162 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 1 - Texas Prisons: A Pattern of Neglect

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

Like a horrid nightmare.

—Edward King, 1874

DURING the years of the Texas Prison Rodeo, spectators came not just to watch the rodeo activities but also to observe a prison demimonde that seemed dangerous if not exotic, giving rodeo goers the chance to interact with inmates, though safely separated by a wire mesh fence. But as will be described below, this was just the latest flourish in a legacy of “prison tourism” as old as America's first prisons. The inauguration of the Texas Prison Rodeo in 1931 would introduce a new form of prison tourism that allowed free-world spectators to pay a small fee to vicariously participate in the prison experience, albeit with the expectation of leaving through the gates they had just entered when the tour was over. However, no matter what visitors witnessed at the Texas Prison Rodeos, or for that matter any other prisons, it was mere window dressing, since like all prisons, Huntsville's walls were meant not just to “keep prisoners in,” but to “keep the public out.”1

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253008589

Indiana AT Evansville, 11-16-11 (94-73)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Cody Zeller (40) tries to lay the ball in as Evansville Aces guard/forward Kenneth Harris (32) defends during the Indiana Evansville basketball game at the Ford Center in Evansville, Ind., Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011.

By Dustin Dopirak

After Indiana’s surgical evisceration of Evansville on Wednesday night, the question posed to Tom Crean and his players sounded like a reasonable one.

In Crean’s four years, the Hoosiers had won games by bigger margins and earned victories of much more gravity against much stronger teams. But those more important victories were mostly nailbiters, and none of those blowouts came against a team as respectable as this Evansville squad, which was coming off a 16-16 season in the revered Missouri Valley Conference and a season opening win over Butler.

So was IU’s 94-73 win at Evansville in front of 9,640 at the brand new Ford Center the Hoosiers’ best all-around performance in Crean’s three-plus years of rebuilding?

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253014993

7. Keeping It Real: Sports Video Game Advertising and the Fan-Consumer

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

Cory Hillman and Michael L. Butterworth

IN THE UNITED STATES, FEW, IF ANY, CULTURAL ACTIVITIES, products, or experiences are immune to the often unrestrained hands of commercialism, marketing, and advertising in the ambitious and overzealous pursuit of audiences and consumers. Sports are especially subject to these conditions, evidenced by the following examples: advertisers spent approximately $10.9 billion on national sports broadcasts between the final quarter of 2010 through September 2011; NBC paid the International Olympic Committee $2.2 billion to broadcast the 2010 and 2012 Winter and Summer Olympics; CBS and Turner Broadcasting agreed to pay nearly $11 billion to the NCAA for the rights to the annual men’s college basketball tournament. Divisional realignment in college football has also been stimulated by the desire to create “megaconferences” in the chase for lucrative television packages with major networks, and the NCAA’s decision to determine its national champion of college football’s Football Bowl Subdivision with a four-team playoff beginning in 2014 came with estimates that the tournament could be worth as much as $6 billion.1 Meanwhile, fans spent $3.2 billion on Major League Baseball (MLB) team merchandise in 2011, marking an 8.1 percent increase from the previous season, and the typical NFL fan spends approximately $60 on apparel, snacks, and other merchandise during the week of the Super Bowl.2

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253008589

Indiana AT Nebraska, 1-18-12 (69-70)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Cody Zeller (40) pump fakes Nebraska Cornhuskers guard Bo Spencer (23) and Nebraska Cornhuskers guard Brandon Richardson (3) during the Indiana Nebraska men’s basketball game at the Bob Devaney Arena in Lincoln, Neb.

By Dustin Dopirak

When Jordan Hulls’ desperation heave off his own miss clanked off the backboard and the rim, the Indiana Hoosiers found out what it was like to have the court stormed on them.

Unlike the Kentucky players who found themselves toppled during the mayhem at Assembly Hall on Dec. 10, the Hoosiers had plenty of room Wednesday night to trudge off the Devaney Center floor unmolested with heads hanging and despondent facial expressions after the 70-69 loss. Nebraska’s court-storming barely filled the large block “N” at center court, let alone the entire floor like Hoosier fans did on a night that suddenly seems like a distant memory.

