168 Chapters
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Medium 9781574412185

Working with Chiles

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

WORKING

WITH

POBLANOS • ROASTING

CHILES

AND CLEANING:

Roast the poblano chile directly over a gas flame until blackened on all sides (if you do not have a gas stove, lay the chile on a tray under a hot broiler). Transfer to a plastic bag and let sweat for 10–15 minutes. Peel off all the charred skin, dipping your fingers in water if needed. In Mexico, it’s common to see chiles peeled under running water; this does make it easier. However, you will lose some of the flavor. Be careful not to tear the chile when peeling.

FOR

CHILES RELLENOS:

Make a long slit down one side of the chile and remove all the seeds and veins with your fingers. (This is where the heat of the chile is concentrated, so be sure to clean it thoroughly.)

Leave the stem attached.

*You can always stuff your chiles, or at least roast and clean them, a day in advance.

FOR

POBLANO STRIPS (RAJAS):

Remove the core of the chile with a knife and make a slit down one side, opening it flat.

Remove all the remaining seeds and veins. Cut into thin strips.

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Medium 9782067181977

SARDINIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

SARDINIA

Sardinia has always been open to commercial and cultural exchange: in consequence, having also been conquered by the Phoenicians, Romans, Spanish and Piedmontese, the island has been strongly marked by the passage of other peoples of the Mediterranean, even in its viticulture. The range of native varieties is enormous and includes Bovale, Cannonau, Carignano, Monica, Girò, Cagnulari, Pascale, Nuragus, Nasco, Seminano, which, with others like Vermentino, Moscato, Malvasia and Vernaccia, are used to produce the region’s most important wines. However, despite this wide assortment, the cultivars that are most representative of Sardinia are essentially two: Vermentino and Cannonau.

The wild coastline of the island of San Pietro

E. Locci/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Sardinian wines are generally of good quality, well structured, fairly alcoholic, full flavoured and complex in terms of taste and smell. The inherent interest of the production zone is heightened by its varied character. Appreciation of the native varieties has always been broad and the island’s traditional wines have never been forgotten or neglected.

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Medium 9781574410761

Cheese and Eggs

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

236

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

SWISS CHEESE SOUFFLÉ

For 8 to 10

[If you plan to serve this with Oriental Chicken [page 134], use American (Cheddar) cheese rather than Swiss and add ¼ teaspoon of White

Wine Worcestershire sauce.]

½ cup butter

6 tablespoons flour

2 cups milk

2 cups grated Swiss cheese

8 eggs, separated [at room temperature]

1½ teaspoons dry mustard or 1 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard

⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon salt

Parmesan cheese (may be omitted)

[Preheat oven to 350°.] Melt the butter, add the flour and cook slowly until mixture foams. Do not brown. [Gradually] add the milk, [stirring constantly], and bring to a boil; use low heat to ensure the flour and milk being thoroughly cooked. The sauce should be smooth and thick. Remove from heat. Add the [Swiss] cheese and stir until blended. Cool slightly. Beat the egg yolks and add to the mixture.

Add the mustard, cayenne and salt. Let mixture cool until you can place your hand on the bottom of the container without feeling any heat. Beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry. (Tip the bowl and if the whites do not slide out, they are ready.) Stir gently about one third of the egg whites into the mixture, then fold in remaining egg whites until well distributed. Pour into a 2 ½- or 3-quart buttered soufflé dish sprinkled lightly with Parmesan cheese or into two 1½quart ones. Bake for 30 minutes if you are going to eat at once, or place in a pan of hot water and bake 1 hour, and it will hold awhile.

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Medium 9781574412185

Metric Conversion Chart

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9780253357076

2 The Social Dynamics of the Home Meal

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

2    The Social Dynamics of the Home Meal

In this second chapter on the Hoianese home meal, I expand my analysis in two directions: the first deals with the dynamics of the home-eaten meal, stressing its flexibility, variety, and ability to encompass change; the second sets the ground for the discussion of the interrelations between foodways and other social and cultural practices. I first classify the culinary process into stages, examining how each stage reflects, maintains and, at times, defines intra-family roles, statuses, and hierarchies. Specifically, I examine the conventional view of women as having a lower status, which appears to be in keeping with their identification with the low-status kitchen and cooking. An analysis of the changing roles of Hoianese women with regard to the culinary sphere at home reveals a much more nuanced and dynamic picture, however. The chapter concludes with an analysis of the tensions between the individual and the collective, as they materialize around the Hoianese table, emphasizing elements of social competition and conflict, which are essential though implicit aspects of the Hoianese meal.

