168 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574411362

All Outdoors

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

ALL OUTDOORS

The Bill Kuykendall ranch is indeed one of the prettiest spots in Hays County. Alice and Bill Kuykendall live in the long rambling ranch house which rises naturally out of the green land!

Bill also rises high and naturally out of the land—he would perish I’m sure if he ever tried to live away from it and the Great Out of Doors. His innate knowledge of nature is extensive and diversified. I would say that he is an authority on birds and bees, certainly, but also grass, wildflowers, cattle, horses, polo, hunting—as the rare trophies in his game room prove—fishing, wild game, gardening and camping, and quite expert in outdoor cooking. He is one outdoorsman who could live well with only a rifle, lasso or fishing rod. Some of the food Bill cooks outdoors may seem a little dramatic to some of us—like the calf’s head he cooks underground; or barbecuing mountain oysters; or frying fish down by Onion Creek—but to Bill it’s an everyday-occurrence sort of thing and he does it with a minimum amount of effort and much to the delight of his company, whether they be ranch hands or CITY SLICKERS!

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Medium 9781574414929

Vegetables and Cooked Fruits

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Vegetables and Cooked Fruits

One could spend a lifetime expounding on the vegetable kingdom. Personally, I like to cook vegetables just underdone; the “dressing up” that follows finishes the cooking. I find vegetables take on a blissful state if they are made “interesting.” These recipes are my most popular and flavorsome attention-getters, especially with the male half of the hungry horde.

Just a foreword: In selecting your fresh vegetables you should look for, first, clean vegetables, free from decay or bruised spots. Generally speaking, depend on your eyes rather than your fingers in judging vegetables. After you get them home, wash well, pare or shell, as the case may be, but never soak in water as vitamins and minerals will be lost.

Somewhere back in the days of the early Romans, recipe books advised cooks to add a dash of soda to green vegetables to keep them green, and unfortunately some people still think it necessary. It detracts from the flavor, changes the texture, and goodness knows what happens to the vitamins. Generally speaking, again, vegetables cooked in a small amount of water uncovered, turn out better, both in looks and taste—so don’t make vegetable cooking complicated.

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Medium 9781574415889

Desserts

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

DESSERTS

Life is too short. Eat dessert first. The end of the meal is Kim’s favorite time: sitting around the table with a cup of freshly brewed coffee and sharing a grand-finale dessert with family or friends.

Previously, gluten-free desserts were like eating raw corn grits with sugar baked on them, then set out in the sun for a couple of days and, of course, freeze-dried for a couple of months. They were dry as concrete, tasteless, and so different from regular desserts.

Finally, we have gluten-free desserts that are simple to make and so incredibly rich and moist they melt in your mouth.

Gluten-free flours, while opening the door to divine gluten-free desserts, are more challenging to bake with than traditional white flour. Figuring out the exact measurements for rice, potato, or corn flour can get very complicated because you cannot just substitute one cup of gluten-free flour for one cup of traditional wheat flour. Moreover, gluten-free flours do not rise like wheat flours; indeed, they tend to flop. Kim has spent many hours covered in gluten-free flour to perfect these recipes that we are pleased to offer. They are shockingly moist. And they’re so good, you’ll forget they’re gluten-free.

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Medium 9782067181977

VENETO

Michelin Michelin ePub

VENETO

Viticulture in Veneto is closely linked to the region’s history: the wine “de Venegia” was known since the Middle Ages not only in the Italian peninsula, but also beyond its borders, thanks to the far-reaching trade practised by the Serenissima Republic of Venice. It is not surprising, therefore, that wine is an integral part of the culture and daily life of the Veneto. As the goal of local vintners is to make wines of the highest quality, it is not surprising that Venetan production is remarkable not only for its volume (the region is one of the largest producers in Italy) but also for its excellence. The number of designated areas that Veneto boasts also puts the region in the high end of the table, attesting the importance viticulture has in the life of the population and in the regional economy.

Vineyards in the Verona countryside

Fauxware/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Archaeological finds in the Lessini mountains confirm the close bond the Veneto has with the vine. It is perhaps due to this millenary tradition that the region has such a diverse and rich range of varieties of both white and black grapes.

