219 Chapters
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Medium 9781574414615

Recalcitrant Horses

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Recalcitrant Horses

This is a big part of every horseshoer’s life. A whole book could be written on this subject. When shoers get together, the main topic of conversation, after the usual bragging about their famous horse customers, quickly gets to recalcitrant horses. We talk about our worst cases, about worst cases we’ve heard about, and we listen carefully to each other’s stories because some day we may have to shoe those same horses.

The attitudes of shoers are as diverse as are the stories. Some shoers relish working with these difficult horses, even specializing in them. I’ve never understood this completely. I think it must be an adrenaline addiction. I know it’s a real high to put the last, completed foot on the ground and step back from a crazy horse, but I’m sure as hell not going to seek out that kind of high. I can get my adrenaline highs from driving in freeway traffic or raising kids or suggesting to my wife that she seems to be putting on weight. I don’t need extra adrenaline.

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Medium 9781574413205

The Decline of the Poacher as Fold Hero in Texas

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch01.pdf

10/6/11

8:14 AM

Page 29

THE DECLINE OF THE POACHER

AS FOLK HERO IN TEXAS by Riley Froh

Either poaching develops good hunters or else great hunters make good poachers, but the two fit together exceptionally well. However, one cannot be both a poacher and a sportsman. Certainly, trespassing on private property to take game and fish is best done by the slob hunter, someone who thinks only in terms of himself, neither caring for the future of wildlife nor the condition of his country, a selfish person of limited vision for the greater good of his surroundings. But the poacher is a legitimate folk character, larger than life and invoking all kinds of images in Texas—some, unfortunately, favorable.

The most seductive image of the Texas poacher is the subconscious connection in the public eye with the legendary and romantic archer Robin Hood, who slew the King’s deer with deadly accuracy and robbed the rich to provide for the poor. This thief is acceptable in history only because of his time, and he hardly transfers to today’s market. Toleration of such habits in the twenty-first century is out of place. In the framework of Merry Old England, catching game illegally represented a steed of a different hue. It all started when Robin dropped a fine buck out of need, dispatched a

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Medium 9780253002952

20 “Pelones y Matones”: Chicano Cholos Perform for a Punitive Audience

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

VICTOR M. RIOS & PATRICK LOPEZ-AGUADO

Riviera is a small city on the California coast well known as a tourist destination and idyllic beachside community.1 Its beautiful coastal geography inflates real estate values, attracting the development of hidden mansions along hillsides that offer scenic ocean views as well as upscale boutiques along Beach Street, the main corridor of its downtown commercial district. Home to numerous theaters, museums, and celebrity vacation homes, the city sells itself as having the culture and sophistication of elite Los Angeles without the big-city problems of crime or poverty. It is a city that, through the prioritizing and policing of public space, works to maintain the popular perception that it is exclusively wealthy and White.

However, despite its tranquil image, it is not a city immune from race and class conflicts. A few blocks from Beach Street, Chavez Street cuts through East Riviera as a kind of second main street, one that caters to the city’s overlooked Chicano/a population.2 The Chicano/a community constitutes approximately 30 percent of the city’s population, and most of these residents work in the low-wage service sector of the local economy. This is a community largely hidden from the projected image of this city, and its residents are rarely acknowledged as belonging in Riviera. People of color here are seen as the servants to the served of the city. The east side of Riviera houses many residents of color who struggle to get by in the face of an extravagant cost of living, one of the highest in the nation. Cristina, a thirty-one-year-old mother of a fourteen-year-old girl, explains:

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Medium 9780253014993

4. The Social and Gender in Fantasy Sports Leagues

Thomas P Oates Indiana University Press ePub

Luke Howie and Perri Campbell

Since the mid-1990s, fantasy sports participation has grown at a significant rate. According to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, just under thirty-two million people over twelve years old play fantasy sports in North America (including Canada). In the United Kingdom, two million people participate in fantasy Premier League soccer games.1 The financial impact of fantasy sports is measured in billions of euros and dollars.2 Most people cite early 1980s rotisserie baseball leagues as the precursors to the contemporary online fantasy sports experience, but there is some evidence that rudimentary forms of fantasy sports have existed since the mid-1950s.3

In this chapter we provide an account of ongoing research being conducted with the members of a long-running fantasy NBA league based in Australia and their wives and partners. The league began in the late 1990s as a hobby for ten friends who had attended high school or college together, and all played competitive basketball, some to professional and semiprofessional levels. It is played online but features many offline supplementary activities, including a live offline draft party, elaborate mechanisms for choosing the draft order (referred to by participants as the “lottery”), and detailed, ongoing discussions about strategies, statistics, and trades taking place year-round. There are benefits to understanding fantasy sports as a site for advertising and marketing, as gambling, and as a problematic regulatory field.4 We are studying fantasy sports leagues as a social occurrence that takes place in online and offline realms where gender matters and takes various hegemonic forms.

