219 Chapters
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Medium 9781574414615

Weather

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Weather

Shoeing horses is not a pleasant way to make a living, but when the weather is extreme, it is downright miserable. The extremes are heat, cold, and rain. It’s best to stay home when these conditions are severe, but when you have no food in the house, you have to do what you have to do.

Heat, without question, is the most troublesome for me. I’ll choose rain over heat, any day. In fact I will no longer shoe a horse on an extremely hot day unless there is a cool barn or some kind of shelter. I’m from the Northwest and we don’t quite know what to do on hot days. We don’t get a lot of them, so when it gets to be in the high eighties or nineties, everyone just stands around in confusion and complains. Air conditioners have arrived in most business offices and fastfood restaurants, but are seldom found in anyone’s home. I only recently got a truck with an air conditioner.

One hot day in California during my first year of shoeing when I usually took two hours to shoe a horse under normal conditions, I took almost five hours to shoe one horse. I drank a lot of water, but the heat got to me. I’d work for awhile, get dizzy, and go into the hay room and lie down on a bale of hay until the dizziness went away. I turned a hose on my head and upper body every now and then, but that didn’t stop the dizziness. That horse stood out there the whole time in the blazing sun, mostly asleep, and didn’t seem bothered at all by the heat. I probably suffered from heat stroke and didn’t have the sense to recognize it. No one was around to point it out to me.

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Medium 9781626567719

7 Reframing from Failure to Learning Moment

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

Baseball teaches us how to deal with failure. We learn at a very young age that failure is the norm in baseball and, precisely because we have failed, we hold in high regard those who fail less often—those who hit safely in one out of three chances and become star players.

—FAY VINCENT, former Commissioner of Baseball

I met Garry Ridge, President and CEO of the WD-40 Company, about ten years ago after he spoke at The Ken Blanchard Companies’ client conference. During that conference, Garry shared the concept this chapter was named after—learning moments. Since that time, I’ve had the good fortune to speak with Garry on a few occasions. Most recently, Garry shared with me how he improves his own performance as well as the performance of the larger WD-40 Company “tribe” by reframing.

It started when I looked at WD-40 in the late 1990s. We were seeking to grow from $90 million to $400 million in revenue. I thought about what could keep us from hitting our growth targets. From my perspective, it boiled down to one thing—fear.

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Medium 9781574414615

What the Well-Dressed Horseshoer Wears

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

What the Well-Dressed Horseshoer Wears

Horseshoer’s clothes are not particularly distinguished, but there are some peculiarities. Steel-toed boots are usually a good idea for protecting the farrier’s foot from getting smashed, but there are always stories about some horseshoer or another getting his steel-toed boot stomped on by a heavy horse and having the steel plate trap his squashed toes in the boot. It would take a jaws-of-life (or jaws-of-foot) to get these squashed toes free from the boot. You would have to cut off the bottom of the boot to get them out. As gruesomely dangerous as this sounds, I’ve still always worn steel-toed boots. I haven’t had my foot stepped on much, but I suspect I would if I even thought about going out in tennis shoes. And horseshoers being what they are, there’s always someone who does wear tennis shoes. It’s so they can get away fast, they’ll say.

I never wear a ring while working with horses. I take off my wedding ring and put it somewhere safe in the truck, a long ways from the horse. I also put in the truck my wallet and everything else I don’t want lost in the dirt. My fear about my ring, more like a nightmare, is that a horse will step on my hand and squash the ring flat with my finger inside it. I don’t know anyone this has happened to, but it could happen.

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Medium 9781574414615

More Pig Stories

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

More Pig Stories

Some of my best horse customers lived up in the hills of Northern California where horses were a way of life. We lived there, too. The houses and ranches were spread out and most people had plenty of room for horses used for working cattle and sheep, for pleasure riding, and for shows, fairs, and rodeos. It was horse country. It was also wild pig country. Almost everybody in the county had some kind of wild pig story where the storyteller had been chased through the woods and into the house, where pig and person raced around the house until the person jumped on top of the refrigerator in a final effort to save their skin. About half of these storytellers could show you the scars from the pig attack. The stories and scars all seemed to be authentic.

