219 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9780253002952

10 Decolonial Border Queers: Case Studies of Chicana/o Lesbians, Gay Men, and Transgender Folks in El Paso / Juárez

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

EMMA PÉREZ

. . . but I don’t consider myself gay, not because I think, that “ugh!” you know, it’s because I see me and I see a gay male right here, and then I see [a] heterosexual male on the other side, you know what I mean, and I’m like, in the middle . . .

ORAL INTERVIEW WITH TRANSGENDER COCA SAPIEN (2001)

How do queers in the US-México cities of El Paso and Juárez “recognize themselves as subjects of a sexuality,” and what “fields of knowledge” and types of normativity have led Chicana/o lesbians, gay men, and transgender folks to experience a particular subjectivity?1 I want to consider this specific, historical, political border to argue that for these border queers of color, the particular fields of knowledge that make up their sexuality constitute an epistemology of coloniality. More importantly, queers in El Paso and Juárez must engage and perform decolonial practices to survive the colonial landscape.

When I began my study of queer Chicanas/os and Mexicanas/os in a region that was my home for fourteen years, I realized that questions outnumbered answers and that the twenty-four transcripts of oral interviews in my possession would only provide cursory insights into the lives of a few lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender folks in these geographic borderlands.2 My friend and former colleague at the University of Texas in El Paso, Gregory Ramos, conducted the oral interviews from 2000 to 2002 and subsequently wrote a poignant performance piece, “Border Voices,” inspired by the LGBTQ folks he interviewed. Of the twenty-five interviewees, seven were women, seventeen were men, and one was a transgender woman. Six of the seven women identified as Chicana, fronteriza, or Hispanic. One was white. Of the men, twelve identified as Chicano, Hispanic, or Mexicano; one was African American, one was Latino with parents from El Salvador, and three were white men.3 Overall, the majority of interviewees identified as Chicana/o, Mexican, or Hispanic. Those interviewed probably represent a cross-section of the predominantly Chicana/o and Mexican communities of El Paso, where seventy-eight percent of the population is of Mexican origin. Although some of the Chicano/a interviewees may have been born in Juárez or have family in Juárez, only one of the twenty-five said he was a Mexicano from Juárez. Although he lived in El Paso, his dual citizenship allowed his allegiance to México.4

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253014993

10. Yes Wii Can or Can Wii? Theorizing the Possibilities of Video Games as Health Disparity Intervention

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

David J. Leonard, Sarah Ullrich-French, and Thomas G. Power

THE DEBATE ABOUT EXERGAMING OFTEN APPEARS IN headlines such as “Can Wii Games Replace Regular Exercise?” and “Is the Wii Fit Better than Regular Exercise?”1 In this regard, virtual gaming has been reduced to a binary, a mathematical formula that treats participants as universal subjects and analyzes how well the games transport those bodies into virtual space. It reflects on whether these games have real-life impact on the universal game subject and how these virtual activities compare to their real-life brethren. Take one study from the American Council on Exercise, which after testing sixteen participants on six of Wii’s most challenging games – Free Run, Island Run, Free Step, Advanced Step, Super Hula Hoop, and Rhythm Boxing – concluded that virtual reality was distinctively different from the real world, in that twice as many calories were burned with the real “thing.” Emblematic of much of the discourse, the adherence to the virtual-real binary and its conceptualization of all participants as having equal access and opportunity demonstrate the shortcomings of the discourse surrounding virtual exercise.2 Furthering the establishment of this dualistic framework, the discourse focuses on the caloric impact–energy expenditure rates of virtual exercise games; it works to understand if exergaming is a substitute for real-world exercise. Yet there has been little effort to measure the impact of games on the physical body (core strength, balance) and, more important, the impact of games on identity, knowledge about fitness, health, and nutrition. In the end, these studies, more than the games themselves, disembody people and fail to look at how games change people in a myriad of ways, from the physical to the mental, from identity to self-worth.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

10 Your Blood, Your Sweat, Your Tears

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

As the summer of ’62 neared its end and Pete Gill found himself greeted ever more commonly with rank skepticism among Ireland townfolk, a natural tendency toward paranoia began gnawing at his mental health. Jim Roos was doing all he could to plant the seeds of optimism around the village, but there remained intense pockets of resistance. As Pete well knew, the most intense such pocket was located inside Tommy Schitter’s grocery and butcher shop only a few blocks from the high school. The fact that Tommy’s son Pat was regarded by many, including Jim Roos, as one of the best basketball prospects among an inexperienced but promising sophomore class only added to Pete’s mental disturbance. Irrationally, he concluded that the best solution would be to see to it that Pat did not make the team. Roy Allen, with whom Pete had otherwise quickly achieved a harmonious rapport, did not agree.

