219 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574414615

More Pig Stories

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

More Pig Stories

Some of my best horse customers lived up in the hills of Northern California where horses were a way of life. We lived there, too. The houses and ranches were spread out and most people had plenty of room for horses used for working cattle and sheep, for pleasure riding, and for shows, fairs, and rodeos. It was horse country. It was also wild pig country. Almost everybody in the county had some kind of wild pig story where the storyteller had been chased through the woods and into the house, where pig and person raced around the house until the person jumped on top of the refrigerator in a final effort to save their skin. About half of these storytellers could show you the scars from the pig attack. The stories and scars all seemed to be authentic.

My stories aren’t nearly as exciting. I seldom saw any wild pigs, but I saw signs of them. I raised a lot of rabbits that we either sold to pet shops or ate, and after slaughtering the ones for eating, I would throw the hides, guts, heads, and feet over a fence into the woods. By the following morning there would be no trace of any of this. The pigs came down and ate everything. Once I found a tail that had been overlooked, but everything else, skulls and all, had been eaten. I knew it was pigs and not vultures, because I could see the tracks. These pigs were also a nuisance to the sheep ranchers because the pigs became so bold as to start eating a birthing lamb before it had even fully emerged.

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Medium 9780253002952

3 The Other Train That Derails Us: Performing Latina Anxiety Disorder in “The Night before Christmas”

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

ANGIE CHABRAM-DERNERSESIAN

Anxiety is an activation of our senses and our physical readiness so we can assess our surroundings or look for dangers—and so we can be more ready to run or fight. Like the flashing red lights and crossing guards that come down over a railroad track when the train—still miles away—goes over a switch.

DR. J., “ANXIETY, PRACTICALLY SPEAKING

After a hard day’s work, Doña Elena sits down to watch her favorite telenovela, armed with a piping hot cup of café con leche (coffee with milk) and her favorite pan dulce (pastry). She has much company in this much-awaited daily ritual, according to transnational studies of Spanish media culture (see, e.g., LaPastina n.d.).1 Across Latina/o America, viewers of Spanish-language television—men, women, and children alike—join her in savoring yet another installment of this hugely popular televisual genre.

In this particular instance, not long after a reprise of the previous day’s melodramatic plot line, Doña Elena’s television ritual is rudely interrupted by a program change. In a programmed announcement, Doña Elena and her fellow viewers are met head-on with the image of a larger-than-life train that threatens to barrel out of control, lunging out of the small screen and engulfing their bodies, spirits, and home spaces. The burning light of the train offers no escape from televisual darkness or human entrapment. Viewers are thus caught unawares, somehow right in front of the path of the monumental, horrific train, provoking a primal urge to flee or seek protection—what therapists call the “flight syndrome.”2

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Medium 9781574411607

Part Two Day 3

Geraldine Ellis Watson University of North Texas Press PDF

Reflections on the Neches

Part Two

Day 3

THIRD DAY

River Mile 86

8:30 A.M.

Next morning, after an uneventful night, I launched off and stopped at the next cutbank bend and climbed the bluff, planning to explore an inland lake called Morgan Lake. The once magnificent forests adjacent to the river here have been clearcut and the rough road, which led from the bluff toward the forests, fanned out in numerous branches into the clearcut. I was unable to locate the lake, but did find something else more interesting. Where the soil had eroded along the road leading from the bluff, I found flint chips, bits of charcoal, and pottery shards, which indicated that this bluff had been an Indian habitation site. All these bluffs where the river cut into higher terraces must have been inhabited by the aborigines. I would have liked to spend more time exploring here but planned to spend the night at the Eason camp and wasn’t sure how long it would take me to get there, so I proceeded on my way.

SMITH’S BEND

River Mile 84

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Medium 9781574413205

Fishing Texas: A Passion Passed on by My Dad

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch01.pdf

10/6/11

8:14 AM

Page 51

FISHING TEXAS: A PASSION

PASSED ON BY MY DAD by Jim Harris

In any one genre of Texas fishing, I’m going to come up short, lacking in enthusiasm and skills to hold any fishing records. Say, large mouth bass fishing in tournament-quality lakes. I’ve done some of it over the years, and even been in the same boat with professional fishermen piloting bass boats that cost $40,000. But I’ve not done enough of it to say I fished that way with a passion and wanted to do it night and day.