My stories aren’t nearly as exciting. I seldom saw any wild pigs, but I saw signs of them. I raised a lot of rabbits that we either sold to pet shops or ate, and after slaughtering the ones for eating, I would throw the hides, guts, heads, and feet over a fence into the woods. By the following morning there would be no trace of any of this. The pigs came down and ate everything. Once I found a tail that had been overlooked, but everything else, skulls and all, had been eaten. I knew it was pigs and not vultures, because I could see the tracks. These pigs were also a nuisance to the sheep ranchers because the pigs became so bold as to start eating a birthing lamb before it had even fully emerged.

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Medium 9781574413205

The Pointer

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574411607

Detail maps

Geraldine Ellis Watson University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9780253002952

17 Is Ugly Betty a Real Woman? Representations of Chicana Femininity Inscribed as a Site of (Transformative) Difference Jennifer Esposito

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

JENNIFER ESPOSITO

Popular culture texts inform us about our social world. They teach us about ourselves and also about “Others.” We learn who is valued in the larger society as well as who is marginalized. Although popular culture reflects our society, as an institution it also helps construct ideologies that we live out and perform in our daily lives. People may turn to texts for information on what it means to be a particular race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and/or sexual orientation. Visual images thus become textual lessons that become inscribed on lived bodies and incorporated into ideological structures of society. For bodies already marginalized in the larger society, the power of representations becomes much more pronounced. In fact, a “burden of representation” exists whenever a marginalized group is represented in popular culture.1 This is especially true for the Latina body, as Mary Beltrán argues: “media representations of the Latina body thus form a symbolic battleground upon which the ambivalent place of Latinos and Latinas in US society is acted out.”2

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Medium 9781574414615

A Wyoming Cowboy

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

A Wyoming Cowboy

Recalcitrant horses can be tricked, outsmarted, manhandled, pushed, and shoved, but there is another way: listening to them.

All horseshoers talk to horses, but few horseshoers listen to what the horses have to say in return. One of those who listens is a tough old cowboy named Larry Swingle. At the time I knew him, he had spent twenty years as a horseshoer, during which time he began to study horse musculature and everything else he could find out about horses. He was friends with the right people so he had access to the bodies of dead horses, which he cut open and studied as closely as a first-year medical student working on a cadaver. He learned just about all there was to know about horse anatomy . . . more than the average veterinarian learned in school. During this process, he discovered that he could also communicate with horses. He could understand them. Eventually, he possessed the extraordinary ability to recognize a horse’s physical abnormalities, and the equally extraordinary ability to communicate directly with the horse. Over a period of one year, I was a personal witness to these abilities.

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Medium 9781574413205

Deliverance II: The Tale of a Strange Encounter in the Big Thicket

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch05.pdf

10/6/11

8:17 AM

Page 289

DELIVERANCE II: THE TALE OF A STRANGE

ENCOUNTER IN THE BIG THICKET by Robert J. (Jack) Duncan

When I met Jim twenty some-odd years ago, he was vice-president of an insurance company. That evening I had dinner with him and another fellow. Over drinks before dinner, he got to telling us about a strange encounter he had experienced in the Big Thicket that was reminiscent of the James Dickey book—and the Burt

Reynolds film—Deliverance.

The encounter had occurred several years earlier. At the time

Jim had lived in Dallas. He wanted to get away from the stress of his job for a few days, to get off by himself in the woods and hunt deer. During deer season, Jim drove to a small town in the Thicket.

It was a cold night. He stopped at a hamburger joint to ask directions. The cook insisted that Jim buy at least a burger or two before he would tell him anything.

As Jim was eating, the cook introduced him to another customer, Frank, who was a local hunter. Frank said that he was camped out with some of his kinfolks and invited Jim to join them.

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Medium 9781626567719

5 Reframing from Anxiety to Taking Control

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

You are a professional glove hitter. Hit the glove!

—RICK PETERSON

There are many things about pressure situations which cause our anxiety levels to rise. The reasons include, but aren’t limited to, these:

We focus on goals or factors outside of our control.

We focus on outcomes rather than the process to achieve those outcomes.

We get overwhelmed by the perceived difficulty of the task.

We commit to doing too much.

Our expectations are too high because we use the wrong measuring stick.

