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Medium 9781770904958

Mystique

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

Mystique

“You want to get hold of your Canadian people now? … About this oil? You got somebody you can call now about this oil?”

— James Kiernan

Summer 1997. Miami.

Glenn Day was a single, 35-year-old Native Canadian construction worker known to some of his associates as “the Indian.” He was of average height, with a fat belly, and he smoked tobacco cigarettes. Clean-shaven, he kept his hair short and parted to one side. Other than hypothyroidism, he was in good health. Day was originally from a poor family on a reserve near Toronto. He did not pay child support for his two teenage kids, and he had a record for assaulting a police officer in 1980, theft in 1981 and mischief in 1982.

A defense lawyer would later describe Day as “intimidating” and “dangerous.” Two of his friends would describe him as being funny to talk with, a fun guy, a “good bullshitter,” a guy who liked to drink heavily at parties and get “plastered,” who gave up alcohol completely for a while and then went back, who never used illegal drugs, a guy who smiled a lot — and who was selfish and untrustworthy, in their later opinion.

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Medium 9781574412246

12. Shootout at Wildy Well

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

twelve

Shootout at Wildy Well

Shortly after the hearing, Fall temporarily left New Mexico. As a captain in Company D, New Mexico Volunteers, Fall joined the SpanishAmerican War. Although he did not go to Cuba and fight in the war, he stayed out of New Mexico for the time being.1 An interesting side note was the endorsements Fall received in his quest to be a captain in the war. One letter of endorsement that came to Governor

Otero was signed by Numa Reymond, Fred Bascom, John McFie,

John Riley, and Pat Garrett.2 Judging from all surviving documents, no one else received the number of endorsements that Fall did, and none of his were from expected Fall supporters. It was obvious that what they really wanted was to get Fall out of New Mexico.

Also leaving for the war was William Llewellyn, who was captain of Troop G in the regiment that would become known as

Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Llewellyn became a lifelong friend of

Theodore Roosevelt. During the Rough Riders’ charge up San Juan

Hill, Llewellyn contracted yellow fever and was sent to a hospital in

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Medium 9781574410297

12: THE GENERAL

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

12
The General

I

The heat—they remembered the heat. Virtually all of the wounded knew that the best way to avoid another shot from Charles Whitman was to lie still and play dead, but for many the heat became unbearable. Onlookers pitied the wounded as much for the pain caused by hot pavement as for the wounds. Claire Wilson had no choice but to lie still for more than an hour as the sun beat down on her until she could be rescued. Instinctively she picked up one leg and moved it from side to side. Witnesses mentally pleaded for her to put that leg down and keep still. “We could see people moving a bit, but they never could get up and walk away.” It would have been easier if they had known that Whitman never shot anyone twice.1

From the top of the Tower, Charles Whitman not only held off an army but he also pinned it down and stayed on the attack. After the tragedy many police officers' written reports stated that they were unable to move from their positions. Whitman's rapid fire suggested a shift to a greater use of the 30-caliber carbine, an automatic rifle. Earlier he tended to use the scoped 6mm Remington, a far more accurate weapon over long distances, but one that required the manual use of a bolt action. Whitman pinned down Patrolman Jim Cooney as the officer made attempts to assist Roy Dell Schmidt, the electrician Whitman killed near University and 21st Streets. “I couldn't get to the man,” said Cooney.2

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Medium 9781574410297

6: AFTER MUCH THOUGHT

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

6
After Much Thought

I

During the summer of 1966 mass murder frequented the news. Truman Capote's In Cold Blood ushered in a “new journalism,” where real events were reported with fictional techniques. Capote engaged in a prolonged investigation to detail the mass murder of the Clutter family of Holcomb, Kansas, by two wanderers on 15 November 1959. Although first serialized in The New Yorker magazine in 1965, In Cold Blood was still the year's most talked about bestseller in 1966.

Mr. Herbert Clutter, an affluent wheat farmer, employed several farm hands. Floyd Wells, a former employee, later served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary where he became friends with a fellow prisoner named Richard E. Hickock, who made repeated efforts to learn as much about the Clutter family as possible. Specifically, Hickock was interested in finding out if the Clutters had a safe in their home. Wells either suggested or Hickock conjured up a nonexistent safe located in a wall behind Herb Clutter's office desk. Eventually, Hickock was paroled. Shortly afterwards he and a friend named Perry E. Smith headed for the Clutter home, where they expected to steal at least ten thousand dollars. They did not know that Herbert Clutter had a well-known reputation for not carrying cash; anyone in Holcomb could have told the pitiful fools that Herb Clutter paid for everything by check.

