232 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574414868

TÍtulo de la página

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

mexican light

cocina mexicana ligera

healthy cuisine for today’s cook

para el cocinero actual

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Medium 9781574410761

And Then Potatoes, Grains,and Pasta

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

278

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

Reader’s Request

Hashed browned potatoes have always been a gastronomical delight for the man who eats away from home, because most housewives do not include them in their menu planning. . . . These potatoes were so popular at the Driskill Hotel in Austin, Texas, that I would be introduced as “The Hashed Browned Potatoes with Sour Cream Girl.”

HASHED BROWNED POTATOES

For 6

6 baked potatoes (bake at least the day before and refrigerate)

2 tablespoons soft vegetable shortening

1 teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons melted butter

¼ cup sour cream

Peel and grate the cold baked potatoes on the coarse side of a 4-sided grater. . . . Heat the shortening in a heavy griddle or frying pan.

Sprinkle potatoes lightly over the entire surface. Do not pack down.

Sprinkle with salt and pepper and the melted butter. Cook over low heat until brown underneath and loose from the pan. You can lift up the edge to see if they are ready without stirring them. When browned, turn once and cook until the second side is brown. Stack in layers on a hot serving dish with warmed sour cream spread between them. [“Mr. Stanley” Marcus is a fan of these special spuds.—Editor]

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Medium 9781574411935

7. Relishes, Chutneys, Preserves, and Condiments

Jean Andrews University of North Texas Press PDF

Relishes, Chutneys, Preserves, and Condiments

Introduction to Preserving

We can thank the Arabs for preserves, marmalades, jellies, jams, and those sweet condiments that grace our tables and rot our teeth. The Arabs took over the Greco-Roman practice of conserving fruits in honey, and extended or improved the process when they acquired sugar. Sugar had come to Arabia via Persia. The Persians had obtained it from India where the technology of making “raw” sugar originated around 500 B.C., following the introduction of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), probably from New

Guinea. As early as 325 B.C. the Greek geographer Strabo reported that sugarcane was present in India.The Persians carried sugar westward in the sixth century A.D. The Arabs got it from them and introduced it to Syria, North Africa, and Spain. However, at that time the Far East was the only known area of the Old World where the climatic conditions permitted the cultivation of sugar. Consequently, only a small amount made its way to Europe via the Middle East and Venice before 1500.Throughout that period, honey was the primary sweetener, while the costly imported sugar was reserved for medicinal purposes. The

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 13. THE HAPPIEST MEAL: LITTLE MACS AND (REAL) SWEET POTATO FRIES

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

M

E

N

U

13

F

or

this

menu

I’m

using

actual

sweet

po-

tatoes

for

the

“fries”

(which

are

actually

baked).

Everyone

else

knows

“sweet

po-

tato

fries”

to

be

orange

and

sweet

.

.

.

but

those

aren’t

sweet

potatoes

they’re

yams!

(See

WTF at right.)

So

why

am

I

using

sweet

pota-

toes

instead?

The

same

reason

I

started

wear-

ing

a

bow

tie:

to

be

different

and

to

get

attention.

And

they

taste

pretty

darn

good

too

slightly

sweet

with

smoky

spices

and

a

great

creamy

texture

on

the

in-

side.

They’re

a

hell

of

a

lot

more

interesting

than

the

regular

old

french

fries

that

would

accom-

pany

the,

ahem,

larger

version

of

this

burger.

I

think

after

all

is

said

and

done,

these

“fries”

will

be

“America’s

favorite.”

I

hope

so,

for

America’s

sake.

If

you’re

so

inclined,

give

each

of

your

guests

a

little

crappy

toy

that

they

can

throw

away

as

soon

as

they

get

home.

L

I

B

A

T

I

O

N

R

E

C

O

M

M

E

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

Look

no

further

than

a

classic

Jack

and

Coke

for

this

menu

.

.

.

or

Jack

and

Diet

if

you’re

watching

your

figure.

W

T

F

is

the

difference

be-

tween

sweet

potatoes

and

yams?

There

are

so

many

botanical

dif-

ferences

that

my

head

almost

exploded

when

I

was

reading

and

trying

to

understand

them.

For

me

to

even

attempt

to

regurgitate

what

I

probably

didn’t

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Medium 9781574414868

Working with Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

WORKING WITH CHILES

POBLANOS • ROASTING AND CLEANING:

Roast the poblano chile directly over a gas flame until blackened on all sides (if you do not have a gas stove, lay the chile on a tray under a hot broiler). Transfer to a plastic bag and let sweat for 10–15 minutes. Peel off all the charred skin, dipping your fingers in water if needed. In Mexico, it’s common to see chiles peeled under running water; this does make it easier. However, you will lose some of the flavor. Be careful not to tear the chile when peeling.