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Medium 9781574410761

Desserts

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

294

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

Reader’s Request

What is easier or more gracious than serving Pots de Crème for dessert in the living room with coffee after dinner. The crème pots are available all over the country in china shops—so invest! Good too for holding vitamin pills, cocktail picks or whatever.

POTS DE CRÈME

For 8 except someone always wants two

3 cups half-and-half

9 egg yolks

¾ cup white sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

1½ teaspoons vanilla

Light brown sugar

[Preheat oven to 325°.] Heat the half-and-half. Beat egg yolks with sugar and salt. Beat in the hot half-and-half gradually with a French whip. Add vanilla. Strain and pour into pots de crème cups. Cover the pots and put in a pan of hot water 1-inch deep. Bake for 30 minutes or until a knife when inserted comes out clean. Remove pots and chill. Place a teaspoon of brown sugar on top of each dessert and run under the broiler to melt; cover and serve.

Use the same recipe but change the flavoring: omit the brown sugar

(brulée). Add 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate to the hot milk for Pots de Crème au Chocolat.

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Medium 9782067181977

PUGLIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

PUGLIA

Continuous trading relationships with different civilisations, particularly from the Middle East, ensured that this region accumulated a substrate of different customs, cultures and traditions, resulting in a set of unique characteristics. And in its viticulture, too, Puglia was different, cultivating a huge range of grape varieties, many of which were clearly from the East, such as Aleatico, Malvasia, Uva di Troia and Moscato, but prevalently cultivars representative of the region itself, like Negroamaro, Primitivo, Notar Domenico, Susumaniello, Ottavianello, Bianco d’Alessano, Pampanuto and Impigno. Today, after years in which quantity was always considered more important than quality, things are seen differently and Puglian wine is undergoing consistent improvement.

The lovely town of Locorotondo has a DOC zone named after it

REGIONE PUGLIA ASSESSORATO TURISMO E INDUSTRIA ALBERGHIERA

The terroir

In terms of the quantity of wine Puglia produces, it is one of the top regions in Italy, but in terms of image it has to cope with the fact that for a long time its wines were considered second class, and indeed much of its must and wines has not been bottled in the region but sold to strengthen the structure and colour of wines of other regions or countries. However, efforts to upgrade Puglia’s winemaking have brought some very interesting results.

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Medium 9781574414868

Cómo preparar los chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

 

COMO PREPARAR LOS CHILES

CHILE POBLANO • ASAR Y DESVENAR:

Tueste el chile poblano sobre la flama directa si tiene estufa de gas hasta que se ennegrezca por todos lados (si su estufa no es de gas ponga los chiles en una charola bajo el asador del horno ya caliente). Póngalos en una bolsa de plástico y déjelos sudar de 10 a 15 minutos. Quíteles la cutícula o piel tostada mojando sus dedos con agua si fuera necesario. En México es común ver que se pelen los chiles bajo el chorro del agua, ciertamente esto hace más fácil la tarea, aunque también se pierde algo del sabor. Tenga cuidado de no rasgar los chiles cuando los pele.

PARA LOS CHILES RELLENOS:

Haga un corte a lo largo de un lado del chile y quítele todas las semillas y venas con sus dedos (aquí se concentra el picante del chile por lo que debe limpiarlo completamente). No le quite el tallo.

*Siempre puede rellenar los chiles, o por lo menos asarlos y desvenarlos un día antes de servirlos.

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Medium 9782067181977

UMBRIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

UMBRIA

Umbria is a marvellously verdant region of mountains, hills, woods, lakes and rivers. Umbrian wines were renowned as early as the Middle Ages, and continue to be today. There is a great variety of native varieties, including Grechetto, Verdello, Drupeggio, Procanico, Verdicchio and Malvasia Bianca, among the white grapes, and Sagrantino, Sangiovese and Ciliegiolo for the blacks. Of these the Sagrantino has garnered the most attention from experts and wine lovers as it produces remarkable wines that age well. To complement the native vines, several varieties have been imported, such as Tocai, Traminer, Chardonnay, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.