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Medium 9781574413052

Chapter 8 Who in the Hell Are You?

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter

8

Who in the Hell

Are You?

A

fter his 1877 arrest, Long­ley claimed that “after leaving the

Indians, he went to Iowa and ‘knocked around’ for a month or two, and then revisited the state of Kansas.”1 There was no mention by Long­ley of the beautiful Dolores Gomez or any injuries received while trying to outdistance pursuing Mexican bandits, as Fuller later wrote. Very likely, Long­ley leisurely began his way back to Texas without intending much in the way of adventure.

Long­ley said that he ultimately arrived in Morris County in the east central part of Kansas, stopping at the village of Parkersville (now

Parkerville) “to take stock and form his plans for the future.”2 Parkersville, some ten miles northwest of the county seat, Council Grove, was on a branch line of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway that ran from Junction City, north of there, to Parsons in the far southeastern part of the state.3 The main street of the town paralleled the railroad line, and it was likely that Long­ley arrived there by train.

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Medium 9781574410723

5 Parole

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

5

Parole

“I don’t know why people got so excited;

I was just standing there with my knife.”

—Kenneth McDuff

I

At the time of the Broomstick Murders, Bill Miller was a law enforcement officer in the Fort Worth area. He remembers vividly the horrible deaths of Robert, Marcus, and Louise at the hands of Kenneth McDuff.

Later, he had firsthand experience with the McDuffs when he assisted in the investigation of Lonnie’s murder. One day in October 1989, while at his office at the Bell County Sheriff ’s Department, he took a call from a friend who owned a convenience store:

“Guess who just came in my store? Kenneth McDuff,” said the caller.

“Well, there’s going to be problems,” Bill said.1

On October 14, 1989, only three days after Kenneth McDuff walked out of prison, a pedestrian strolling the 1500 block of East Avenue N in

Temple came upon the body of a black female lying in a field of tall grass.

She was in her twenties, about 5’6” and weighed about 115–120 pounds.

She had been beaten and strangled, no more than twenty-four hours before her body was found. Within days, she was identified as a suspected prostitute named Sarafia Parker. Texas Ranger John Aycock later located and interviewed a witness who could allegedly place Parker in a pickup truck driven by McDuff on or about October 12, 1989. On that day, Kenneth McDuff had reported to his parole officer—in Temple. No other connection between the murder of Sarafia Parker and McDuff has ever been established or made public. Although the case is still open, at least officially, and McDuff was never accused of any crime involving

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Medium 9781574413533

Chapter 8. Who in the Hell Are You?

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 8

Who in the Hell Are You?

After his 1877 arrest, Longley claimed that “after leaving the Indians, he went to Iowa and ‘knocked around’ for a month or two, and then revisited the state of Kansas.”1 There was no mention by Longley of the beautiful Dolores Gomez or any injuries received while trying to outdistance pursuing Mexican bandits, as Fuller later wrote. Very likely, Longley leisurely began his way back to Texas without intending much in the way of adventure.

Longley said that he ultimately arrived in Morris County in the east central part of Kansas, stopping at the village of Parkersville (now Parkerville) “to take stock and form his plans for the future.”2 Parkersville, some ten miles northwest of the county seat, Council Grove, was on a branch line of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway that ran from Junction City, north of there, to Parsons in the far southeastern part of the state.3 The main street of the town paralleled the railroad line, and it was likely that Longley arrived there by train.

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Medium 9781574412246

14. Jack Maxwell Testifies

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

fourteen

Jack Maxwell Testifies

The next day led off with the witness whom the prosecution had been waiting for. Jack Maxwell, who claimed he had been absent due to illness, was brought into town by Ben Williams. Maxwell was finally sworn in and took the stand.

Maxwell stated that he had known Lee and Gililland for five or six years and that his ranch was not very far from Lee’s. “On

February 1, 1896, I was at Dog Canyon ranch and spent the night there. I got there just before sundown. When I got there I found

Mrs. Lee [Oilver’s mother], Mr. Blevins, Mr. Bailey, and Ed, the colored man. I ate supper there that night and slept in the house with Mr. Blevins.”