“You’ll be cutting off your nose to spite your face, Pete,” Roy said the day before fall classes were to begin. They were huddled together behind the locked door of the coach’s office in the gymnasium, amidst a cloud of cigarette smoke.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

11 Drill, Baby, Drill!

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

The Spuds played nine baseball games in the fall of 1962 and won eight, though their success owed less to the coaching of Pete Gill than to the superior talents of Dave Small. This was no surprise to anyone. Since his early childhood on the farm, Dave had devoted almost as much attention to baseball as to basketball. In September 1962, he pitched complete-game shutouts three times and led the team in batting average. The only disappointment was the team’s one loss, which came in the season finale against Chrisney and cost the Spuds the conference championship.

Success on the diamond, however, earned the players no reprieves on the practice field. Pete Gill never relaxed his backbreaking workouts, and the players’ regard for their coach improved not a whit. If anything, it only grew worse.

Neither did Pete, for his part, make much effort to win the affections of his players. In his mind the days on which baseball games were scheduled served only as inconvenient interruptions from the task at hand—which was, of course, to get ready for basketball. Knowing this, the players—with the exception of Red Keusch, that is—hardly relished the start of basketball season. A sense of dread would have been a more accurate description of their feelings. Dave Small and Joe Lents, who more than others had tasted the good life during the Dimp Stenftenagel era, resigned themselves to the expectation that their senior year of basketball would be a protracted state of misery, imprisoned in the confines of a madman’s torture chamber. They could not bring themselves to understand how a coach could seem so hell-bent on sucking every bit of fun out of playing the sport they loved so much.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

11 “Te Amo, Te Amo, Te Amo”: Lorenzo Antonio and Sparx Performing Nuevo México Music Peter J. García

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

PETER J. GARCÍA

It’s a hot summer afternoon and I am driving with my mother and my tío or her oldest brother heading west on Interstate 40 entering Albuquerque’s city limits following an intense extended family reunion held over the Fourth of July weekend held in my maternal ancestral village of el Torreon near Manzano, Abó, Chilili, Tajique, Estancia, and Mountainair in Torrance County. These picturesque New Mexican village communities remain hidden byways and represent some of the last bastions of the former Spanish pastoral rancheritos and former Mexican land grants from throughout the Río Abajo. Older Nuevomexicano residents remain rooted here and to the former ways of life that have survived now for centuries in a place twice colonized but which remains home to a unique raza heritage and a rooted, what Alicia Gaspar de Alba calls “alter-Native” Chicana/o culture with a unique New Mexican style in culinary and visual arts, architecture, music, language, and expressive culture. Throughout the entire Río Abajo, Mexicano settlements continue the older way of rural living with milpas, and similar to northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, further picturesque chains of village hamlets situated throughout the Sandía, Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, and Manzano mountain communities are located north, northeast, and directly east of Albuquerque. Many of my maternal family members and close relatives now live in Alburquerque but return often to the maternal village and my grandparents’ terreno for various family gatherings, solemn occasions, and fiestas.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

12 Soap and Towel and Wings of Fire

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

A week before the team’s season opener against Spurgeon, Pete had Jim Roos announce to students, parents, and public that there would be what he termed a “Soap and Towel” game, an exhibition scrimmage among Ireland players, Tuesday night prior to the Spurgeon game.

“But, Coach, this is nuts,” Dave Small pointed out. “We haven’t even scrimmaged full-court yet.”

“When I want your opinion, Small, I’ll ask for it.”

