219 Chapters
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Medium 9781574413205

Our Family Fishing Trips

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch03.pdf

10/6/11

8:16 AM

Page 183

OUR FAMILY FISHING TRIPS by L. R. McCormack

One of my fondest memories of my Coney family is the fishing trips. Fishing was one of the activities the Coney boys loved. The

“boys” were the four sons of Leon Josephus Coney and Ida

Augusta Hawkins Coney. Their farm was located about five miles southeast of Ladonia, Texas. Not only was fishing their favorite sport, but it also provided some good meals. Their fishing was not done with a rod and reel. They used seines, and “grabbled” for the fish. My dad, Lowell (Sheep), and his brother Roy Leon (Buster) were the only two of the boys who could swim. Being the two youngest boys, they had developed a close bond through the years.

Dad could hold his breath under water so very long that they sometimes wondered if he had drowned. Buster could dive deeper than Dad. between the two of them, they checked out each fishing hole for suitable fish—as well as for water moccasins that were living in those holes—and selected the holes they would fish. They had several places that they visited regularly.

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Medium 9780253008589

Indiana VS. Ohio State, 12-31-11 (74-70)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Cody Zeller (40) shoots over Ohio State Buckeyes forward Jared Sullinger (0) during the Indiana Ohio State men’s basketball game at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind., Saturday, Dec. 31, 2011. Indiana won 74-70.

By Dustin Dopirak

This time there were no students — or at least not enough of a consolidated group of them among the sold-out New Year’s Eve Assembly Hall crowd — to storm the floor, so Indiana coach Tom Crean had most of it to himself.

He rushed to one side of the floor and gestured to the roaring crowd in the East stands by raising his arms up from under him like he was bowling with both hands. He then turned to the West stands and did the same.

The crowd had given him exactly what he’d asked for — an atmosphere that nearly matched the one that was in Assembly Hall on Dec. 10 when the Hoosiers upset then-No. 1 Kentucky, despite the fact that Saturday’s game came during the semester break. His team paid them back with a performance that was on that level and perhaps even more important to the journey for this revived Indiana program.

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Medium 9781574413205

Contributor's Vitas

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-vitas.pdf

10/6/11

8:18 AM

Page 345

CONTRIBUTORS’ VITAS

Francis Edward Abernethy is Professor Emeritus of English at

Stephen F. Austin State University and Editor Emeritus of the

Texas Folklore Society.

Len Ainsworth indulges his interest in things “Texas” via involvement in the National Ranching Heritage Center, the National Cowboy Symposium and Celebration, and by dealing in collectible books through his Adobe Book Collection (www.adobebookcollection

.com). He is a member of a local Westerners corral, TSHA, TFS, and is a frequent contributor to the RHA quarterly Ranch Record. He is

Emeritus Professor and Vice-Provost of Texas Tech University.

Randy Cameron is a native Texan and a retired journalism instructor. He is now a fly fishing guide in Colorado, where he lives on the Rio Grande River in the San Juan Mountains with his wife Mary and son Will.

Mary Margaret Dougherty Campbell, a sixth-generation Texan, holds a B.A. and an M.A. in English from Texas Tech University, and also an M.S. in Educational Administration from Texas A & M University, Corpus Christi. She has presented papers at the South Central

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Medium 9781574413205

Fishing

Edited by Kenneth L. Untiedt University of North Texas Press PDF

7978-ch05.pdf

10/6/11

8:17 AM

Page 331

FISHING by Vicky J. Rose

When the call came from the Texas Folklore Society for papers about hunting and fishing lore, I immediately dismissed it. I never hunted and haven’t fished in years. Yet, the more I thought about it, the more I realized what an important hand fishing took in developing my attitude toward life and people.

In those pre-feminist days during the late fifties and early sixties, women with children rarely worked outside the home. I was the middle child of three girls, tow-headed, with wide and trusting eyes. To keep from driving our mother crazy, she kept us busy playing with dolls in the winter, carving doll houses out of cardboard boxes and decorating them with scraps of wallpaper and fabric. In the summer, we were expected to play outdoors. Our only enemies then were snakes and the sticker-burs that infested the deep sandy soil where we lived. My older sister, with her delicate hands and tiny wrists, had an almost abnormal fear of spiders.