“What time did you get up Sunday morning?” Childers asked.

“At sunup and I ate breakfast with Mr. Blevins and others.”

“Did you see either of these defendants there for breakfast?”

“No sir.”

“What did you do that day?”

“I stayed down at the corral.”

To an unknown question, Maxwell answered, “Saw four persons mounted on two horses coming from the northeast toward the house. They came within 200 yards from me and dismounted.”

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Medium 9781770904958

The Leopard

Mark Coakley ECW Press ePub

The Leopard

“This is the first time the [Ontario Provincial Police] has ever gone to Cuba.”

— OPP Detective Inspector Andy Karski

The RCMP’s liaison officer in Cuba let local police know that Bob DeRosa was wanted for drug and weapons offences in Canada and was now probably in Cuba. In November, the liaison officer contacted the officers running Project Birmingham, telling them that DeRosa had been found in Cuba and was now under surveillance.

Bob DeRosa talked to his mother on the phone about once a week. He told her he was in Cuba to get medical treatments for his back and that the warm weather was doing him good. He’d be returning to Canada for further medical treatments, he said. During one such phone call, DeRosa mentioned the Project Birmingham arrests, saying, “Ma, don’t worry about what you hear, because what they have put in the papers, I never did all of those things — that’s it.”

He often told her affectionately, “Mother, I’ll see you soon.”

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Medium 9781574411676

2 Morocco

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

chapter two

Morocco

“He simply responds to women according to the script, the code, the prescription, the values that his culture has given him regarding women.”

—Dr. Harrell Gill-King

Anthropologist and Defense Expert Witness

I

T

here is an area of northwest Africa, between the Atlas and the

Rif Ranges called the Maghreb, where at the height of its power and prestige, the mighty Roman Empire discovered it could go no farther. The Atlas Mountains form a diagonal range traversing

Morocco from the southwest to the northeast, separating Morocco’s

Atlantic coastal plains to the north and west from the expansive

Sahara Desert to the south. A smaller range, the Rif, runs parallel to the Mediterranean coast. Between the two ranges, which almost merge near the eastern urban center of Taza, a passage connects

Algeria and the rest of North Africa to the Moroccan interior and the Atlantic Ocean.

From Taza, the fan-shaped plain of the Maghreb opens westward toward the Moroccan political capital of Rabat and the business capital of Casablanca. Though geographically close to the Strait of Gibraltar, this area is surprisingly isolated. On a political map, it appears ideally situated to be a portal from the Middle East, through

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Medium 9781574414974

14. “Don’t Hurt Junior”

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

14

“Don’t Hurt Junior”

“Junior ain’t never done anything wrong in all his life.”

Addie McDuff

I

Two years after Sonya Urubek became part of the Reed Case, she testified about the different methods used by investigators in approaching the abduction. Specifically, Don Martin methodically checked out the many leads received, placing no particular emphasis on any one. Sonya was so convinced that the McDuff lead was a good one that she thought it was important to begin gathering evidence from Colleen’s possessions. Those possessions were in large plastic bags in Lori’s attic. Lori took great care of Colleen’s things, still hoping to one day return them to her younger sister. The plastic garbage bags had the effect of sealing and preserving the evidence, making it much easier to collect things like hair samples, and greatly reducing the chance of contamination. Sonya also asked Oliver (Colleen’s boyfriend) to visit APD headquarters, where he volunteered personal evidence for comparison for what would be found on Colleen’s clothes—and possibly her remains, if they should ever be found. Shortly after the abduction, Oliver went to the store where he bought the windbreaker he had given to Colleen—the one she was pictured wearing at the ATM. He tried to buy an identical suit, but could only find one that was nearly identical. The store insisted on giving it to him.1

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Medium 9781574412246

5. Bring in the Pinkertons

Corey Recko University of North Texas Press PDF

five

Bring in the Pinkertons

Shortly after Pat Garrett began his work on the case, Governor

Thornton brought in additional help. Garrett was a man of action, a man who could round up the suspected parties. What Thornton sought next was a professional investigator. He called in the

Pinkertons.

The Pinkerton National Detective Agency had been founded in

1850 by Scottish immigrant Allan Pinkerton. For years, Pinkerton men served as ruthless strikebreakers and bodyguards, most notably for President Lincoln. Pinkerton private detectives also pursued some of the most wanted men in the West, among them the James and Younger gangs, the Hole-in-the-Wall gang, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and the Wild Bunch.1

Thornton contacted the Pinkertons towards the end of February.