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Medium 9781574411362

Beaumont

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

BEAUMONT

The Broussards’ house in Beaumont stands empty and silent as the busy traffic of this thriving city in southeast Texas zips by. The blooming magnolia trees appear sad as they stand guard around it. Chessie Taylor lives in a comfortable house surrounded with big fig trees in the side yard. Chessie cooked for the Broussard family for fifty-five years, and of course this is her home.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Broussard built this spacious home in 1909 for their family of eleven. Needless to say, it was brimming over with the activities of nine healthy children and is remembered as one of the happiest houses in this area. Papa Joe would beam broadly when his entire brood was around the big dining table. Even after the children married, this house was still the gathering place for all of them on special occasions such as birthdays, christenings, and Christmas, and the usual lively pace was even more lively with the hustle of twenty-six grandchildren and more than sixty great-grandchildren.

Joe Broussard was not only the patriarch of this fine family but a very strong force in the development and progress of the Beaumont area. When Joe was a young man, he tended cattle on his mother’s homeplace. He was also the home gardener, for he loved the soil and trusted it. He decided there were big things to be done in farming in that part of Texas. Lumber had been the mainstay in Beaumont in those days, but the pine and cypress trees had pretty well been cut out, and this land, bereft of its timber, was almost abandoned.

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Medium 9781574412185

Secretos para una alimentación saludable

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

SECRETOS

PARA UNA

ALIMENTACIÓN SANA

La alimentación sana fue la que nos enseñaron en casa cuando éramos niños. Nos dijeron que debíamos seguir una dieta balanceada, comer verduras y que el postre se reservaba únicamente para ocasiones especiales. Desafortunadamente, en el mundo moderno el concepto de la buena alimentación ha cambiado. Hemos reemplazado las comidas nutritivas hechas en casa con comida rápida y nuestras alacenas están llenas de productos procesados y llenos de químicos. Todo es abundante, fácil de preparar (o por lo menos es lo que prometen las instrucciones de los paquetes) y alguien más realiza la mayor parte del trabajo. Esto hace que cocinar todo desde un principio, utilizando frutas y verduras e ingredientes de buena calidad parezca demasiado difícil y que no vale la pena perder el tiempo en ello. Este libro le demostrará que preparar comida nutritiva en casa es fácil, rápido y que vale la pena hacer el esfuerzo.

Más que 50 por ciento de la población de los Estados Unidos está excedida de peso. La nueva epidemia nacional es la obesidad, la cual es la causa directa de muchas enfermedades: cardiopatías, derrames cerebrales (embolias), diabetes, alta presión arterial, depresión y osteoartritis (400,000 muertes al año se relacionan con la obesidad). Las personas consumen más calorías de las que queman, por lo general en alimentos procesados, azúcares y carbohidratos. Nuestro estilo de vida sedentario es parte del problema, junto con las porciones cada vez más grandes que sirven en los restaurantes (Aumentar el precio y el tamaño de la porción finalmente resulta en mayores ganancias para los restaurantes). Si para redondear su “dieta moderna” toma algunos refrescos embotellados, o alguna otra bebida dulce es muy probable que tenga un problema de exceso de peso. México sigue los pasos de su vecino del norte y las enfermedades relacionadas con el sobrepeso, especialmente la diabetes, van en aumento.

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Medium 9781574411362

Amarillo

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

AMARILLO

We have all been brought up on stories from the “Panhandle,” the northern part of Texas that is truly the shape and just as flat as the handle of an old pot iron skillet. Perhaps the most famous tale is the myth that in winter there is nothing between Amarillo and the North Pole but a barbed wire fence—very often the fence gets blown down.

