s an everyday-occurrence sort of thing and he does it with a minimum amount of effort and much to the delight of his company, whether they be ranch hands or CITY SLICKERS!

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Medium 9781574414868

Tabla de conversión métrica

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

CONVERSIÓN MÉTRICA

MEDIDAS DE VOLUMEN (en seco - harina)

1/4 de taza= 35 g

1/3 de taza = 47 g

1/2 taza = 70 g

3/4 de taza = 105 g

1 taza = 140 g

MEDIDAS DE VOLUMEN (en seco - azúcar)

1/4 de taza= 48 g

1/3 de taza = 63 g

1/2 taza = 95 g

3/4 de taza = 143 g

1 taza = 190 g

MEDIDAS DE VOLUMEN (líquidos)

4 onzas (1/2 taza) = 120 ml

8 onzas (1 taza) = 240 ml

16 onzas (2 tazas) = 480 ml

32 onzas = 960 ml = .96 litros

PESOS (masa)

1 onza = 30 g

3 onzas = 90 g

4 onzas = 120 g

8 onzas = 240 g

10 onzas = 285 g

12 onzas = 340 g

16 onzas = 1 libra = 454 g

DIMENSIONES

1/4 de pulgada = 6 mm

1/2 pulgada = 1.25 cm

3/4 de pulgada = 2 cm

1 pulgada = 2.5 cm

TEMPERATURAS/HORNO

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Medium 9782067181977

LAZIO

Michelin Michelin ePub

LAZIO

Lazio is one of Italy’s top wine-producing regions. The zones that are most suited to viticulture are the hills of volcanic origin, whose soil, composed of lava and tufa, provides high-quality nourishment to the vines. Back in the times of the Romans the Castelli Romani hill area was already used to grow grapes, and the wines they produced were sought after in the banquets and festivities of Rome’s leading citizens. White wines are more prevalent but there are also interesting reds, like those made from Cesanese grapes.

The countryside between Rieti and Terni

Claudio Giovanni Colombo/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Historically a white wine producer, most of Lazio’s viticulture is concentrated in the Castelli Romani and the provinces of Viterbo, Frosinone and Latina. The most commonly grown white-skinned grapes are Trebbiano, Malvasia, Bellone, Bombino Bianco, Grechetto and Moscato di Terracina. The most widespread black-skinned grapes, on the other hand, are Cesanese, Ciliegiolo, Sangiovese, Montepulciano, Cabernet and Merlot. Today Lazio can boast 27 DOC zones of which one, Moscato di Terracina, was only recently established.

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Medium 9781574415889

Breads

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

BREADS

Bread is so elemental to life that it really was hard to imagine living without it. We’ve eaten some lousy gluten-free breads, and a cheeseburger on a corn tortilla is, well, a cheeseburger on a corn tortilla. No more. We love bread. No longer will you have to go without sandwiches, biscuits, your favorite Thanksgiving dressing, blueberry crumb muffins, cheese biscuits, pumpkin walnut bread, or buttermilk pancakes. They’re all here. Kim’s the baker and she adores pizza. Her last meal would be pizza. Our recipe for Pizza Crust is crispy and divine. You would never guess it’s gluten-free. Our recipes are creative and comforting, and they don’t taste like the side of a milk carton.

Remember, recipes that call for flour, bleached white flour, whole wheat, cracked wheat, barley, semolina, spelt, faro, kamut, triticale, or vital wheat gluten are not gluten-free. Don’t even think about eating those ingredients. Also remember that prepackaged bread crumbs, croutons, flour tortillas, pizza crust, piecrust, pretzels, wraps, pita bread, crackers, flatbread, and muffins are not gluten-free unless labeled as such. Our recipes really do allow you not only to maintain a gluten-free diet, but to enjoy it. We offer you one of the most important gifts in a gluten-free life: extraordinarily good-tasting gluten-free breads.