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Medium 9780253002952

12 Sonic Geographies and Anti-Border Musics: “We Didn’t Cross the Border, the Borders Crossed Us”

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

ROBERTO D. HERNÁNDEZ

What must be done is to restore this dream to its proper time . . . and to its proper place . . .

FRANTZ FANON (1967)

Strong whirling sounds grow louder and louder. The surrounding brush sways violently and is nearly uprooted. A helicopter hovering overhead nears, and you hear the desperate words, “Levántate compadre / ¿Que pasa? / ¿Oyes ese zumbido? / Si, compadre . . . es el helicóptero . . . / Métete debajo de esos matorrales . . . de volada, apúrate. / Híjole, se me hace que ya me agarraron / Eso es lo de menos compadre, se me hace que ya nos llevo, la que nos trajo compadre.”

(Get up compadre / What’s happening? / Do you hear that noise? / Yes, compadre . . . it’s the helicopter . . . / Get under those bushes . . . quickly, hurry up. / Oh shit, I think they got me . . . / that is the least of it, compadre . . . I think the one that’s taking us . . . is the one that brought us here, compadre.)1

The above exchange opens Tijuana NO’s 1998 hit song “La Migra,” whose land and soundscape bears an eerie resemblance to the terrain near my childhood home, where corrugated steel extends into the Pacific Ocean, creating a rhythmic rumbling sound as wave after wave crashes up against the U-S///México border2 wall in the area once known as Friendship Park.3

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana VS. Notre Dame, 12-17-11 (69-58)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers guard Victor Oladipo (4) drives the ball on Notre Dame Fighting Irish guard Jerian Grant (22) during the Indiana Notre Dame men’s basketball game at Conseco Fieldhouse in game two of the Close the Gap Crossroads Classic in Indianapolis, Ind., Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011.

By Dustin Dopirak

Tom Crean doesn’t know what Derek Elston was thinking, and it’s hard to imagine anyone else could come up with a logical explanation either.

With the Hoosiers in a mad dash to get the ball down the floor for one more shot at the end of the first half of Saturday’s game against Notre Dame, Elston pulled up from about half-court for a desperation heave. That would’ve been fine if there weren’t 4.5 seconds still left on the clock.

But on a play that was strangely indicative of Indiana’s entire day, freshman guard Remy Abell bolted under the bucket and put back Elston’s wild miss at the buzzer to give Indiana a 26-20 lead at the half.

“Maybe he saw what Christian (Watford) saw last week with 0.8,” Crean said, referring to Watford’s buzzer-beater that knocked off No. 1 Kentucky. “I don’t know. It looked more to me like it said 4.5 or somewhere in there, and he didn’t see that. But the presence of mind of Remy was just fantastic.”

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana VS. Purdue, 3-4-12 (85-74)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers guard Verdell Jones III (12) drives the baseline against Purdue Boilermakers guard Ryne Smith (24) during the Indiana Purdue men’s basketball game at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind., Sunday, March 4, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

The last game in Assembly Hall in Indiana’s enchanted season of renewal couldn’t have ended any other way, could it? It certainly would’ve spoiled the narrative some if the Hoosiers would’ve suffered their second loss in Bloomington this year and for it to happen against their in-state rival. And it certainly wouldn’t have been quite as sweet for Indiana if the Hoosiers weren’t able to send in together in the game’s final minute their five seniors, the ones who willingly signed up to rebuild a kingdom in ruin and finally got to see it rise again in their final season.

But the Hoosiers’ 85-74 win over Purdue in front of 17,472 at Assembly Hall made sure this chapter of the story book ended the way the fairy tale writers would have it. Despite a second-half charge from the Boilermakers that was just enough to make the Hoosiers nervous, the double-digit lead in the final minute allowed Indiana to check in seniors Kory Barnett, Verdell Jones III, Daniel Moore, Tom Pritchard and Matt Roth with 22 seconds to go, as they exchanged hugs with each other and all five players who were coming off the floor to allow them their Assembly Hall swan song.

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Medium 9781574414615

Chickens

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Chickens

At one point in my life I decided that nailing metal shoes on large animals wasn’t exciting enough, so I became a gentleman farmer. It wasn’t much of a farm, just a corner lot in a suburban tract in Northern California, but to me it was everything. I started with chickens. A real farm has chickens. Wearing my brand-new leather farmer’s gloves, I built a chicken coop out of old scrap lumber and chicken wire. It was magnificent—just like the how-to-build-a-chicken-coop book said. It even had little rooms (the book called them nests) where the chickens could lay their eggs, and where I could sneakily open a back door and snatch the eggs out from under the hens.