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Medium 9780253002952

1 Body as Codex-ized Word / Cuerpo Como Palabra (en-)Códice-ado: Chicana/Indígena and Mexican Transnational Performative Indigeneities Micaela Díaz-Sánchez

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

MICAELA DÍAZ-SÁNCHEZ

In the performance work of Mexican actress, writer, and director Jesusa Rodríguez and Chicana/Tepehuana1 painter / installation artist / performance artist Celia Herrera-Rodríguez, the body functions as the critical site for the (de)construction of national and Indigenous identities. The corporeal operates as the primary signifier in the reclamation of denied histories. Through the self-consciously performative style of cabaret and espectáculo (spectacle), Jesusa Rodríguez monumentalizes México’s Indigenous histories as she employs discourse central to Mexican national identity and cultural citizenship. Celia Herrera-Rodríguez enacts Indigeneity as intimate ritual and positions her work as personal historical recovery and pedagogy aimed at creating dialogue among Indigenous communities on a global level. Their aesthetic methodologies are mediated by multifarious contradictions, colonial epistemologies, and discursive strategies for survival. In the critical recognition and negotiation of these refractory mediations, performance functions as an embodied attempt at reclamation of Indigenous narratives, in and out of the “nation.”

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Medium 9780253010285

17 I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Someone had put coal in the Spuds’ Christmas stockings. Mercifully Pete did not force the team to practice on Christmas Day, but he held practice on Christmas Eve and on the day after Christmas and on every other day over Christmas break. The practices were every bit as merciless as they had been in the preseason, if not more so. Pete, however, backed off from any special focus on Joe Lents, who nevertheless retreated into a quiet funk, while the rest of the team waited for him to return his head to winning basketball. It would take a while.

Joe was not about to get over the incident quickly. In January and February, his scoring markedly declined from the sixteen points he was averaging per game prior to the tourney. Most games he barely reached double figures. Before the holidays, Joe was fourth in the conference in scoring. By the end of the regular season, he had dropped to ninth. This was not the way he had wanted his senior season to go, but he just could not get himself motivated to play his best for Pete Gill.

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21 Walk Like a Man

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

Pete Gill was more on edge about Winslow than he let on to anyone, except perhaps Roy Allen. He and Roy had scouted the Eskimos in a loss against Huntingburg, 61–54, one of only two victories for the Hunters all year. But Winslow was a young team, with no seniors and a squad made up almost entirely of volatile juniors, featuring good speed and streaky shooting skills. If the shots started to fall, they gained confidence with each basket. In Pete’s nightmares, the Eskimos would get hot, the Spuds would go cold, and his dream season would be shot dead in a humiliating flash the very first game of the tournament.

Adding to his worries, on Thursday the Spuds received unexpected and unwelcome word that Allen Voelkel would be unavailable for the Sectional. For several days he had been complaining of severe back pain and fatigue. Perplexed and frustrated, he and his father went first to a chiropractor, who told them the problem was not Allen’s back. Then a Jasper MD examined him and found albumen in his urine. Not a good sign.

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Medium 9781574414615

Crime in a Small Town

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

Crime in a Small Town

I live in the rural Northwest, where, contrary to popular belief, a small town can have problems with crime. I’m going to tell about some of them.

Before I get into the actual crimes we have to deal with here, I need to mention one curious thing. We don’t seem to have many problems with kids or teenagers. It’s an odd experience to walk up to a 17-year-old kid whose hair is sticking straight up in multi-colored spikes, his body covered with tattoos, his head filled with metal piercings, and ask him how to get to the nearest Starbucks, and he responds pleasantly and eagerly, even calling you “sir.” This usually happens. And the kid isn’t playing you for a fool; it’s the way the kids act around here. I never got that kind of response in California. Another thing that may have something to do with kids is that there never seems to be any graffiti anywhere, even on bathroom walls in gas stations. This is pretty much true throughout the area. The biggest graffiti I’ve seen is on the walls of a tunnel where the culprits use a wet towel to write their messages in the grime on the tunnel walls. The messages will say something like, “I love you Sarah,” “Support the Queen of the Netherlands,” or “US out of Oregon.” The messages last only a few days, however, because the cleanup crews wash down the walls frequently.