It had been worked out ahead of time with James Cree that their investigation would be paid for by the Southeastern New Mexico

Stock Growers’ Association. Cree also sent Thornton the letter he received from Colonel Fountain, dated October 3, 1895, showing

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Medium 9781574414974

16. Heartbreaking Stupidity

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press ePub

16

Heartbreaking Stupidity

“The truth was pushing him around the parking lot.”

Tim Steglich

I

The Bell County Sheriff’s Department could hardly have been more generous with Tim Steglich’s time. For months he did little more than assist the many other law enforcement agencies engaged in the pursuit of Kenneth Allen McDuff. Many leads eventually led to Belton and Temple, and policemen like Tim and Mad Dog Owens provided valuable help. Officially, for Tim, it was a missing person’s case filed by Addie McDuff, and as long as Kenneth was missing he had a duty to look for him. Other agencies were looking for McDuff, but for very different reasons.

On March 24, 1992, the jurisdictions with an interest in Kenneth McDuff met at Bill Johnston’s office in Waco to share information. Don Martin and J. W. Thompson represented the Austin Police Department. Don briefed Tim on his interview of Beverly and mentioned that someone named Morris had directed McDuff to Beverly’s house in Del Valle. Tim readily agreed to look for Morris. He found him the next day, but it was not an easy search. Although Morris was deathly afraid of McDuff, Tim successfully convinced him to give a statement, which was forwarded to the Austin Police Department. After reading the statement, Don and J. W. wanted to talk to Morris. When Tim contacted him again several days later, Morris became abusive. He said he did not want to be harassed. Very patiently, Tim worked with Morris and eventually Morris had a “change of heart.” On April 7, Morris met with Don and J. W. and repeated his statement detailing his trip to Del Valle with Billy and McDuff. He was also willing to take a polygraph to prove he had nothing to do with the abduction of Colleen Reed.1

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Medium 9781574410297

2: The Soldier and the Teacher

Gary M. Lavergne University of North Texas Press PDF

TheSoldierandthe~acher~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

would still have to take orders. He may have been drawn to another form of strict authority after becoming conditioned to taking orders. More likely, a hitch in the marines resulted from an attempt at a dramatic, irrefutable rite of passage into adulthood. No one, not even C. A. Whitman, could seriously argue that a United States

Marine was anything less than a man. For Charlie Whitman, taking orders probably seemed like a small price to pay.

At eighteen, he looked more like a toy soldier than a real one. He stood nearly six feet tall and was not overly muscular, but rather thin and boyish. His long, narrow face and his large smile caused his eyes to squint, and his blond crew-cut accentuated his youthful features. At first, his uniform and his gear looked oversized, but marine life would fill him out considerably. Charlie shortly reached his adult height of six feet, and his weight hovered around 198 pounds. He had been branded with an unsolicited niclmame-"Whit." As a young marine he was easy-going and prone to horseplay. During this first twenty-six-month period of active duty, Charlie underwent numerous routine physical examinations and each found him to be fit."

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Medium 9781574413533

Chapter 20. Not Upon His Doomed Neck

Rick Miller University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 20

Not Upon His Doomed Neck

Bill Longley quickly passed from the pages of Texas newspapers, and his notoriety with him. Other gunmen, such as Hardin and Ben Thompson, stepped to the forefront of the public spotlight, their sort continuing to fascinate those who found glamour and excitement in the larger-than-life exploits of an outlaw, as opposed to the humdrum routine of school, farming, or other similar everyday callings. As with Longley, the notorious Jesse James also capitalized on the press to insure a place in history, although James took great pains to deny his nefarious deeds.

Only eight months after the hanging, however, stories were already being passed around in Dallas that the execution had been a hoax, thus commencing decades of confusion and speculation about the ultimate fate of Bill Longley. “Rich relatives supplied him with a steel corset and neck piece, which prevented the rope from choking him or pulling on his neck at all when the drop fell.” Friends were supposed to have pretended to bury the body, smuggling Longley away and “setting him up in business in California, where he now lives a pious and model young man.”1 Although the story was briefly published in 1879, it did not garner a public response from those who knew better, apparently because it seemed so absurd on its face.

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