FOR CHILES RELLENOS:

Make a long slit down one side of the chile and remove all the seeds and veins with your fingers. (This is where the heat of the chile is concentrated, so be sure to clean it thoroughly.) Leave the stem attached.

*You can always stuff your chiles, or at least roast and clean them, a day in advance.

FOR POBLANO STRIPS (RAJAS):

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Medium 9781574414929

Potatoes, Grains and Pasta

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

And Then Potatoes, Grains, and Pasta

There is nothing that smells better than potatoes baking. Idaho potatoes are the popularized ones, but California and Maine produce a fine type for baking or any other style of cooking. For me, Idaho takes the lead for baking because of its shape—long, flat, quicker cooking than the round kind. Just scrubbed and placed in a 350° oven and baked until done, about 1 hour, but timed to come out when you are ready to sit down; or rubbed in vegetable oil and salt; or wrapped in brown paper or aluminum foil to keep them from cooling off. Just bake them, and the whole family will succumb—even the curvaceous ones. Serve with sweet butter or sour cream, chopped chives, grated cheese, crisped salt pork—or all of them.

POTATOES ON THE HALF SHELL

For 6

6 Idaho potatoes

1/4 cup milk or cream

1 egg

4 tablespoons butter

Salt and pepper

1 tablespoon chopped green onions [optional]

[Preheat oven to 350°.] Bake the potatoes, cut in half lengthwise and scoop out the potato. Mash, while hot, with the milk, beaten egg, and butter and beat until fluffy. Season with salt and pepper, and onion if you wish. Spread the shell with [additional] butter and pile lightly and high into it. Sprinkle with a smidgen of nutmeg or paprika or grated Parmesan cheese.* Bake until brown on top.

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Medium 9781609520809

9. Do Not Feed the Bears

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Nine

Do Not Feed the Bears

Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.

Archy the Cockroach, from Don Marquis, Archy and Mehitabel, 1927

Weeks later, as fall draws near, the morning sun means that John and I will be bushwhacking up the mountain in back of the Big House. The reason is to look for moose and deer sign, because this is what hunters do. Its also just to get to the top of the mountain, because its there, and its a beautiful day. Dressed in hiking gear and ready to go, I start filling water bottles to stuff into our daypacks as John sits at the chair by the door and starts lacing on hiking boots.

Just so you know, Don says laconically to John from his lounger in the living room, the McKennas were back there, setting up bear bait.

(... bear bait?)

They quit hunting bears, Don continues. Now they run a little guide business for tourists who want to see bears. But dont be surprised if you smell something.

(... smell something?)

Err, I say, raising my hand to object.

Not likely youll find yourself in the same spot, Don drawls, pointedly ignoring the surprised look on my face, but no need to worry. Bears get timid as soon as the bait comes out because they know the seasons starting. Theyll just run away from you.

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Medium 9780991309405

Chapter 6: Put Out the Kindling: Address the Chemical Triggers

Ya-Ling J. Liou Return to Health Press™ PDF

CHAPTER 6

Put Out the Kindling:

Address the Chemical Triggers

THESE CHEMICAL TRIGGERS ARE A LITTLE sneakier than the mechanical category of everyday pain triggers—less obvious, just like glowing embers disguised as white coals: They don’t necessarily look all that hot or dangerous, but they will easily ignite any nearby kindling in a heartbeat.

If your pain is not completely new, then it’s very likely that the initial steps of stopping, dropping and rolling (as was laid out at the beginning of this chapter), are not going to have a very dramatic effect on your situation. These are still steps you should take, because they will help to begin recalibrating the body’s sense of where it should physically be occupying space in order to be more comfortable, restoring a sense of “neutral.”

Although the relief from the stop, drop and roll technique is temporary, it’s an important set of actions needed not only to restore mechanical peace, but also to re-educate your neuroendocrine system (part of what controls body chemistry) about how to not be in

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Medium 9781609520809

8. The O in the No

Paula Young Lee Travelers' Tales ePub

Chapter Eight

The O in the No

The cat that cannot reach the meat says it stinks.

Persian proverb.