Despite building a 13-point second-half lead, the No. 11 Hoosiers never put away Nebraska, and the underdog Cornhuskers made sure they suffered the consequences of that failure. The normally automatic Hulls missed a critical front end of a set of 1-and-1 free throws with 19 seconds to go. Nebraska center Jorge Brian Diaz made two foul shots to give the Huskers a one-point lead with 11 seconds left, and Hulls missed on a layup and a 3-pointer on the game’s final possession to give Big Ten newcomer Nebraska the win in front of 8,613.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253014993

3. Neoliberal Masculinity: The Government of Play and Masculinity in E-Sports

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

Gerald Voorhees

We’re at a point where only about forty people in the U.S. can make a living playing video games. I’d like to get it to a hundred. I think we’re a year or two away from that.

SUNDANCE DIGIOVANNI, quoted in Richard Nieva,
“Video Gaming on the Pro Tour for Glory but Little
Gold,” New York Times, November 28, 2012

While scholars have begun to investigate the professionalization of gaming, I take it on only to the extent that it is an exemplary site for thinking about the sportification of digital games, a broader sociocultural phenomenon that emerges at the juncture of neoliberal rationality and distinct – often competing – constructions of masculinity circulating in contemporary Western culture. Indeed, the sportification of digital games has led to the creation of national leagues, international tournaments, and corporate-sponsored teams of professional cyberathletes, but it is not rooted in these institutions or in the professionalization of players; rather, they are both effects of the hegemony of the sportive mentality. The games are objective things defined by protocological affordances and constrains, but their status as sport and the practices constituting the process of sportification are a result of the meaning attributed to them by player and fan communities.1 In this chapter I examine the cultural implications of the figuration of digital games as sports, often called e-sports, focusing on the production of an intelligible subject position at the nexus of neoliberalism and masculinity.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

1 Gloomsday

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

On the morning of Saturday, June 16, 1962, the sun rose over southern Indiana like an orange Rawlings basketball, but by midday it had morphed into an angry yellow seed hanging hot and sour over the tiny hamlet of Ireland, where the mood was decidedly glum. Coach Jerome “Dimp” Stenftenagel, beloved by nearly everyone in and around the village of some four hundred souls, had tendered his resignation at the end of the school year, following six consecutive winning seasons. In the last three, he had amassed a total of 59 wins against only six losses and had gone undefeated in the Patoka Valley Conference. These were easily the three winningest seasons in Ireland High School history, which stretched back to 1915.

Unfortunately, like every Ireland coach who had come before him, Dimp had never won a Sectional, had never gotten past the first round of the storied free-for-all Indiana state tournament. And like all but one Ireland coach before him, he had never beaten Jasper, the Spuds’ big and reviled neighbor to the east. And now nearly everyone in Ireland recognized that 1962 had been Dimp’s best chance—their best chance—maybe for a long time, because that tall and talented starting front line of Dave Baer, Ronnie Vonderheide, and Bill Small had graduated and was gone, and the replacements—most at least a head shorter than Baer, Vonderheide, and Small—were not promising. The golden era was finished.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253008589

Ncaa Tournament: Indiana VS. VCU, 3-17-12 (63-61)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Will Sheehey (10) celebrates the Hoosier win during the Indiana Virginia Commonwealth 2012 NCAA Men’s Basketball third round game at the Rose Garden in Portland, Ore., Saturday, March 17, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

Will Sheehey grabbed the ball on the left baseline after Victor Oladipo’s shot was blocked and flashed an involuntary smile, because he knew.

It mattered not that the sophomore swingman was in perhaps the biggest pressure situation of his basketball career, or that the shot he was about to take could be the one that either continued Indiana’s magical 2011-12 season with a dramatic late comeback or led to its eventual end. When he gets that look, that wide open, it goes in. Every time.

“Will’s mid-range is almost automatic,” Oladipo said. “When he shot it, I knew it was going in as soon as it left his hands.”

It did, and then on the other end, Virginia Commonwealth guard Rob Brandenberg’s 3-pointer for the win hit off the front of the rim — and after hanging above it for a perceived eternity — fell over the back end to give the No. 4 Hoosiers a breathtaking 63-61 NCAA Tournament victory over the No. 12 seed Rams, a berth in the Sweet 16 and a rematch with No. 1 Kentucky.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253014993

4. The Social and Gender in Fantasy Sports Leagues

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

Luke Howie and Perri Campbell

Since the mid-1990s, fantasy sports participation has grown at a significant rate. According to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, just under thirty-two million people over twelve years old play fantasy sports in North America (including Canada). In the United Kingdom, two million people participate in fantasy Premier League soccer games.1 The financial impact of fantasy sports is measured in billions of euros and dollars.2 Most people cite early 1980s rotisserie baseball leagues as the precursors to the contemporary online fantasy sports experience, but there is some evidence that rudimentary forms of fantasy sports have existed since the mid-1950s.3