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Medium 9781574410761

Beverages

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

Beverages

45

HOT CHOCOLATE

For 20

⅔ cup cocoa

¾ cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup water

3 quarts scalded milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup cream, whipped

[Ground cinnamon (optional)]

Mix cocoa, sugar, salt and water. Add to the scalded milk and beat with a rotary or wire whip. Return to heat and bring to a boil.

Remove; add vanilla and pour into warm cups. Put a teaspoon of whipped cream on top. A touch of cinnamon in the cream for grownups who indulge.

Eggnog is as personal as you make it. This one is mine. I remember the first time I made it, for the Houston Country Club Woman’s Golf

Association Christmas party. They were sure a Yankee couldn’t, but afterwards this recipe was always used.

EGGNOG

For 30

24 eggs, separated

2 cups sugar

1 quart bourbon

1 pint brandy

1 quart heavy cream

2 quarts milk

1 quart vanilla ice cream

Nutmeg

Beat the egg yolks and sugar until thick. Add the bourbon and brandy and stir thoroughly. . . . Add the cream and milk and continue whipping. Break up the ice cream and add. Beat the egg whites until stiff and fold in. Refrigerate if possible for 30 minutes before serving.

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Medium 9781574414929

Cheese and Eggs

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Cheese and Eggs

In the sixteenth century a Bishop of Paris was authorized by a bull from Pope Julius III to permit the use of eggs during Lent. The Parliament took offense and prevented the execution of the mandate. From this severe abstinence from eggs during Lent arose the custom of having a great number of them blessed on Easter Eve, to be distributed among friends on Easter Sunday.

SWISS CHEESE SOUFFLÉ

For 8 to 10

[If you plan to serve this with Oriental Chicken [page 134], use American (Cheddar) cheese rather than Swiss and add 1/4 teaspoon of White Wine Worcestershire sauce.]

1/2 cup butter

6 tablespoons flour

2 cups milk

2 cups grated Swiss cheese

8 eggs, separated [at room temperature]

1-1/2 teaspoons dry mustard or 1 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon salt

Parmesan cheese (may be omitted)

[Preheat oven to 350°.] Melt the butter, add the flour and cook slowly until mixture foams. Do not brown. [Gradually] add the milk, [stirring constantly], and bring to a boil; use low heat to ensure the flour and milk being thoroughly cooked. The sauce should be smooth and thick. Remove from heat. Add the [Swiss] cheese and stir until blended. Cool slightly. Beat the egg yolks and add to the mixture. Add the mustard, cayenne and salt. Let mixture cool until you can place your hand on the bottom of the container without feeling any heat. Beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry. (Tip the bowl and if the whites do not slide out, they are ready.) Stir gently about one third of the egg whites into the mixture, then fold in remaining egg whites until well distributed. Pour into a 2-1/2- or 3-quart buttered soufflé dish sprinkled lightly with Parmesan cheese or into two 1-1/2- quart ones. Bake for 30 minutes if you are going to eat at once, or place in a pan of hot water and bake 1 hour, and it will hold awhile.

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Medium 9781574411362

The LBJ Ranch

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

THE LBJ RANCH

One person who has changed the least through the years is Lady Bird Johnson. I can remember when Lyndon Johnson was still in Congress and Lady Bird invited Olga Bredt, Bess Jones, Mary Love Bailey and me to come up to the ranch for lunch.

The LBJ ranch house is spacious, and it has a beautiful setting under huge live oak trees by the Pedernales River, but it really isn’t a mansion as most people think of that word “mansion.” The Johnsons built it for comfort and a heap of living, adding onto and modernizing the old stone part, that was sighing and sagging when they bought the place from Mr. Johnson’s aunt (Mrs. Clarence Martin) in 1951. The living rooms, which have large wood-burning fireplaces, get plenty of use, but the actual center of the house, I think, is the kitchen, just as it is in all ranch homes. For many years, while Mr. Johnson was senator, the standard procedure for dispatching outgoing mail was to put it by the Mixmaster near the kitchen door. Then the first person going to town picked the letters up and took them to the post office. The system worked just fine.

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