Seven A.M. Sunday. There is no hunting today, so John is sitting morosely at his breakfast, eating French toast made with warm eggs just laid by the hens. I swear the chickens looked proud of themselves when I went to the henhouse this morning. Some days, they are too busy bickering to notice me hovering by the door in my pajamas and boots. Other times, they press forward, expecting me to give them nice tasty worms. Today, they practically stuck a name tag on each shell so Id know which hen laid which egg. By the time I trundled back to the human house, John was sitting at table, waiting for his breakfast, and reading Uncle Henrys because I hide Guns & Ammo on church day. Uncle Henrys has a Firearms section that he checks religiously. He also looks for snowmobiles, ATVs, and tractors.

His mother wanders in the kitchen, looking for coffee.

Hey Mum, he calls without preamble. You want a peacock?

No, she says flatly.

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Medium 9781608682348

Menu 14. LITTLE TOKYO

Brian L. Patton New World Library ePub

129

LITTLE TOKYO

U-NO-gi Nigiri with Kabayaki Sauce

1 tablespoon low-sodium tamari, plus more for serving

2 teaspoons maple syrup

2 drops liquid smoke (see WTF below)

3 teaspoons canola oil

2 portobello mushrooms, stemmed

1 teaspoon sesame oil

2 cups cooked sushi rice (recipe follows)

1 or 2 sheets nori, cut into sixteen 4-inch-by-½-inch strips

¼ cup store-bought kabayaki sauce or Sexy Kabayaki Sauce (recipe follows,

page 132)

Sesame seeds, for garnish

Wasabi paste, for serving

In

a

large

bowl,

whisk

together

1

tablespoon

tamari,

the

maple

syrup,

liquid

smoke,

and

1

teaspoon

of

the

canola

oil,

then

add

the

mushrooms

and

toss

to

coat.

In

a

medium

skillet,

heat

the

remain-

ing

2

teaspoons

canola

oil

over

medium

heat.

Place

the

mush-

rooms,

gill

side

up,

in

the

pan,

and

sear

for

3

to

4

minutes,

or

until

browned.

Flip

the

mushrooms,

and

drizzle

the

sesame

oil

over

the

tops.

Cook

for

3

to

4

more

minutes,

until

the

mushrooms

are

cooked

all

the

way

through.

Let

cool.

While

the

mushrooms

are

cooling,

take

a

little

bit

of

the

sushi

rice

and

form

it

into

an

oblong

ball

about

the

size

of

a

thumb.

Make

16

of

these.

When

the

mushrooms

are

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Medium 9781574410761

Soups and Stews

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

52

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

CHICKEN BROTH À LA ZODIAC

A demitasse cup of this flavorful steaming broth was served to every diner in the Zodiac Room. It put the customers in the right frame of mind and quickly became our trademark. The broth was prepared when we simmered hens as a first step to other preparations.

[“Another Corbitt item was her absolute insistence that every lunch or dinner begin with a cup of steaming hot chicken broth, and woe to the person who did not relish and consume his chicken soup. Such a person absolutely did not belong in the Zodiac level of society.”

—Evelyn Oppenheimer, an old friend of Corbitt’s and, as a great supporter of letters, one for whom the University of North Texas

Press’ book series is named. She was delighted to learn that Corbitt’s book would be the first book in the Evelyn Oppenheimer Series.]

[For complete directions, see page 128; proceed to the point where you remove the chicken, strain the broth and serve.—Editor]

For a clearer broth, break two eggs into the pot of broth. Bring to a fast boil. Set aside until eggs float to the top. Strain through a fine sieve or through cheese cloth.

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Medium 9782067181977

LAZIO

Michelin Michelin ePub

LAZIO

Lazio is one of Italy’s top wine-producing regions. The zones that are most suited to viticulture are the hills of volcanic origin, whose soil, composed of lava and tufa, provides high-quality nourishment to the vines. Back in the times of the Romans the Castelli Romani hill area was already used to grow grapes, and the wines they produced were sought after in the banquets and festivities of Rome’s leading citizens. White wines are more prevalent but there are also interesting reds, like those made from Cesanese grapes.

The countryside between Rieti and Terni

Claudio Giovanni Colombo/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Historically a white wine producer, most of Lazio’s viticulture is concentrated in the Castelli Romani and the provinces of Viterbo, Frosinone and Latina. The most commonly grown white-skinned grapes are Trebbiano, Malvasia, Bellone, Bombino Bianco, Grechetto and Moscato di Terracina. The most widespread black-skinned grapes, on the other hand, are Cesanese, Ciliegiolo, Sangiovese, Montepulciano, Cabernet and Merlot. Today Lazio can boast 27 DOC zones of which one, Moscato di Terracina, was only recently established.