Dave said no more, but he could not imagine how the drills they had been doing in practice would translate into game conditions. His worst fear was an embarrassment in front of the whole town, but Pete would not be dissuaded. Pete wanted a show, a demonstration before all his detractors of what he was building. He overestimated, however, the readiness of his team.

Such an exhibition was a first for the town of Ireland. It was Pete’s idea that anyone could gain admission with a bar of soap or a towel, which he intended to stockpile for the team’s locker room supplies. Although hardly anyone expected to see high-quality basketball at the practice game, there was a great deal of curiosity about the team as tales of Pete’s bizarre and brutal practices had spread among townsfolk and even beyond. When Jack Brandt, sports director for Jasper radio station WITZ, heard about the game, he made plans to be there. Jasper athletic director Cabby O’Neill, on the other hand, decided it would be best not to attend, lest he be confused for an Ireland supporter, but he asked Jack to provide him with a full report on “this fellow Gill.”

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

12 Sonic Geographies and Anti-Border Musics: “We Didn’t Cross the Border, the Borders Crossed Us”

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

ROBERTO D. HERNÁNDEZ

What must be done is to restore this dream to its proper time . . . and to its proper place . . .

FRANTZ FANON (1967)

Strong whirling sounds grow louder and louder. The surrounding brush sways violently and is nearly uprooted. A helicopter hovering overhead nears, and you hear the desperate words, “Levántate compadre / ¿Que pasa? / ¿Oyes ese zumbido? / Si, compadre . . . es el helicóptero . . . / Métete debajo de esos matorrales . . . de volada, apúrate. / Híjole, se me hace que ya me agarraron / Eso es lo de menos compadre, se me hace que ya nos llevo, la que nos trajo compadre.”

(Get up compadre / What’s happening? / Do you hear that noise? / Yes, compadre . . . it’s the helicopter . . . / Get under those bushes . . . quickly, hurry up. / Oh shit, I think they got me . . . / that is the least of it, compadre . . . I think the one that’s taking us . . . is the one that brought us here, compadre.)1

The above exchange opens Tijuana NO’s 1998 hit song “La Migra,” whose land and soundscape bears an eerie resemblance to the terrain near my childhood home, where corrugated steel extends into the Pacific Ocean, creating a rhythmic rumbling sound as wave after wave crashes up against the U-S///México border2 wall in the area once known as Friendship Park.3

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

13 Highway 61 Revisited

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Game day arrived, and an unusually agitated Roy Allen stood in the doorway to Pete Gill’s office. “Pete, now you’ve really lost your mind! Hitchhiking home from Spurgeon? It’s nuts!”

Pete was studiously shuffling through a stack of index cards. He glanced up expressionless, then resumed the shuffling. “Did you see the looks on the boys’ faces, Roy? I think I got ’em stirred up.”

“I’m not worried about that. We will win the game,” Roy said. “As bad as we looked the other night, Spurgeon is likely to be several degrees worse. And if we play better, which is a real possibility, then it’s you and me I’m worried about, Pete.”

Pete did not look up. “Take it easy, Roy.”

“Listen, Pete, Spurgeon is thirty miles away. And there’s no direct route between here and there. You have to take a bunch of different roads. Hitchhiking so late at night is—well, it’s no simple matter.”

“I’m going to start Stan Klem,” Pete said, lifting out one of the cards. “Don’t you think he looked the best of what we got?”

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

13 Lila Downs’s Borderless Performance: Transculturation and Musical Communication Brenda M. Romero

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

BRENDA M. ROMERO

Suddenly, everyone is interested in Lila Downs! Her musical performances appeal to multiethnic, multilingual, and transnational audiences across hemispheres, gender boundaries, and musical cultures. These audiences include progressive academics, political activists, and radical artists with political consciences. Who is this remarkable new vocalist/ composer? Lila Downs made her debut into the mainstream with four song credits in the acclaimed film Frida,1 where she appears singing in the tango and bedside scenes. Certainly her proximity to the Frida cult via the movie has led her to capitalize on the pop cultural Frida image, as her critics are quick to notice, but Lila also claims indigenous ancestry, holds a bachelor’s degree in anthropology on Oaxacan textiles, and is a musical activist. Lila Downs is the daughter of a Caucasian father and a Mixtec2 mother; she straddles the middle of a divided world. This essay celebrates Lila Downs’s artistic contributions and proposes that she offers a truly new brand of musical performance that not only represents her own journey of personal discovery but also integrates diverse musical ideas and fuses deeply layered indigenous ideas and beliefs about music with sounds and lyrical imagery. The result is truly engaging for listeners on both sides of the US–México border.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