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Medium 9781574414615

The First Horse

Ron Tatum University of North Texas Press ePub

The First Horse

I put a shoe on my first horse at horseshoeing school. We students were all excited to finally get out of the classroom and put our hands on a live horse. We were working in pairs, each person required to put on one front and one hind shoe. The horses came from local skinflints who were willing to sacrifice the feet of their horses to inexperienced horseshoeing students in order to save the cost of a shoeing. The school charged nothing for this service, and, as I recall, that was the right price for our work.

Nervous students were working on the horses who had arrived, but my partner and I still waited for ours. We wandered around criticizing everyone’s work, occasionally joined others in trying to make the first cut on the mid-summer, stone-hard feet of these first clients. It was hot and discouraging. I wondered what had possessed me to get involved in this ridiculous way of life, and I hadn’t even started yet. Heat, fear, frustration, and a sense of hopelessness all mixed together.

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Medium 9781626567719

1 Reframing—The Shortest Path from Threat to Opportunity

Peterson, Rick; Hoekstra, Judd Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.

—MILTON BERLE

At its core, reframing describes the skill of consciously and intentionally thinking about a situation in a new or different way. This, in turn, allows us to shift the meaning we attach to the situation, the actions we take, and the results we achieve. The operative word in our definition is skill. In other words, it’s not something some are gifted with and others are not. With practice, reframing can be learned by anyone.

reframe [ri: ‘ freım]

The skill of consciously thinking about a situation in a new or different way to change how you interpret the situation, the actions you take, and the results you achieve

Blanchard Executive Coach Kate Larsen shared the following analogy with me to describe how reframing works.1 You hop into your car and start the engine. The radio is already on and is playing a song on one of your preset stations. The song is like the voice in your head (a.k.a. your self-talk), often filled with emotion. The preset station is the equivalent of a long-held assumption or belief.

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Medium 9780253008589

Big Ten Tournament: Indiana VS. Wisconsin, 3-9-12 (71-79)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Cody Zeller (40) manages to keep control of the ball and hit the bucket as Wisconsin Badgers forward Mike Bruesewitz (31) defends during the Indiana Wisconsin men’s basketball game at the Big Ten Tournament at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, Ind., Friday, March 9, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

Of course the dagger came from Rob Wilson. How else could this one have possibly ended? On just about every previous occasion in the second half when Indiana threatened to finally erase Wisconsin’s lead, the previously anonymous Wisconsin senior guard stepped up with a huge shot to knock the Hoosiers’ back. It was only fitting that he would hit the shot to bury them.

And that was exactly what happened with 35 seconds to go when Wilson swished a rainbow 3-pointer to give the Badgers a 72-65 lead, effectively crushing the Hoosiers’ hopes in the quarterfinals of the Big Ten Tournament. That shot gave Wilson, who came into the game averaging 3.1 points per game, a career high 30 points, and the Badgers hit enough free throws to take a 79-71 victory in front of 18,484 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse and advance to today’s 1:40 p.m. semifinal against Michigan State.

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Medium 9780253010285

23 Divine Insanity

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

From his perch atop the team bench, Pete Gill raised his bare arms like wings and, with a high-pitched, otherworldly warble, took flight, more like a drunken pelican than a majestic eagle. So stupidly happy was he that for a moment he thought he might just keep winging his way up and up, looping through rafters of galvanized steel, punching through sheet metal and tar, and sailing on and on to commingle with planets and stars and distant nebulae and never, never, ever come down to salty earth again.