Or fishing for large catfish in a river. I’ve done a little of it, even in some places using old gallon milk jugs tied together with fifty yards of trotline weighted down with treble hooks loaded with chicken gizzards. I can truly enjoy floating down a slow-moving river checking lines, some of them hanging from a tree branch, but

I wouldn’t say that I ever developed an insatiable desire for that kind of fishing, either.

And I enjoy wading out into the surf with a floating shrimp bucket tied to a belt and casting a handful of lead weights out into the gulf as far as my 1950s saltwater rod and reel will allow me. In those salty waters, I’ve caught my share of speckled trout and a fair number of red fish over the years in this summertime ritual, but I never dreamed about the sunburned arms and the spray in the face on winter nights. If I ever had dreams about the jellyfish that one year grabbed hold of my right calf while I waded in the surf, those dreams were nightmares that I thankfully forgot by morning.

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Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 10 - The Texas Prison Rodeo Goes Hollywood (1960–1964)

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

The Texas Prison Rodeo Goes Hollywood (1960–1964)

“The state should pay for stuff the rodeo paid for.”

—George Beto, c. 1962

IN the 1950s, most Americans equated Texas with cattle culture and perhaps the last vestiges of the mythic western frontier. But the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 would impact not just the national consciousness, but the way Americans viewed the Lone Star State as well. Indeed, many observers commented that the series of tragic events that unfolded in Dallas symbolized a Texas where other forces were at work, more Deep South than Wild West, a place that the rest of the nation increasingly linked with “bigotry, backwardness and backlash.”1

As the Texas prison system moved into the 1960s, it remained like many of the “warm weather gulags of the South,” overcrowded and still playing catch-up with the modern era. One observer even prosaically suggested that these “plantation prisons” including Angola, Louisiana, Parchman, Mississippi, and the Texas prison system, “remained fixed in a terrible social amber, mostly unchanged since the post-Reconstruction boom years of Southern corrections.”2 In the 1960s, perhaps seen as a move toward distinguishing Texas from other southern agricultural prison systems, the prison “farms” were rechristened prison units, but this did little to change conditions. Prisoners, violent and non-violent alike, continued to languish in dorms out on the prison farm units, where they were sustained with what passed for food and inadequate medical care, while guarded by the ever-present trustees, who remained free to abuse and exploit fellow inmates, all in the name of keeping order.

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Medium 9780253008589

Big Ten Tournament: Indiana VS. Penn State, 3-8-12 (75-58)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers guard Jordan Hulls (1) lays the ball in during the Indiana Penn State men’s basketball game at the Big Ten Tournament at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, Ind., Thursday, March 8, 2012. Indiana won 75-58.

By Dustin Dopirak

Even though it was expected, this was a win Indiana should’ve been able to bask in. The fifth-seeded Hoosiers’ 75-58 victory over No. 12 seed Penn State in front of 17,936 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in the first round of the Big Ten Tournament represented yet another milestone for this resurgent squad.

It was Indiana’s first Big Ten Tournament victory since 2006, a slump that not only included the first three seasons of the Tom Crean era but also both of Kelvin Sampson’s years at the helm.

But the tears Crean was fighting back in postgame interviews were not tears of joy. Indiana couldn’t enjoy the victory quite as much, because someone who had seen all the tough times was missing from the bench at game’s end.

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Medium 9780253008589

Sheehey, Oladipo Bring Own Brand of Energy to IU

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

By Dustin Dopirak

If someone on the team was ever going to be inflamed enough by an opponent’s press-conference quote to call that player out on it, the Indiana Hoosiers knew it would be Will Sheehey.

And there he was on Thursday night, wearing a stone-cold expression that belied the fact that the Hoosiers had just won their first NCAA Tournament game, calling out New Mexico State’s Wendell McKines.

“He said some things in the press conference earlier that were a little questionable,” Sheehey said after IU’s 79-66 win on Thursday. “So we took it upon ourselves that he didn’t get those touches. He said something about no mammal can guard him or something like that. So I guess Victor (Oladipo) is not human.”

Injured senior guard Verdell Jones III just laughed when he heard that one.

“He told me after he said it, I was like ‘Oh, Lord, you’re gonna get us all in trouble,’” Jones said. “That’s just Will for you. If you knew Will at all, you wouldn’t be surprised if he said that.”