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Medium 9781574411362

Luling

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

LULING

We were standing on Main Street, Luling, Texas, waving at the young beautiful belles atop the flower-bedecked floats as they cruised by in parade celebrating the Eleventh Annual Watermelon Thump. The spectators stood under the shade of umbrellas or large straw hats, or huddled under the shady fronts of the stores as the gay caravan interspersed with high school and veteran bands moved along in the hundred-degree summer sun. In the background along Main Street, the pumps on the oilwells were busily going about their business.

In 1922, when oil was first discovered in this area, Luling was a sleepy little town with only about fourteen hundred people, who were principally engaged in farming, railroading, or cattle raising. The arrival of Mr. Edgar B. Davis from his home in Massachusetts stirred this town from its drowsy inactivity.

Six attempts to find the elusive oil in Luling brought Mr. Davis down to the last dollar of his shoe and rubber fortune; but he succeeded in striking oil on the seventh try. From the day this oil well, called Rios No. 1., came in as a great gusher, the city of Luling has steadily progressed.

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Medium 9782067181977

AOSTA VALLEY

Michelin Michelin ePub

AOSTA VALLEY

The mighty presence of Monte Bianco looms over this region, where grapes are grown in extreme conditions. The vines tenaciously climb the steep slopes in some of the highest vineyards in Europe, challenging the often adverse conditions. The fact that viticulture in the Aosta Valley has managed to achieve such high levels of quality is greatly due to the regional administration. The decision to focus on excellence resulted in the replanting of vineyards, the protection of native species of vine, investment in wine cooperatives, and use of sustainable, integrated agricultural methods. This commitment has been repaid: though modest in terms of quantity, today the local wine production is of superior quality.

Issogne Castle

Metrò Studio Associato/ UFFICIO REGIONALE INFORMAZIONI TURISTICHE

The terroir

There is a single designation of origin, Valle d’Aosta DOC, which breaks down into further specifications that identify the production zones (Donnas, Enfer d’Arvier, Arnad Montjovet, Nus, Chambave, Torrette, Blanc de Morgex and de La Salle), the types of wine (Rosso, Rosato, Bianco, Passito, Superiore and Spumante) and the varieties of grape used (Chardonnay, Cornalin, Fumin, Gamay, Mayolet, Merlot, Nebbiolo, Premetta, Petite Arvine, Petite Rouge, Pinot Nero, Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio, Syrah, Müller Thurgau). This system of designations covers a wide range of wines, many of which are excellent value for money.

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Medium 9781574411362

Fort Worth

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

FORT WORTH

Fort Worth is considered the most typically Texan of all Texas cities. It is a city blended with cattle, oil, business and industry and the greatest of assets—a progressive and friendly citizenship. To the flutter of a flag and the notes of a bugle, Fort Worth was founded by Major Ripley A. Arnold on June 6, 1849. Before that eventful day, this region had had a history, much of it unrecorded. It was a lush and lovely land, with clear streams and blue skies. Game abounded and this was a favorite hunting ground of the Indians, therefore becoming the site of many bloody wars. General William J. Worth, commander of the United States military forces with headquarters in San Antonio, had instructed Arnold to establish a military post for the protection of settlers against the Indians. So Arnold named the post Camp Worth (later to be called Fort Worth) in honor of this gallant commander. Born in New York State in 1794, Worth entered the Army as a private and rose to the rank of major general. He fought in the War of 1812 and played a leading part in the Florida-Indian War, bringing about peace with the Seminoles. In the War with Mexico, Worth displayed great gallantry in the taking of Monterey and aided in the storming of Chapultepec and the capture of Mexico City. He was buried in New York City, and a monument stands at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. The greatest monument to the brave soldier, however, is the great city which bears his name. Great herds of long-horns were driven from Texas to the railheads in Kansas. Fort Worth was on the main route, sometimes called the Chisholm Trail. The lowing herds camped near the town, and cowboys galloped in firing their pistols into the air and even rode their horses into the saloons—Fort Worth is still referred to as Cowtown. “Wild and woolly” characterized much of Fort Worth’s life in the 1880’s. Most celebrated of six-gun exponents was long-haired James Courtright, who could shoot equally well with either hand and was a master of the “border shift,” wherein a pistol was drawn, fired, tossed in the air, caught in the other hand and fired again.

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