But he did come down, and Roy Allen was there to greet him with the kind of loving embrace that two grown men of their certain persuasion were not supposed to share, not openly in 1963, but which we must now look kindly upon, because the love was genuine and it was mutual and it was pure. For several seconds, they hippity-hopped and bippity-bounced and slippity-slapped each other, like silly children on a trampoline, emitting strange musical sounds of joy beyond words, because there were no words to express them. The players too were in similar flights of ecstasy, and Pete and Roy soon joined them in a heap of scrambled eggs at center court, wiggling and giggling in a mad mindless rapture of sheer delight.

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Medium 9780253002952

6 Decolonizing Gender Performativity: A Thesis for Emancipation in Early Chicana Feminist Thought (1969–1979)

ARTURO J ALDAMA Indiana University Press ePub

DAPHNE V. TAYLOR-GARCÍA

In the early twenty-first century, our visual field is still gendered by colonial/racial dynamics. Many of the first Chicana feminist writers foregrounded an analysis of colonization in their evaluation of the struggles of contemporary US women of color, directly connecting the 1960s uprisings in the United States to those in the Caribbean, South America, Africa, China, and more. Pathbreaking documents written by Chicana feminists in the 1970s that grappled with intersectional injustices and the challenge of exposing the stifling role of racialized gender dynamics illuminated a consistent connection between colonialism and contemporary struggles.1

Bernice Rincón’s 1971 piece titled “La Chicana: Her Role in the Past and Her Search for a New Role in the Future” encapsulated the sentiment of a generation caught between revolutionary action, on the one hand, and culturally sedimented expectations of being “women,” on the other. Rincón wrote,

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Medium 9780253008589

Ncaa Tournament: Indiana VS. VCU, 3-17-12 (63-61)

The Herald-Times Indiana University Press ePub

Indiana Hoosiers forward Will Sheehey (10) celebrates the Hoosier win during the Indiana Virginia Commonwealth 2012 NCAA Men’s Basketball third round game at the Rose Garden in Portland, Ore., Saturday, March 17, 2012.

By Dustin Dopirak

Will Sheehey grabbed the ball on the left baseline after Victor Oladipo’s shot was blocked and flashed an involuntary smile, because he knew.

It mattered not that the sophomore swingman was in perhaps the biggest pressure situation of his basketball career, or that the shot he was about to take could be the one that either continued Indiana’s magical 2011-12 season with a dramatic late comeback or led to its eventual end. When he gets that look, that wide open, it goes in. Every time.

“Will’s mid-range is almost automatic,” Oladipo said. “When he shot it, I knew it was going in as soon as it left his hands.”

It did, and then on the other end, Virginia Commonwealth guard Rob Brandenberg’s 3-pointer for the win hit off the front of the rim — and after hanging above it for a perceived eternity — fell over the back end to give the No. 4 Hoosiers a breathtaking 63-61 NCAA Tournament victory over the No. 12 seed Rams, a berth in the Sweet 16 and a rematch with No. 1 Kentucky.

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Medium 9780253010285

7 Too Much Is Not Enough

Mike Roos Quarry Books ePub

As the August twilight faded over the roof of the whitewashed barn, Maurice Keusch dribbled with his back to the homemade basket, nailed to the barn boards. His brother Dennis, nicknamed Red, guarded him closely, blanketing his every movement with the special ferocity they reserved for these intense personal games of one-on-one. In an effort to break free, Maurice faked sharply to his right, then spun left to go up for a quick jumper, but Red, the skilled defenseman, recovered quickly and leaped up with his left arm extended, forcing the shot to go much higher than Maurice intended. Red then pivoted and planted his right foot firmly atop Maurice’s and successfully pinned him to the bare hard clay that served as their basketball court. When the ball hit the front of the rim and sprung harmlessly away, Red was in ready position for the defensive rebound.

“Hey! Watch the foot!” Maurice cried, looking around for an imaginary official. “He fouled me, ref!”

“Ref didn’t see it!” Red grinned as he dribbled out to the fifteen-foot range to begin his own offensive possession.

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