We exaggerate the importance of the situation.

In this chapter, we share a number of antidotes to pressure that will lower your anxiety levels and put you back in control.

At the beginning of spring training every year, Rick asks his pitchers, “What’s your goal?” Most of the answers given center around outcomes like winning a certain number of games, or pitching a certain number of innings. Rick takes these answers as an opportunity to teach a lesson in goal setting. While many of us have been taught to set lofty, long-term-outcome goals, the type that show up on the back of a baseball card or a company financial statement, these goals are overrated in comparison to lesser-appreciated, short-term, bite-sized process goals.

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Deer Leaves

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch02.pdf

10/6/11

8:15 AM

Page 99

DEER LEAVES by Bob Dunn

I’m not sure of the first time I went to the deer lease; probably it was in 1970, when I turned nine years old. It seemed that it was just always there. Early on, I called it “deer leaves” because that’s what I thought the grown-ups were saying.

I remember waking up one morning after Dad’s return from the hunt to find a deer hanging from a tree in the front yard of our home in Garland. Back then, the neighborhood butcher shop would process the kill for us, but later medical concerns over crosscontamination of retail meat market equipment led to a law prohibiting the practice. After that, we did our own butchering, and we always had backstraps to chicken-fry and plenty of meat to barbecue, though we never mastered sausage making.

Besides being a great place to hunt, the lease was an easy, twohour drive from home. Dad worked nights, so we could leave after school on Friday and still have some daylight left when we got there. In those days, I thought more about landmarks along the highway than of time and distance. Shortly after leaving Garland we would pass Big Town, where we’d sometimes see Santa arrive by helicopter for a pre-Christmas visit. Then we’d drive into downtown Dallas, which would disappear as the roadway dipped into the “canyon” and the only tunnel I knew existed.

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Medium 9781574414615

The First Horse

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

The First Horse

I put a shoe on my first horse at horseshoeing school. We students were all excited to finally get out of the classroom and put our hands on a live horse. We were working in pairs, each person required to put on one front and one hind shoe. The horses came from local skinflints who were willing to sacrifice the feet of their horses to inexperienced horseshoeing students in order to save the cost of a shoeing. The school charged nothing for this service, and, as I recall, that was the right price for our work.

Nervous students were working on the horses who had arrived, but my partner and I still waited for ours. We wandered around criticizing everyone’s work, occasionally joined others in trying to make the first cut on the mid-summer, stone-hard feet of these first clients. It was hot and discouraging. I wondered what had possessed me to get involved in this ridiculous way of life, and I hadn’t even started yet. Heat, fear, frustration, and a sense of hopelessness all mixed together.

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana VS. Kentucky, 12-10-11 (73-72)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Christian Watford (2) hits the game winning last second shot over Kentucky Wildcats guard Darius Miller (1) during the Indiana Kentucky men’s basketball game at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind., Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011. Indiana won 73-72.

By Dustin Dopirak

Within seconds of his picture-perfect, buzzer-beating 3-pointer’s contact with the net on Assembly Hall’s north goal, Christian Watford was prone on the floor and swimming in an ocean of human catharsis.

The Indiana student section didn’t so much storm the court after the Hoosiers stunned No. 1 Kentucky, 73-72, as swallow it whole. The mayhem built outward from the spot where Watford fell on the floor near the scorer’s table on the west sideline and kept getting bigger until fans covered every single wood panel on Branch McCracken Court at Assembly Hall from end to end.

Fans were singing along with the pep band and lifting each other on their shoulders and trying to find players and coaches to whom to express their gratitude. Watford and several of his teammates escaped from beneath the crush of humanity only to bathe in its glow, standing atop the scorer’s table and gesturing to the crowd as if directing some joyful orchestra.

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Part V

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574416527

Appendix II - Top Hand Winners

Mitchel P. Roth University of North Texas Press ePub

Top Hand Winners

The Top Hand award, the most prestigious of all TPR awards, was presented to the cowboy who earned the most total money by riding in or scoring highest in the major riding events, which included saddle bronc, bareback bronc, and bullriding. The Top Hand received an engraved gold and silver belt buckle acclaiming him Top Hand.

 

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