Vines growing within sight of Orvieto

Gianni Fantauzzi/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Although Umbria can boast many interesting wines, the most representative are Torgiano Rosso, Sagrantino and Orvieto. The first, which falls within the appellations Torgiano Rosso DOC and Torgiano Rosso Riserva DOCG, is made from Sangiovese and Lanaiolo grapes grown on the hills of Torgiano municipality in the province of Perugia. It is a full-bodied wine with intense fragrances of ripe fruit, jam and spices.

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Medium 9782067181977

CALABRIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

CALABRIA

A combination of almost nothing but mountains and coastline, Calabria is a region of enormous beauty that greatly repays the effort invested to explore its geography and gastronomy. Called Enotria by the ancient Greeks due to its thriving viticulture, today Calabria cultivates an abundance of varieties. The most common black grapes are Gaglioppo, Magliocco, Marsigliana, Nerello Mascalese, Prunesta, Sangiovese and Alicante, and among the whites Greco Bianco, Mantonico, Pecorello and Guardavalle. The local varieties are of course joined by international cultivars, in particular, Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon. Grapes are also grown high on the Sila plateau, allowing Calabria to claim the record for the highest vineyards in Europe.

A promontory under vine at Bagnara Calabra on the “Violet Coast”

B. Ienco/PROLOCO BAGNARA CALABRA

The terroir

Despite a glorious past, the image today of Calabria’s winemaking industry has deteriorated due to the excessive division of the vineyards into small plots and the production of wine in bulk. Happily the situation is changing thanks to a reappraisal of the value of local varieties and the improved quality of the grapes and production methods. New growing and cellar techniques are being introduced to replace obsolete methods.

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Medium 9781574415889

Salads and Salad Dressings

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS

We’ve got savory, wholesome, and delicious salads in all shapes, sizes, flavors, and colors. Some are sides, and some are meals in themselves. Some are exotic, some not. They’re all fresh and unique, and our dressings just make them come alive. Even with familiar favorites, we always add our own touch just to make them interesting. Best of all, you don’t have to skip the dressing. We pay special attention to dressings because, unfortunately, you just don’t know what’s in restaurant dressings and most of the ones from the grocery store contain gluten.

You simply have to try our Warm Brown Sugar and Applewood-Smoked Bacon Dressing; you won’t believe what it does to an everyday salad. You’ll never go back to ranch once you’ve tried our Buttermilk Romano Herb Dressing. And you’ll love the Grilled Peach, Feta, and Spinach Salad with our Sherry Balsamic Vinaigrette, and our Asian Chicken Salad made with Crystallized Ginger. These creative salads add a touch of elegance to your table. Give these salads your own flair, but most of all, enjoy them. Own them.

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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the Blackland Prairies

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the Blackland

Prairies*

This area of about 12 million acres, while called a “prairie,” has much timber along the streams, including a variety of oaks, pecan, elm, bois d’arc, and mesquite. In its native state, it was largely a grassy plain—the first native grassland in the westward extension of the Southern Forest region.

Most of this fertile area has been cultivated, and only small acreages of grassland remain in original vegetation. In heavily grazed pastures, the tall bunchgrass has been replaced by buffalograss,

Texas grama, and other less productive grasses. Mesquite, lotebush, and other woody plants have invaded the grasslands.

The original grass vegetation includes big and little bluestem, indiangrass, switchgrass, sideoats grama, hairy grama, tall dropseed,

Texas wintergrass, and buffalograss. Non-grass vegetation is largely legumes and composites.

*Stephan L. Hatch, Texas Almanac, 2014–2015, Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor (Austin: Texas State Historical Association), 115. Used with permission of Texas State Historical Association.

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Medium 9781574414929

Meats

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Meats

Roast beef is a word thrown about loosely. To me it means Prime Ribs, to others just a piece of meat, but when roasting beef you should insist on a rib, top sirloin or top round. . . . The tenderloin, which is smaller and expensive, may also be used for roasting. The best quality you can find in your local market should be used for roasting. . . . Roasted beef can never be any better than the grade of beef you start out with.