I threw handfuls of sawdust all over the bottom of their cage for them to walk on, and went out to get some chickens.

I bought some White Leghorns because the guy at the feed store told me that they were the ones that laid the eggs. I may rarely believe anything a horse owner tells me, but I always believe everything the guy at the feed store tells me. I put them all in the pen. It wasn’t very exciting. They just looked at each other. Over the next few days, except for when my neighbor would throw garbage over the fence for them, their lives were pretty much hum-drum. I knew that cows who listened to music gave more milk, but I wasn’t sure if entertainment would increase egg production. I felt like I should do something for them, so I introduced a different colored hen into the group. She was a Rhode Island Red, actually what is called a sex-link, but I don’t think I can explain that. My children, who thought Dad had gone over the edge, but were rather entertained by it all, to my embarrassment named this newcomer Henny Cluck.

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Medium 9781574413205

Texas Menu 1835: Venison and Honey, Prairie Chicken, or Baked Fish

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch05.pdf

10/6/11

8:17 AM

Page 319

TEXAS MENU 1835: VENISON AND HONEY,

PRAIRIE CHICKEN, OR BAKED FISH by Jerry Bryan Lincecum

The autobiography of Gideon Lincecum, my great-great-great grandfather, contains some remarkable accounts of hunting and fishing in unspoiled areas of Texas in 1835. Lincecum’s six-month exploration of Texas came about after a good many citizens of

Columbus, Mississippi, where he resided and practiced medicine, became interested in migrating to Texas. An emigrating company was organized late in 1834, and Lincecum was appointed physician to an exploring committee charged with traveling to Texas and bringing back a report. He and five other men left Columbus on

January 9, 1835, and crossed the Sabine River into Texas on February 3.1 The following excerpts from Lincecum’s autobiography are among many that describe encounters with wildlife in Texas. In

1848, Lincecum moved his family to Long Point, Washington

County. His memoirs were written when he was an old man, and most of his accounts of hunting and fishing were first published in

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Medium 9781574413205

Pranks in Hungting Camp; Or, the Physiological and Psychological Benefits of Ancient Rites Practiced in Bucolic and Fraternal Settings

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch05.pdf

10/6/11

8:17 AM

Page 297

PRANKS IN HUNTING CAMP; OR, THE

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL

BENEFITS OF ANCIENT RITES PRACTICED

IN BUCOLIC AND FRATERNAL SETTINGS by Robert Flynn

For reasons yet to be explained, God and the Supreme Court placed hunting season during the shortest days of the year. For those who venture into nature to collect something edible rather than to escape TV, that means a lot of non-hunting time in hunting camp. Some hunters fill those hours with eating, drinking, arguing hunting strategies, conjuring visions of the next hunt, playing cards, eating, cooking, tinkering with mechanical devices such as hunting vehicles, cleaning hunting gear (including selected game), cleaning the cabin, and/or cleaning oneself.

While those are meaningful, productive and necessary, the serious hunter also requires creative activities. The two fundamental exercises of the imagination are: One, the preparation, polishing, and delivery of the day’s hunting story that includes in detail every animal seen, and the description of the width, breadth, length and points of the bucks’ horns with poetic license; and also the enumeration of the number of turkeys, feral hogs, and other game with manly exaggeration. Two, the preparation of the

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Medium 9781574416527

Chapter 12 - Huntsville Prison Blues (1970–1979)

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

“You must not be afraid to fight for the rodeo when the occasion arises.”

—Dave Price, Rodeo Supervisor, 1970

PRIOR to the 1960s, the American court system allowed prison wardens and related authorities to operate virtually unimpeded by outside interference and oversight. However, a handful of U.S. Supreme Court decisions began to turn the tide towards safeguarding prisoners’ rights. In the wake of these rulings an avalanche of litigation would transform prison conditions in the 1970s. One of the most important decisions was Cooper v. Pate in 1964, which allowed inmates to sue state officials in federal court, setting into motion a series of prisoner lawsuits protesting the often brutal conditions of the nation's prisons and leading to the unprecedented “liberalization” of prisons.”1

The social forces of 1960s radicalization touched most segments of American society, including the convict cowboys of the Texas Prison Rodeo, although many of them might not have noticed straight away. Beginning in this decade of social change, prison reform advocates aggressively used courts to extend the rights of prisoners and improve their lives behind bars as inmates familiarized themselves with their constitutional rights. Among the most valuable tools of the so-called “prison lawyers” were the writ of habeas corpus and the Civil Rights Act.2 The writ-writing inmates of the Texas prison system would use the power of the writ to challenge the status quo of their confinement, utilizing litigation as an alternative to violence.

