11653 Chapters
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18 Tablighi Jamaat: A Multidimensional Movement of Religious Travellers

Jamal, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

18

Tablighi Jamaat: A

Multidimensional Movement of Religious Travellers

Abdus Sattar Abbasi*

Introduction

A group of around a dozen Muslims with backpack beds, medium-length beards, trousers (shalwar) ending above their ankles, walking with their eyes downcast through the streets and city centres is not an uncommon sight in

South Asia, the Far East, Middle East and Central Asia. These dedicated religious travellers are part of a successful religious movement called Tablighi Jamaat, which has experienced consistent growth over decades. Devotees of Tablighi

Jamaat form a unique organization of religious preachers who spend a significant part of their lifetime travelling with holdalls, spreading the message of prescribed Islamic persona among their fellow Muslims. Their extensive outreach in Muslim communities attracts the interest of many segments of society.

In most parts of the world people respect them, greet them and extend support for their voluntary quest to reform lives of others by knocking on their doors and inviting them to join the movement and join travelling regimens for the development of self and the development of society according to principles set by the founder of the movement.

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14 Holy Foods and Religious Tourism: Konya and Mevlevi Cuisine

Jamal, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

14

Holy Foods and Religious

Tourism: Konya and Mevlevi

Cuisine

Mustafa Yilmaz*, Eda Güneş and Ümit Sormaz

Introduction

Tourism is perceived largely to be based on the trio of sea, sand and sun – that is, traditional mass tourism. However, based on economic and sociocultural factors this perception has changed, which has led to the development of alternative types of tourism (Reisigner, 2009). Many factors affect the development of tourism, and religion is said to be one of the most important of these motivations

(Vukonic, 1996). Visits to holy places and an increased interest in culture and faith has led to a growth in visits to the holy places, which has formed a new sector.

Religion is a integral part of followers’ daily lives, providing social tranquilty and peacefulness, as well as strengthening relationships with others. The concept of religious diversity in society has been known throughout history and will continue into the future. Faith tourism is generally defined as travelling to a holy place for religious reasons in order meet the spiritual needs of individuals (Yılmaz, 2000; Sargın, 2006). People may also travel to worship at certain sites, particularly those sites that are important for religious reasons. This has emerged as the biggest factor in the development of faith tourism.

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16 Religious Practices and Performance in Syrian Shi’ite Religious Tourism

Jamal, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

16

Religious Practices and

Performance in Syrian

Shi’ite Religious Tourism

Shin Yasuda*

Introduction

Religious practices and rituals are considered to be the embodiment of i­ ndividual and collective religious beliefs and solidarity among the followers. It is also recognized as a framework for people’s religious experiences. Because pilgrimages to religious places are often accompanied by numerous religious practices, researchers have analysed the meaning and function of visitors’ religious practices during pilgrimages in order to clarify their beliefs and religious dispositions.

The spread of mass tourism and the formation of the international tourism market have strongly influenced and transformed the activities at religious sites. The literature on tourism studies shows the influence of commercialization in religious activities by focusing on the change of religious practices from religious and traditional ‘rituals’ to touristic and contemporary ‘performances’. People have started to consume these practices as ‘fun’ activities, which is frequently conceptualized as ‘commodification of religion (or culture)’

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9 Sufi Tourism: The Impact of Sufi Heritage on Islamic Religious Tourism

Jamal, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

9

Sufi Tourism: The Impact of Sufi Heritage on Islamic

Religious Tourism

Tariq Elhadary*

Introduction

This chapter attempts to explore the Sufi heritage and its effect on promoting

Islamic religious tourism. It presents the similarities between religious and Sufi tourism. Moreover, the chapter discusses how religious tourism embodies the essence of Sufism in its search for love, peace and knowledge. Sufism embraces love as a means of transformation to be better human beings and how to be close to others as illustrated in Sufi heritage. How can Sufi poetry be utilized to promote religious tourism? Religious-specific needs might encourage Muslims and non-Muslims to travel to a particular destination. Sufism entails its religious values and beliefs that can drive people to travel and follow certain religious routes. Can the experience of exploring the place and interacting with the people render any new meanings of love for both the Sufi as a religious tourist and the religious tourist as a Sufi mystic? Pilgrims often regard the journey they take as a physical manifestation of an inner spiritual journey, with the path travelled being a framework for the travel within (Hall, 2006).

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13 Battlefield Tourism: The Potential of Badr, Uhud and the Trench (Khandaq) Battles for Islamic Tourism

Jamal, A.; Raj, R.; Griffin, K. CABI PDF

13

Battlefield Tourism: The

Potential of Badr, Uhud and the Trench (Khandaq)

Battles for Islamic Tourism

Onur Akbulut* and Yakin Ekin

Introduction

The aim of this chapter is to discuss the role of battlefield tourism within the context of Islamic tourism. Drawing insights from dark and heritage tourism literature, the chapter discusses why people are interested in visiting historical sites associated with famous battles. It then introduces three key battles that have very high significance within the religion of Islam. The chapter finally discusses implications for Islamic tourism.

To set the scene, we would like to present a famous quote:

For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all; since armed injustice is the more dangerous, and he is equipped at birth with the arms of intelligence and with moral qualities which he may use for the worst ends. (Aristotle, translated by Jowett, 1999)

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