Somehow none of the trips we had made through Texas had ever taken us to the Panhandle; we were always turning up in the middle of the skillet, so to speak. Five hundred miles from Austin to Amarillo is a fer piece, unless, of course, there is some special occasion. Indeed such an opportunity arose when our oldest son, Ken, announced that he and Jane were to be married June 22, at her home in Amarillo! This caused a great flurry of excitement in our household. We held the traditional Sunday morning brunch to make the announcement to all of our family. There were twenty-four of us seated around the long family dining table. We were fortunate to have as guests Jane’s parents, Judge and Mrs. Carl Periman. They had come down primarily to attend Jane’s graduation at Texas University and to hear President Lyndon B. Johnson give the address—but academic “triumph” soon became of secondary interest. At breakfast, we tried to keep the conversation centered around the young prospective bride and groom, drinking toasts intermittently with *Milk Punch, followed by this menu:

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Medium 9781574415889

Salads and Salad Dressings

Kim Stanford and Bill Backhaus University of North Texas Press ePub

SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS

We’ve got savory, wholesome, and delicious salads in all shapes, sizes, flavors, and colors. Some are sides, and some are meals in themselves. Some are exotic, some not. They’re all fresh and unique, and our dressings just make them come alive. Even with familiar favorites, we always add our own touch just to make them interesting. Best of all, you don’t have to skip the dressing. We pay special attention to dressings because, unfortunately, you just don’t know what’s in restaurant dressings and most of the ones from the grocery store contain gluten.

You simply have to try our Warm Brown Sugar and Applewood-Smoked Bacon Dressing; you won’t believe what it does to an everyday salad. You’ll never go back to ranch once you’ve tried our Buttermilk Romano Herb Dressing. And you’ll love the Grilled Peach, Feta, and Spinach Salad with our Sherry Balsamic Vinaigrette, and our Asian Chicken Salad made with Crystallized Ginger. These creative salads add a touch of elegance to your table. Give these salads your own flair, but most of all, enjoy them. Own them.

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Medium 9782067181977

ISTRIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

CANTON TICINO

Canton Ticino in Switzerland has strong links with Italy, starting with their common language and a passion for wine. The canton lies in a critical location touched upon by a variety of physical landscapes: those of the Alps, Lakes Maggiore and Lugano, woodlands and the plain. The canton enjoys a continental climate but is also affected by the proximity of the Mediterranean. The human presence has created everything from villages founded in ancient times to large modern cities. The winemaking districts are divided between Sopraceneri (Bellinzona, Blenio, Riviera, Leventina, Locarno, Vallemaggia) and Sottoceneri (Lugano and Mendrisio). The most common variety of grape is Merlot, which alone covers more than 80% of the land planted to vine and is vinified almost exclusively pure.

Vineyards in the Swiss sunshine

Avner Richard/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

The vineyards for the most part occupy hillside terraces. Today there are more than 200 wineries in operation in Canton Ticino, almost all of which are small to medium-sized. For many producers winemaking is more of a hobby than a business.

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Medium 9780253357076

5 Wedding Feasts: From Culinary Scenarios to Gastro-anomie

Nir Avieli Indiana University Press ePub

5    Wedding Feasts

FROM CULINARY SCENARIOS TO GASTRO-ANOMIE

Weddings are the single most important event in Hoianese lives. Complex affairs lasting several days, they involve a huge expenditure of time, effort, and money, in a series of ceremonies that fundamentally alter the social positions of the bride and groom as well as their extended families. Food has an extremely important role and each and every ceremonial stage of a Hoianese marriage is marked by some kind of feast—indeed, guests are literally invited to “eat the wedding” (an cuoi).

Following a brief discussion of “traditional” Vietnamese weddings, this chapter is organized according to the chronological stages of a contemporary Hoianese wedding, but the ceremonies and feasts described belong to separate weddings in different social contexts. Thus, while the sequence in which wedding ceremonies develop from one stage to the next is maintained, there are intra-stage comparisons that stress the prominence of the Hoianese culinary scenario, while modifications that were made to this culinary script under particular social circumstances are singled out for discussion.

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Medium 9781574414868

Basic Ingredients

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

BASIC INGREDIENTS

CHEESES

MANCHEGO

Use only Mexican Manchego cheese, not Spanish, since the texture is quite different. It can be found in most large supermarkets. If you cannot find Manchego, substitute Monterey Jack.

R ANCHERO

Ranchero cheese or Mexican fresh cheese is dry and crumbly. If you cannot find it in a Latin supermarket, substitute dry feta or Parmesan.

CREAM

The recipes in this cookbook use Mexican crema, which can be found in Latin supermarkets. A close substitute would be crème fraîche, diluted with a little milk, or sour cream.

MEXICAN LIMES

Mexican limes are Key limes and can be found in most supermarkets throughout the southern United States. If you cannot find them, you’re better off using green limes than lemons.