14 El Macho: How the Women of Teatro Luna Became Men Paloma Martínez-Cruz & Liza Ann Acosta

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

PALOMA MARTÍNEZ-CRUZ & LIZA ANN ACOSTA

ma·cho adj
having or showing characteristics conventionally regarded as typically male, especially physical strength and courage, aggressiveness, and lack of emotional response

n
a male who displays conventionally typical masculine characteristics1

If we accept Schechner’s claim that performance is “twice behaved behavior,” we must then ask, what is the force of that repetition?2

PEGGY PHELAN, THE ENDS OF PERFORMANCE

The play Machos, created and performed by Teatro Luna, Chicago’s all-Latina theatre company, illuminates the project of el macho. Accepting performance as “twice behaved behavior,” Machos interrogates the echoes of patriarchal conventions by dramatizing the boundaries of normative masculinity. The force compelling repetition of el macho’s gestures, vocabulary, and drives is immediate and all-encompassing: minutes into the play, the cast, donning contemporary urban Latino drag, tells us, “I learned it from my dad.” Socialization of the macho begins at birth and is reinforced at every juncture with pressures from peer groups, by mass communication, and by intimate relations and strangers alike. To relinquish any aspect of the performance of machismo is to be deemed less than a man. Our paper on Teatro Luna’s staged iteration of this high-stakes repertoire submits that the company’s performance of gender is a political act that ultimately awakens audience members to their own complicity in the construal of machismo: the revelation that gender is a ritual, rather than a biological imperative, implies that we are each an officiant laying down the liturgy of el macho. As an anti-oppression theater project, the ultimate aim of Machos is to denaturalize the binary construct of woman/man that habilitates patriarchal hegemony and to activate new social engagement with gender and sexuality as a dynamic continuum, a process of becoming, rather than a state of being.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

14 The Buy In

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Everyone was aware that Ireland’s second opponent, the Holland Dutchmen, would be a far sterner test for the Spuds and Pete Gill than Spurgeon had been. In fact, they were likely to be one of the most difficult opponents on the entire schedule. Holland had several returning starters, led by big men Butch Fenneman and Bill Buse, and many experts in the area favored them not only to replace Ireland atop the Patoka Valley Conference but to be a genuine small-school threat to capture the Huntingburg Sectional title. Thus, Pete Gill began ruminating on strategy against them almost as soon as he returned home from Spurgeon.

It helped that his support among students and townsfolk was now growing, even if only incrementally, in the wake of the victory over Spurgeon. The hitchhiking stunt had not only motivated his team but had also won him a few new fans, who found him at least to be more entertaining than his predecessor. Whether he was truly a better basketball coach would remain an open question.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

15 Devil in Blue Jeans

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Jim Roos was pleased to see a remarkable difference in the atmosphere in Ireland High School the following Monday morning. The pall of gloom that had hung over the building since the beginning of fall classes was gone, and in its place was a mood of sunny optimism, focus, and anticipation. Everything seemed brighter now in the light of the two season-opening wins. Students were more attentive and respectful of their teachers, the buzz in the hallways between classes was louder and more energized, and even janitor John Radke took greater pride in his work. And the generalized optimism was only enhanced by the Spuds’ third game, a road contest against nonconference opponent English, which offered no special difficulty and required no special strategy or stunts to motivate the players. The team cruised to an easy twenty-point win, 65–45, and now stood 3–0, although they faced next a challenging match with the Monroe City Blue Jeans, a home game on Tuesday before Thanksgiving.

