1041 Chapters
Medium 9781576752302

Choice 6: Emotional Kung Fu

Manz, Charles C. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

The greatest martial arts are the gentlest. They allow the attacker the opportunity to fall down. The greatest generals do not rush into every battle. They offer the enemy many opportunities to make self-defeating errors.

—Lao Tzu33

In kung fu, an ancient Chinese art of self-defense, emphasis is placed on using any attacking force to your advantage. Instead of resisting a direct assault, the practitioner averts and redirects the energy. For example, if a punch is thrown at chest level, the defender might fluidly turn 90 degrees to avert the blow while adding an additional push or pull “helping” the attacker to proceed in the direction he or she was already heading. Instead of pitting strength against strength, kung fu calls for using any force thrown your way to actually help you accomplish an outcome that you desire, such as sending opponents to the ground with the energy of their attack.70

As pointed out by the 2,500 year old writings in the Tao Te Ching (known as the Tao), credited to the ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu: “The person who initiates the attack is off center and easily thrown.” However, it also goes on to say, “Even so, have respect for an attacker. Never surrender your compassion or use your skill to harm another needlessly.”34 The same logic can be applied to emotional conflicts. Rather than resisting an emotional attack, we can use its energy to work toward a solution.

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Medium 9781605095233

Chapter 13 What Is the Meaning of Life?

Leider, Richard J. Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

One should not search for an abstract meaning of life. Everyone has [his or her] own vocation or mission in life to carry out a concrete assignment, which demands fulfillment.

Viktor Frankl

From birth onward, we are all growing older, but are we also growing up, or maturing? Aging belongs to the body, and maturing belongs to the spirit. Aging requires nothing special from us; maturing requires a spiritual quest. Maturity is spiritual wisdom embodied.

We all long to grow in wisdom as well as in years, but unless we make conscious choices to do so, we may simply grow old. What keeps us from growing up? How is maturity gained?

This chapter will explore those questions and discuss the vital links between wisdom, spirituality, and the meaning of life, and our purpose.

If we live as victims, without choosing, we simply become old. But when we age with conscious choice, we can walk the path of spiritual evolution and grow whole, mature, wise. These are the only two choices.

What stands in the way of choosing the spiritual path to wholeness and wisdom? Time. The number one pressure on people today is lack of time. Technology encourages us to be ”on” twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week via computers, smart phones, and other devices. Electronic gadgets have done away with boundaries to work, making us available outside normal work hours, even on weekends and holidays and during vacations. For more and more of us, the workday never ends.

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Medium 9781622500291

Jury Duty

Saddleback Educational Publishing Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

name

_________________________________________

date ____________________________

JURY DUTY

Is the defendant guilty or not guilty? A jury is a group of citizens chosen to listen to evidence in a trial and to reach a decision. As a U.S. citizen, you might someday be called to serve on a jury. Here are some words you would need to know.

A. Find the hidden words in the puzzle.

Words may go up, down, across, backward, or diagonally. When you circle a word on the puzzle, check it off the vocabulary list.

___ courtroom

___ foreman

___ duty

___ deliberate

___ verdict

___ panel

___ sequester

___ jury box

___ peers

___ unanimous

___ guilty

___ trial

___ innocent

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B. Complete the following poem with words from Part A. Use the first letters and the rhyming pattern as clues.

TRIAL BY JURY  

He’d hired a slick lawyer

Known as Rudy the Fox.

Now Rudy smiled as he stood by the court  j_________ b________.

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Medium 9781523084616

CHAPTER 9 Shifting Your Set Point: The Wellness Equation

Senn, Larry Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

The greatest discovery of my generation is that a human being can alter his life by altering his attitudes of mind.

—WILLIAM JAMES

The benefits of living life up the Mood Elevator are obvious. Fortunately, most people seem to be born with access to a naturally healthy state of mind. Our default setting is to be up the Mood Elevator. That’s our home base—and it’s only a thought away.

Medical experts tells us that all people have a “set point” when it comes to body temperature—a personal temperature index that is close to the normal 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit but that may be slightly higher or slightly lower. Similarly, most people have a set point for their weight—the number we fluctuate around and keep coming back to.

We also tend to have a set point on the Mood Elevator—one that we can shift through a couple of deliberate life practices. One practice involves adjusting your habitual mental state through certain simple behavior adjustments. I discuss this practice in chapter 10.

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Medium 9781523094578

6: Acceptance

Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

This being human is a guest house. Every morning a new arrival. A joy, a depression, a meanness, some momentary awareness comes as an unexpected visitor. Welcome and attend them all! Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows, who violently sweep your house empty of all its furniture, still, treat each guest honorably. He may be clearing you out for some new delight.1

RUMI

Shizuko was 43 years old, in the mid-stages of ALS and losing voluntary control of her body. The first time I sat by her bedside and talked to her, I became aware of an intense feeling of fear inside myself. I wondered what it was like for her, living inside that crippled body. I struggled to be mindful, but kept imagining how beautiful she must have been and how tragic it was that her body was now being ravaged by such a debilitating disease.

Despite her deterioration, Shizuko always smiled when we were together. I was confused and doubted her sincerity at first. Why wasn’t she crying? Why wasn’t she raging against her cruel fate? Instead, she expressed gratitude and appreciation for the doctors, the nurses, her family, me, and the good life with which she was blessed.

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