.   .   .

A barbecue originally referred to a whole animal roasted or broiled for a feast. Derived from the French “barbe-a-gueve,” meaning from snout to tail, the popular version of the word barbecue or cook-out was first known in Virginia before 1700.

Don’t forget the secret of barbecuing is a solid bed of glowing coals. Whether charcoal, wood or other fuel is used, light the fire at least 30 minutes ahead of time so that it will burn down to ash-gray coals before cooking starts.

Rub the outsides of pots and pans with soap before using over an open fire. They will be much easier to clean afterward.

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Medium 9781574411362

Amarillo

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

AMARILLO

We have all been brought up on stories from the “Panhandle,” the northern part of Texas that is truly the shape and just as flat as the handle of an old pot iron skillet. Perhaps the most famous tale is the myth that in winter there is nothing between Amarillo and the North Pole but a barbed wire fence—very often the fence gets blown down.

Somehow none of the trips we had made through Texas had ever taken us to the Panhandle; we were always turning up in the middle of the skillet, so to speak. Five hundred miles from Austin to Amarillo is a fer piece, unless, of course, there is some special occasion. Indeed such an opportunity arose when our oldest son, Ken, announced that he and Jane were to be married June 22, at her home in Amarillo! This caused a great flurry of excitement in our household. We held the traditional Sunday morning brunch to make the announcement to all of our family. There were twenty-four of us seated around the long family dining table. We were fortunate to have as guests Jane’s parents, Judge and Mrs. Carl Periman. They had come down primarily to attend Jane’s graduation at Texas University and to hear President Lyndon B. Johnson give the address—but academic “triumph” soon became of secondary interest. At breakfast, we tried to keep the conversation centered around the young prospective bride and groom, drinking toasts intermittently with *Milk Punch, followed by this menu:

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Medium 9781574411935

5. Sauces, Spreads, Dressings, and Pestos

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Sauces

This introduction was in my book The Pepper Trail but it bears repeating.

Sauces are described as every kind of liquid or semi-liquid seasoning for food. They may or may not use spices. The ancient Latin word for broths or soups (sauces) was

“juices” or ius in singular form. The French sauce and the

Spanish and Italian salsa succeeded ius. Sauce is derived from the Latin for salted, saltus. Humans first seasoned their food with salts, then sauces. During the evolution of sauces only the more-or-less liquid consistency has remained relatively constant, with taste being the limitless element. Obviously there are many categories of sauces that have been incorporated into virtually every cuisine.

In medieval European households sauces were mainly served with foods preserved by brining and pickling.These sauces made the foods more palatable, or more tolerable in that period of no refrigeration and slow transportation. In most of the rest of the world they were used as a vehicle for legumes, vegetables, and/or meat that was served with the local starch core—rice, maize, manioc, potatoes, pasta—to make it nutritious and palatable.

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Medium 9781574415889

Vegetables and Savory Accompaniments

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

VEGETABLES AND SAVORY ACCOMPANIMENTS

Welcome to our world of fresh, nutritious vegetables. Fresh vegetables are an important part of the healthy gluten-free lifestyle. We’ve learned that there are so many wonderful ways to prepare vegetable dishes. Our Roasted Potatoes with Caramelized Shallots, Blue Cheese and Asparagus tossed with Lemon Vinaigrette is among our favorites, as is Creamed Sweet Corn with Bacon and Jalapeño. And Kim’s Balsamic Herb-Roasted Vegetables? So good and so easy.

We’ve combined many of our vegetables with fruits, cheese, rice, meat, and spices to add variety and excitement. The Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Risotto Cakes are phenomenal, and we think Hatch (New Mexico) green chiles add a robust Southwestern flavor to dishes like our Hoochy-Coo Hatch Green Chile Polenta. Another favorite is Havarti, Gouda, and Cheddar Cheese Grits, and we just can’t get enough of the Gruyère-Jalapeño Scalloped Potatoes with Caramelized Onions.

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