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Medium 9780253010285

22 The Prophet’s Vision

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

While the Ireland players recouped what strength they could on the south side of town, young Jim Jones roomed his players northward at a Jasper motel. While many witnesses of the afternoon games had been amazed at the efficiency with which the Blackhawks had dispensed with Jasper and therefore regarded them as clear-cut favorites over the smaller Spuds, Jones was by no means as certain he had the better team. When a Jasper sportswriter asked him before the Sectional about his team’s up-and-down season, he had replied, “Up and down? Heck, it was just down, in my view. We aren’t very good.” Jones was learning the ropes—that is, how to lower expectations for his team and sucker opponents into taking them lightly.

The sportswriter caught up with him between games to see if his thoughts had changed. “My thoughts,” Jones replied, “are that Ireland outmans us at every position.”

“Come now, Jim. They’ve got no one who can stop Ziegler.”

“They know how to play defense, and Small and Lents more than make up for any lack of size they have. I doubt our young guys can stay with them.”

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Medium 9781574411607

Part Two Day 2

Geraldine Ellis Watson University of North Texas Press PDF

Part Two, Day 1

Part Two

Day 2

SECOND DAY

River Mile 89.5

That second morning simply could not have been surpassed for beauty. Where everything turns a rich, rosy gold at evening, the mornings are silver and pearl. Mist covers the river and the sun, rising into an opalescent sky, strikes the dew drops that cover every leaf, twig, and branch, and turns them to flashing diamonds. It is interesting to know that dew neither “falls” nor “rises.”

During the day, the sun heats the earth. At night, the air cools and the earth radiates heat back into the atmosphere, condensing water in the air one molecule at a time on objects that have a lower temperature than the air. There is no dew underneath objects, as even a leaf can prevent the radiant heat from rising.

There were no fresh animal tracks on the sandbar that morning. After the crows advertised my presence the evening before, all the forest knew that

MAN was on the sandbar and avoided it. This is a good reason for barring camping on sandbars except in designated areas.

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Medium 9780253002952

Introduction Toward a De-Colonial Performatics of the US Latina and Latino Borderlands

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

CHELA SANDOVAL, ARTURO J. ALDAMA, AND PETER J. GARCÍA

Latinas and Latinos represent the largest and fastest-growing ethnic community in the United States after “non-Hispanic” Whites (14 percent of the US population, approximately 55 million people in 2010).1 Yet the cultural impact of US Latina and Latino aesthetic production has yet to be fully recognized within the US nation-state and beyond. This book moves beyond the by now de-politicized and all-too-familiar cultural theory of the twentieth century and beyond so-called “radicalized” examples of aesthetic production to unravel how culture is performance. Moreover, the following chapters travel beyond the linguistic surfaces and aesthetic limitations of “Latina and Latino” cultural production to reveal the less familiar and unexplored performance terrains of the “Borderlands.” Indeed, Performing the US Latina and Latino Borderlands is a book that challenges readers to engage those profound intercultural, psychic, social, and transnational effects that are being generated through US Latina and Latino testimonio, theater, ceremony, ritual, storytelling, music, dance, improvisation, play, nagualisma-o, call-and-response, spoken-word, visual, body, digital, and sculptural enactments. Each contributing author introduces readers to performance topics, performing artists, and performative enactments that comprise the field of Borderlands Performance Studies. This field is identifiable through its commitment to an alter-Native cultural engineering, the technologies of which we editors identify as “de-colonizing performatics,” and the mestizaje, the hybridity, the bricolage, the rasquache interventions organized around de-colonization that we call “perform-antics.” Join us then as we set the academic stage where complex scholarly engagements are linked with the entertaining, enlightening, and emancipatory aesthetics of Borderlands Performance Studies.2

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Medium 9781574413205

Jess's First Coon Hunt

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch02.pdf

10/6/11

8:15 AM

Page 155

JESS’S FIRST COON HUNT by Lee Haile

When I was in high school in Hondo, Texas, I hunted for varmints all winter long. Furs were bringing good prices, and I could make some good spending money from selling them. Even though I was after anything with fur that I could sell, we always just called it

“coon hunting.” There were three ways that we hunted back then.

First, and my favorite, was walking the creeks at night with my dogs and letting them tree the varmints. My dogs were not noisy hounds, but rather quiet Border Collies that would only bark if they had something treed, and even then, they did not bark a lot. I trained them to be quiet so as not to scare off the rest of the critters along the creek. Also, I didn’t always have permission to hunt on all the places along the creeks where I walked. Back then, nobody really cared about me hunting for coons along the creeks.

That changed a few years later when fur prices got really high. I did this type of hunting by myself, and when I was most serious about the hunt.