In this chapter we provide an account of ongoing research being conducted with the members of a long-running fantasy NBA league based in Australia and their wives and partners. The league began in the late 1990s as a hobby for ten friends who had attended high school or college together, and all played competitive basketball, some to professional and semiprofessional levels. It is played online but features many offline supplementary activities, including a live offline draft party, elaborate mechanisms for choosing the draft order (referred to by participants as the “lottery”), and detailed, ongoing discussions about strategies, statistics, and trades taking place year-round. There are benefits to understanding fantasy sports as a site for advertising and marketing, as gambling, and as a problematic regulatory field.4 We are studying fantasy sports leagues as a social occurrence that takes place in online and offline realms where gender matters and takes various hegemonic forms.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253002952

3 The Other Train That Derails Us: Performing Latina Anxiety Disorder in “The Night before Christmas”

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

ANGIE CHABRAM-DERNERSESIAN

Anxiety is an activation of our senses and our physical readiness so we can assess our surroundings or look for dangers—and so we can be more ready to run or fight. Like the flashing red lights and crossing guards that come down over a railroad track when the train—still miles away—goes over a switch.

DR. J., “ANXIETY, PRACTICALLY SPEAKING

After a hard day’s work, Doña Elena sits down to watch her favorite telenovela, armed with a piping hot cup of café con leche (coffee with milk) and her favorite pan dulce (pastry). She has much company in this much-awaited daily ritual, according to transnational studies of Spanish media culture (see, e.g., LaPastina n.d.).1 Across Latina/o America, viewers of Spanish-language television—men, women, and children alike—join her in savoring yet another installment of this hugely popular televisual genre.

In this particular instance, not long after a reprise of the previous day’s melodramatic plot line, Doña Elena’s television ritual is rudely interrupted by a program change. In a programmed announcement, Doña Elena and her fellow viewers are met head-on with the image of a larger-than-life train that threatens to barrel out of control, lunging out of the small screen and engulfing their bodies, spirits, and home spaces. The burning light of the train offers no escape from televisual darkness or human entrapment. Viewers are thus caught unawares, somehow right in front of the path of the monumental, horrific train, provoking a primal urge to flee or seek protection—what therapists call the “flight syndrome.”2

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414615

Flies

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Flies

Closely related to horses and ponies are, of course, flies. They come with the territory. On a nice warm day a deposit of fresh horse turds will have a thousand flies on it before it hits the ground. I think the flies watch the horse and know when he’s ready to let go, then mill around the exit and grab hold on the way down, fighting for the best spots. Some experts say the fly larvae live in the horse’s bowels and spring to life when the manure lands in the dirt. I doubt that the fly larvae cause much distress to the horse from inside, but once outside, the battle begins, and the horseshoer is right in the middle.

I certainly don’t pretend to know anything technical or scientific about flies, but from my position at ground level, I can describe several kinds and I will tell some stories about each and the battle waged against them by horse and shoer.

The most prominent buzzing nemesis looks like a regular housefly, and for all I know, it is. These flies don’t give up easily. They generally swarm around the feet and ankles of the horse and sometimes get so engrossed (an appropriate word) in the often bloody feast that you can squash them right on the horse. If you wave them off, they rise about an inch and jump right back on. These flies won’t bother a leg that is being held by the shoer, but that leaves three other legs for them to assault. And that’s where the trouble starts. There is no way an average horse is going to stand quietly with one foot in the shoer’s lap and three feet on the ground being eaten by flies. You can yell and shout and insult the horse for wriggling around, but the horse is simply not going to stand still under this kind of fly attack. All of this limits the options for the shoer. Assuming there is no fly spray (more about that later), the shoer will probably try to get as much work done as possible on a foot before the horse reaches the limits of its tolerance and breaks loose, scattering horseshoer and tools.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

17 I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Someone had put coal in the Spuds’ Christmas stockings. Mercifully Pete did not force the team to practice on Christmas Day, but he held practice on Christmas Eve and on the day after Christmas and on every other day over Christmas break. The practices were every bit as merciless as they had been in the preseason, if not more so. Pete, however, backed off from any special focus on Joe Lents, who nevertheless retreated into a quiet funk, while the rest of the team waited for him to return his head to winning basketball. It would take a while.