Rapidly Pete Gill was becoming the talk of the town. In these early weeks of the season, he began to make a habit after practice of stopping for coffee and friendly chatter at Ame Leinenbach’s cafe. Although, on occasion, Pete had privately sampled some of Morris Weidenbenner’s home brew or would sneak a beer at Wop Fritsch’s tavern in Jasper, he had so far carefully avoided public consumption of alcoholic beverages in Ireland. Roy Allen, on the other hand, while only a moderate drinker, never tried to hide his consumption of alcohol, and in fact he frequently tended bar for Ame as summer employment, which had caused Roy some difficulty when Tommy Schitter was township trustee.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

15 Suturing Las Ramblas to East LA: Transnational Performances of Josefina López’s Real Women Have Curves

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

TIFFANY ANA LÓPEZ

In the lexicon of media and visual culture, the term “suturing” describes the process by which a director or artist strategically connects various scenes by positioning them as mutually informative parts of a larger whole. The author makes full understanding of separate scenes contingent on reading them in conversation with one another; to ignore this crafted signaling is to refuse the lens of reading cast by the director or artist and, subsequently, to read narrowly and miss the full mark of the text.

Suturing is especially relevant to Josefina López’s Real Women Have Curves, a play about women working in a garment factory sewing dresses they themselves cannot wear because the dresses are both priced and sized out of their range. Sewing carries much artistic and critical force as a consistently deployed action, metaphor, and theme. It emphasizes how the play’s characters share their aspirations and struggles. Furthermore, López uses it to signify how several issues of violence, most especially economic and representational violence, are basted together via the mythos of the American dream.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

16 Coal for Christmas

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

A confrontation with an unsolved mystery generally tended to feed Pete Gill’s paranoid inclinations. And in Pete’s mind, there was no greater mystery at this time than the mystery of Joe Lents. One day after the boys had all gone home from practice, Pete was sitting in his office ruminating on Joe, and the more he ruminated, the more he could not resist a stroll into the dressing room to snoop into Joe’s locker. What he found justified the mission—in his mind, at least. On the top shelf were three bottles of prescription medications. Although the drug names were not familiar to him, he took note of the prescriber—Dr. Charles Klamer of Jasper—then stuffed the bottles into his coat pocket and drove home.

Joe’s sister Doty worked as a nurse in Klamer’s office. When Joe arrived in Ireland as a freshman, he was seriously underweight and malnourished. He often complained of fatigue and, not surprisingly, given the trauma of his childhood, suffered from chronic depression. Doty asked her boss to examine her little brother, and Dr. Klamer prescribed a regimen of vitamin and mineral supplements, most importantly iron pills for anemia. He may also have prescribed a mild antidepressant.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

16 Loving Revolution: Same-Sex Marriage and Queer Resistance in Monica Palacios’s Amor y Revolución

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

MARIVEL T. DANIELSON

The brilliant campaigning and historic outcome of the 2008 United States presidential election resonated on local and global levels, shattering—in the views of many—the glass ceilings hovering just above the heads of people of color in the United States. Yet amidst the echoes of celebration, a multitude of voters watched in disbelief as the passing of California Proposition 8 stripped away the rights of same-sex couples to legally marry—a right recognized by the state Supreme Court in May 2008. For nearly six months, queer couples across the state had enjoyed equal access to the rite and rights of marriage before this proposition reversed the historic court ruling.1 Los Angeles–based Chicana writer and performer Monica Palacios staged her dissenting voice in the form of protest performance. Palacios’s treatment of same-sex marriage and Proposition 8 first appeared in an updated version of her one-woman show Greetings from a Queer Señorita that ran for four weeks in Santa Ana, CA, in summer 2008.2 In October 2008 at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, CA, Palacios merged the new pieces on same-sex marriage from Greetings to create Amor y Revolución, a silly, sex-laced, and politically charged romp through this defining political milieu for queer Californians.3 From political propaganda to popular reception, Palacios’s performances confront the issue of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer4 rights through the reinscribed metaphor of revolution—a war and a fight for the right to love. Transcending the language of violence and combat, Palacios’s works seize a productive theatrical space of revolutionary love in the face of hateful media representation, legislation, and political campaigning. Invoking Augusto Boal and Gloria Anzaldúa’s living discourse on theater and theory, I will discuss how Palacios’s performances fashion an interstitial space of queer reinscription, coalition, and inspiration for queer and Latina/o communities.

See All Chapters

Load more