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Medium 9780253010285

15 Devil in Blue Jeans

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Jim Roos was pleased to see a remarkable difference in the atmosphere in Ireland High School the following Monday morning. The pall of gloom that had hung over the building since the beginning of fall classes was gone, and in its place was a mood of sunny optimism, focus, and anticipation. Everything seemed brighter now in the light of the two season-opening wins. Students were more attentive and respectful of their teachers, the buzz in the hallways between classes was louder and more energized, and even janitor John Radke took greater pride in his work. And the generalized optimism was only enhanced by the Spuds’ third game, a road contest against nonconference opponent English, which offered no special difficulty and required no special strategy or stunts to motivate the players. The team cruised to an easy twenty-point win, 65–45, and now stood 3–0, although they faced next a challenging match with the Monroe City Blue Jeans, a home game on Tuesday before Thanksgiving.

Rapidly Pete Gill was becoming the talk of the town. In these early weeks of the season, he began to make a habit after practice of stopping for coffee and friendly chatter at Ame Leinenbach’s cafe. Although, on occasion, Pete had privately sampled some of Morris Weidenbenner’s home brew or would sneak a beer at Wop Fritsch’s tavern in Jasper, he had so far carefully avoided public consumption of alcoholic beverages in Ireland. Roy Allen, on the other hand, while only a moderate drinker, never tried to hide his consumption of alcohol, and in fact he frequently tended bar for Ame as summer employment, which had caused Roy some difficulty when Tommy Schitter was township trustee.

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Medium 9780253010285

27 Small Potatoes

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Early Friday morning Pete Gill and Roy Allen gathered the team in front of the school for the drive to Evansville. Ron Heim, who had served the team quietly, faithfully, and efficiently all year as student equipment manager, would follow in a third car with basketballs, uniforms, and other peripherals the team would need. Practice was scheduled at 10:30 AM on the Roberts Stadium floor. Following practice, they would repair to the Esquire Motel on the northern edge of the city to hole up till game time on Saturday.

Jim Roos was there as well to see them off with words of encouragement, wishing very much to be going along. It was his task, however, to stay behind and lead students and faculty through a day of regular classes when no one wanted to think of anything other than basketball. The morning mail brought to the school a bagload of letters from well-wishers around the state, including one postmarked Milan, Indiana. Jim opened it first. The brief message inside read, “To the Ireland Spuds. We did it back in 1954 and you can do it in 1963. Everybody in Milan is rooting for your team.” It was signed Cale Hudson, Milan Principal.

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Medium 9780253010285

7 Too Much Is Not Enough

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

As the August twilight faded over the roof of the whitewashed barn, Maurice Keusch dribbled with his back to the homemade basket, nailed to the barn boards. His brother Dennis, nicknamed Red, guarded him closely, blanketing his every movement with the special ferocity they reserved for these intense personal games of one-on-one. In an effort to break free, Maurice faked sharply to his right, then spun left to go up for a quick jumper, but Red, the skilled defenseman, recovered quickly and leaped up with his left arm extended, forcing the shot to go much higher than Maurice intended. Red then pivoted and planted his right foot firmly atop Maurice’s and successfully pinned him to the bare hard clay that served as their basketball court. When the ball hit the front of the rim and sprung harmlessly away, Red was in ready position for the defensive rebound.

“Hey! Watch the foot!” Maurice cried, looking around for an imaginary official. “He fouled me, ref!”

“Ref didn’t see it!” Red grinned as he dribbled out to the fifteen-foot range to begin his own offensive possession.

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Medium 9781626567719

6 Reframing from Doubt to Confidence

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

A lot of really good players I’ve been around believe they’re a lot better than they really are. They’re not constantly evaluating themselves critically. In a game like baseball, that every-day evaluation can be so detrimental. They’re smart enough to forget the negatives of the past and somehow only draw from the positive. As a result, these guys end up being better than their physical talent says they should be.1

—BILLY BEANE, executive vice president of baseball operations, Oakland A’s

Our reflexive thoughts and assumptions under pressure often lead us to feelings of fear, worry, and doubt. These reflexive thoughts and assumptions include, but aren’t limited to these:

We base our confidence on our most recent performance.

We assume we have to feel great to perform great.

We assume we are stuck in the present, pressure situation.

We fail to recognize our strengths and focus on our doubts.

The elite performers I interviewed boosted their confidence in unconventional ways. In this chapter, you’ll learn the methods these elite performers use to overcome their doubts and increase their confidence.

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