Joe was not about to get over the incident quickly. In January and February, his scoring markedly declined from the sixteen points he was averaging per game prior to the tourney. Most games he barely reached double figures. Before the holidays, Joe was fourth in the conference in scoring. By the end of the regular season, he had dropped to ninth. This was not the way he had wanted his senior season to go, but he just could not get himself motivated to play his best for Pete Gill.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253010285

13 Highway 61 Revisited

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Game day arrived, and an unusually agitated Roy Allen stood in the doorway to Pete Gill’s office. “Pete, now you’ve really lost your mind! Hitchhiking home from Spurgeon? It’s nuts!”

Pete was studiously shuffling through a stack of index cards. He glanced up expressionless, then resumed the shuffling. “Did you see the looks on the boys’ faces, Roy? I think I got ’em stirred up.”

“I’m not worried about that. We will win the game,” Roy said. “As bad as we looked the other night, Spurgeon is likely to be several degrees worse. And if we play better, which is a real possibility, then it’s you and me I’m worried about, Pete.”

Pete did not look up. “Take it easy, Roy.”

“Listen, Pete, Spurgeon is thirty miles away. And there’s no direct route between here and there. You have to take a bunch of different roads. Hitchhiking so late at night is—well, it’s no simple matter.”

“I’m going to start Stan Klem,” Pete said, lifting out one of the cards. “Don’t you think he looked the best of what we got?”

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414615

Insensitivity?

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Insensitivity?

Some customers are more insensitive than others. One particular gentleman called for an appointment for two shoeings. When I asked how the horses behaved, he said, “Well, you can pick up their feet.” That should have been a gigantic red flag to me, but being short of cash, I said I would come out there.

I drive for an hour and a half through some delightful woods and hills and arrive right on time. The ranch is large and well kept. There is a huge barn and a lot of tractors and other farm machinery around the barn and the house. A trampoline is beside the barn. My only greeters, however, are a serious-looking Bull Mastiff who is not wagging his tail, and three barefoot children whose ages turn out to be two, four, and six, who have been jumping on the unsupervised trampoline. Two girls and an older boy. No adults in sight. I do not get out of the truck. The three children and the dog stare at me. I’m obviously some kind of novelty. I wait. Our conversation doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, and the dog has not taken his eyes off of me. I finally ask the boy to go get his mother. He gives it some thought, and finally wanders off in the direction of the house. Eventually, his mother comes back with him, and all four of them and the dog stare at me. The mother turns out to be the daughter of the man who called me, but she knows nothing about any of this. She has no idea who I am or where her father is. I tell her I’m the shoer.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781626567719

5 Reframing from Anxiety to Taking Control

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

You are a professional glove hitter. Hit the glove!

—RICK PETERSON

There are many things about pressure situations which cause our anxiety levels to rise. The reasons include, but aren’t limited to, these:

We focus on goals or factors outside of our control.

We focus on outcomes rather than the process to achieve those outcomes.

We get overwhelmed by the perceived difficulty of the task.

We commit to doing too much.

Our expectations are too high because we use the wrong measuring stick.

We exaggerate the importance of the situation.

In this chapter, we share a number of antidotes to pressure that will lower your anxiety levels and put you back in control.

At the beginning of spring training every year, Rick asks his pitchers, “What’s your goal?” Most of the answers given center around outcomes like winning a certain number of games, or pitching a certain number of innings. Rick takes these answers as an opportunity to teach a lesson in goal setting. While many of us have been taught to set lofty, long-term-outcome goals, the type that show up on the back of a baseball card or a company financial statement, these goals are overrated in comparison to lesser-appreciated, short-term, bite-sized process goals.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253008589

Sheehey, Oladipo Bring Own Brand of Energy to IU

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

By Dustin Dopirak

If someone on the team was ever going to be inflamed enough by an opponent’s press-conference quote to call that player out on it, the Indiana Hoosiers knew it would be Will Sheehey.

And there he was on Thursday night, wearing a stone-cold expression that belied the fact that the Hoosiers had just won their first NCAA Tournament game, calling out New Mexico State’s Wendell McKines.

“He said some things in the press conference earlier that were a little questionable,” Sheehey said after IU’s 79-66 win on Thursday. “So we took it upon ourselves that he didn’t get those touches. He said something about no mammal can guard him or something like that. So I guess Victor (Oladipo) is not human.”

Injured senior guard Verdell Jones III just laughed when he heard that one.

“He told me after he said it, I was like ‘Oh, Lord, you’re gonna get us all in trouble,’” Jones said. “That’s just Will for you. If you knew Will at all, you wouldn’t be surprised if he said that.”

See All Chapters

Load more