CHICKEN STOCK

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Medium 9781574410761

Soups and Stews

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

52

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

CHICKEN BROTH À LA ZODIAC

A demitasse cup of this flavorful steaming broth was served to every diner in the Zodiac Room. It put the customers in the right frame of mind and quickly became our trademark. The broth was prepared when we simmered hens as a first step to other preparations.

[“Another Corbitt item was her absolute insistence that every lunch or dinner begin with a cup of steaming hot chicken broth, and woe to the person who did not relish and consume his chicken soup. Such a person absolutely did not belong in the Zodiac level of society.”

—Evelyn Oppenheimer, an old friend of Corbitt’s and, as a great supporter of letters, one for whom the University of North Texas

Press’ book series is named. She was delighted to learn that Corbitt’s book would be the first book in the Evelyn Oppenheimer Series.]

[For complete directions, see page 128; proceed to the point where you remove the chicken, strain the broth and serve.—Editor]

For a clearer broth, break two eggs into the pot of broth. Bring to a fast boil. Set aside until eggs float to the top. Strain through a fine sieve or through cheese cloth.

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Medium 9782067181977

SICILY

Michelin Michelin ePub

SICILY

Trinacria – the queen of the Mediterranean – was invaded time and again over the centuries by various peoples: the Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Romans, the Byzantines, the Normans and the Arabs. Consequently, the island has a particularly varied cultural heritage. In recent years, the region’s wine production has attracted enormous attention, thanks to the prudent redevelopment of viticulture and the excellent results achieved with the cultivation of international varieties.

A winemaking estate in Sicily

Mirabile/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

Sicily boasts an extraordinary heritage of grape varieties: among the whites Catarrato, Carricante, Inzolia, Grillo, Grecanico, Minnella Bianca, Malvasia delle Lipari, Zibibbo (or Moscato d’Alessandria) are native to the island, as are Frappato, Nero d’Avola, Perticone, Calabrese, Nerello Mascalese, Pignatello, Gaglioppo and Nocera among the reds. Nevertheless, international varieties – Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon – are also grown here successfully, yielding exceptional wines. For centuries, Sicily has been associated with sweet wines. Moscato di Noto, Moscato di Siracusa, Passito di Pantelleria and Malvasia delle Lipari are distinguished by their seductive and fruity bouquets, whereas Marsala, the Italian fortified wine that has made history, deserves special mention.

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Medium 9782067181977

FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA

Michelin Michelin ePub

FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA

Situated in the extreme north-east of Italy, Friuli has a wide range of geographical attractions, including mountains, glaciers, beaches, hills, plains and the sea. Its grapes are mainly grown in the central-southern section of the region, where the clayey soil with excellent drainage is particularly suited to winegrowing. Friuli is especially known for white and sweet wines, but its reds are equally enjoyable. The DOCG appellations have been given to Ramandolo and Picolit, voluptuous and velvety dessert wines produced in modest quantities from local grapes. The region’s most representative varieties – ten in all – are Tocai Friulano, Ribolla Gialla, Verduzzo Friulano, Picolit, Vitovska and Malvasia Istriana among the whites; Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso, Schioppettino, Pignolo, Tazzelenghe and Terrano for the reds.

Vineyards in the countryside of Friuli

Ente del Turismo Friuli Venezia Giulia

The terroir

The three DOCGs Picolit, Rosazzo and Ramandolo are in the province of Udine. This same province is also home to Friuli Colli Orientali (with the renowned subzones Cialla, Pignolo di Rosazzo, Ribolla Gialla di Rosazzo, Refosco di Faedis and Schioppettino di Prepotto), Annia, Aquileia, and Latisana, while it shares the appellation Grave with the province of Pordenone. Collio, Isonzo and part of Carso lie in the province of Gorizia, whereas the rest of Carso is in Trieste. Lison is an interregional DOCG that straddles the border between Friuli and the Veneto. What makes Friuli’s wines unique is the composition of the soil. Once the flattish area of the region was covered entirely by water. Over the centuries the detritus, sand and clay settled and telluric movements raised the land to create hills of marl, clay and sand. Today these are the zones of the Ramandolo, Colli Orientali and Collio Goriziano appellations. At the same time the alpine glaciers generated gravel, sand, pebbles and detritus that make the soil composition of the Grave and Isonzo zones so unique. Elsewhere, in the Aquileia, Latisana and Annia designated areas, water was pushed up to the surface. A unique soil composition is also found in Carso Triestino, where the land is described as being “red” owing to the extensive presence of iron-rich clayey rocks.

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