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Medium 9781574414615

A Wyoming Cowboy

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

A Wyoming Cowboy

Recalcitrant horses can be tricked, outsmarted, manhandled, pushed, and shoved, but there is another way: listening to them.

All horseshoers talk to horses, but few horseshoers listen to what the horses have to say in return. One of those who listens is a tough old cowboy named Larry Swingle. At the time I knew him, he had spent twenty years as a horseshoer, during which time he began to study horse musculature and everything else he could find out about horses. He was friends with the right people so he had access to the bodies of dead horses, which he cut open and studied as closely as a first-year medical student working on a cadaver. He learned just about all there was to know about horse anatomy . . . more than the average veterinarian learned in school. During this process, he discovered that he could also communicate with horses. He could understand them. Eventually, he possessed the extraordinary ability to recognize a horse’s physical abnormalities, and the equally extraordinary ability to communicate directly with the horse. Over a period of one year, I was a personal witness to these abilities.

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Photos Section

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

On the fence.

Marine Corps Mountain School. 1958. I’m on lower right.

Fresh from active duty in the Corps.

In Tacoma after active duty and before entering Seminary. 1960.

Graduating from Seminary. 1963.

Official picture of smiling Marine Corps major in Reserves. 1967.

Dad, Mom, me, and Nicky, my faithful horseshoeing dog.

Nicky, eagerly waiting in back of my truck.

Working in the sun in California. 1975.

Typical customer’s view of a horseshoer.

Feeding hoof parings to wild turkeys. 1990.

Dog and turkeys eating hoof parings fresh off of horse, who couldn’t care less.

Lady apprentice watching me measure a shoe. 1978.

Rasping a foot. 2011.

Picture by David Beardsley.

Nipping for a field trim. 2011.

Picture by David Beardsley.

Cochise, my favorite customer. 2011.

Picture by David Beardsley.

Thinking about it all. 2011.

Picture by David Beardsley.

Rasping a left hind foot. 2011.

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Medium 9780253002952

21 Mexica Hip Hop: Male Expressive Culture

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

PANCHO MCFARLAND

On Los Nativos’ album Día de los Muertos (2003), the well-orchestrated, multi-layered musical production of Chilam Balam (Speaker for the Jaguar People) is somehow both funky and indigenous. The opening track, “Ometeoht,” is a “Mexica prayer.” The prayer opens with blowing conch shells, shaken beads, and Mesoamerican drums. Los Nativos chant in Spanish. The second track, “Like the Indigenous,” begins with a deep bass drum pounding out a standard syncopated hip-hop beat and a jazz-inspired, synthesized high hat. The emcees, Balam and Cuauhtli (The Eagle), trade verses in which they rap about the many things they do that are “like the indigenous.” Throughout the album, Balam uses drum machines, beads, shells, pianos, synthesizers, live drums, and other instruments to create polyrhythmic beats and a musical background that signals the myriad cultural, political, and economic factors contributing to Los Nativos’ lyrical and artistic neo-indigenism. Los Nativos’ lyrics and flow (cadence and meter) speak to their neo-indigenist ways (identity, traditions, customs, language, values, and cosmology) and militant resistance to colonialism and European domination. At the same time, their aesthetics and politics are indebted to a patriarchal, male-centered lineage in Chicano culture. These men of Mexican descent critique white colonialism and domination but retain their male privilege. Neo-indigenist privileging of the patriarchal imperial civilization of the Aztec/Mexica over the numerous cultures and nations in the pre-Columbian Américas that were matrilineal and matriarchal means that men dominate the social, political, and economic structures of an envisioned neo-Mexica/indigenism.

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Medium 9780253010285

10 Your Blood, Your Sweat, Your Tears

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

As the summer of ’62 neared its end and Pete Gill found himself greeted ever more commonly with rank skepticism among Ireland townfolk, a natural tendency toward paranoia began gnawing at his mental health. Jim Roos was doing all he could to plant the seeds of optimism around the village, but there remained intense pockets of resistance. As Pete well knew, the most intense such pocket was located inside Tommy Schitter’s grocery and butcher shop only a few blocks from the high school. The fact that Tommy’s son Pat was regarded by many, including Jim Roos, as one of the best basketball prospects among an inexperienced but promising sophomore class only added to Pete’s mental disturbance. Irrationally, he concluded that the best solution would be to see to it that Pat did not make the team. Roy Allen, with whom Pete had otherwise quickly achieved a harmonious rapport, did not agree.

“You’ll be cutting off your nose to spite your face, Pete,” Roy said the day before fall classes were to begin. They were huddled together behind the locked door of the coach’s office in the gymnasium, amidst a cloud of cigarette smoke.

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