163 Chapters
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Medium 9781574411522

14 Craft Shop

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter fourteen

craft shop

T

here are perhaps only three ways an inmate may legally make money while he is in TDCJ. One is to write and then market his fiction, essays and poetry to free-world magazines. Another is to paint or draw and sell his artwork to interested buyers outside the walls. Both of these moneymaking ideas are subject to not just individual talent but to the mails, and to the hit-and-miss assistance of outside parties.

TDCJ offers one way for inmates who keep clear disciplinary records to make money while inside the walls, with all work and most sales being done by the inmates. It’s called the craft shop, or the “piddling” shop, and it is a privilege not to be dismissed lightly. The craft shop is just that: an area where inmates work on leather goods, jewelry, wood projects, paintings, fanciful stick creations—any of a number of personal expressions that can be done at a minimum of cost and then sold to officers or visitors or marketed to the free-world.

Inmates within the shops, called piddlers, usually begin as apprentices, or helpers, and work their way up the ladder as space in the craft shop allows. A determined, hard-working piddler who produces quality goods can make over $12,000 a year while still performing his assigned duties for the system. That may not sound like much money, but it does

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Medium 9781574413083

Appendix • Data Archives and Repositories

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Annual Survey Data:

Survey Data and Documentation. Atlanta, Ga.: Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health

Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services.

CDC WONDER [Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research]. Atlanta, Ga.: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services.

Compendium of National Juvenile Justice Data Sets. Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Consolidated Federal Funds Report. Washington, D.C.: Governments Division, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce.

Data Analysis Tools. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of

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Medium 9781574414325

Chapter 3 – Food

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER THREE

food

Inmates in Texas prison eat in the chow halls because they have to, not because they want. Any chef will tell you that the quality of a meal drops with the amount of people you have to feed. In TDCJ, minimally trained cooks prepare from 1,000 to 3,000 meals three times a day, under minimal quality standards, and with only the pride they and an occasional professional wearing TDCJ gray bring to their jobs. The courts have ruled, and rightly so, that good taste cannot be dictated. The standard applied to institutional meals is that they be hot and nutritious. In turn, state dieticians and various medical experts set out the nutritional standards TDCJ follows. Inmates get three meals a day, and if an inmate eats all that he is offered, he will be assured of the minimal daily requirements of vitamins and minerals that medical experts say he needs to survive.

Meals consist of: three four-ounce servings of three different vegetables; a four-ounce serving of beans; a scoop of potatoes or rice; a piece of meat (except at breakfast); two pieces of bread, or two biscuits, or a three inch square of cornbread; and dessert at lunch (which can be cake, pie, gelatin, or pudding). That’s it. If you complain, or ask for more, chances are good that the staff will take your tray and order you from the chow hall.

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Medium 9781574413083

Chapter 1 • Starting Points

R. Scott Harnsberger University of North Texas Press PDF

Basic Resources

•001 Crime in Texas. Austin: Uniform Crime Reporting Section, Crime Information Bureau, Crime Records Service, Texas Department of Public Safety

[annual, 1976–date].

[full report]

[summary report]

The State of Texas officially adopted the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR)

Program on January 1, 1976. The Texas Department of Public Safety has the responsibility for collecting, validating, and tabulating UCR data received from over 1,000 law enforcement agencies in the state. Each annual report is organized as follows:

Chapter 1: The UCR Program;

Chapter 2: Texas Crime Analysis (including the Texas Crime Clock);

Chapter 3: Index Crime Analysis (murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson);

Chapter 4: Selected Non-Index Crimes (DUI arrests, drug abuse arrests, drug seizures, and weapons arrests);

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Medium 9781574414455

Chapter 11: Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission

Lorie Rubenser and Gloria Priddy University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 11

Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission

Introduction

Brewing beer and making hard alcohol has occurred in this country from almost the moment of European settlement. Each industry has followed its own path of development, followed closely by attempts to control almost all aspects. Government control focuses mostly on taxation and regulation of sales.1

The American experience with alcohol has been controversial for much of our history, culminating in a period of Prohibition. The 18th Amendment, passed in 1919, banned the “manufacture, sale, or transportation . . .” of alcohol. Prohibition lasted 13 years and was ultimately a failure. The 21st Amendment ended Prohibition in 1933.2

The end of Prohibition did not signal an end to the issues surrounding the alcohol industry, however. The controversy over the proper role of alcohol continues, with groups like Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) attempting to bring to light the bad side of alcohol usage. Drunk driving, public intoxication, and other offenses are violations of the law, which most law enforcement agencies may address.

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Medium 9781574411522

Appendix B Medical and Dental Services Offered TDCJ Inmates

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix B

Medical and Dental Services

Offered TDCJ Inmates

I. Primary Care

This is the inmate’s first point of contact with the health care system.

This level offers medical care for the large number of conditions that frequently occur in the population and which do not require sophisticated technical capability to diagnose or treat. This level also provides for the triage and referral of patients to the secondary level, which offers more specialized diagnostic procedures and treatment. All units in the

TDCJ-ID offer at least primary care.

Services provided:

A. Self-care—personal hygiene and care for a condition that can be self-treated.

B. First aid services—services for a minor condition that can be treated with over-the-counter products by uncredentialed person trained in first aid.

C. Basic Ambulatory Clinic Outpatient Services:

1. Medical services offered: a) medication administration b) screening physical exams c) immunizations d) personal health and hygiene counseling e) nutrition counseling f) basic history and physical exams and evaluation g) diagnosis and treatment of simple illnesses and minor injuries h) specimen collection and basic laboratory procedures i) basic radiology services (chest, abdomen, KUB, extremities) j) eyeglass fittings k) EKGs l) Basic respiratory therapy services

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Medium 9781574411638

Appendix A Missing and Unaccounted For

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix A

Missing and Unaccounted For

Research for this book produced tantalizing clues about projectiles that are unknown to the author and could not be documented for inclusion in the book.

This list of “missing” projectiles is provided below, together with the data source where they were identified. They are “unaccounted for” among surviving projectiles.

Hopefully others will do additional research and locate these projectiles. Some of these are field calibers, but are included as part of an effort to expand the knowledge in the field:

Caliber (In.)

2.9

3.0

3.4

3.5

3.67

3.67

3.8

4.2

4.2

4.5

4.62

4.62

4.62

4.62

5.1

5.82

5.82

6.4

6.4

7.0

7.0

7.0

7.0

7.5

Design

Hotchkiss Shell

Stafford Shell

Hotchkiss Bolt

Hotchkiss Case Shot and Shell

Hopson Shot

Stafford Shell

Schenkl Case Shot and Shell

Absterdam shell

Hotchkiss Shot

Dyer Shot

Hotchkiss Shell

Sawyer Bolts and Shells

Schenkl Canister

Schenkl Shells

Cochran Shell

Hotchkiss Shell

Parrott Bolt

Dyer Shells and Bolts2

Hopson Shot

Brooke Concussion Shell

Hotchkiss Bolts and Shells

Sawyer Shell

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Medium 9781603446938

Part 4 Applying the Rules and Covering All the Angles

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

A complaint was registered with the state’s attorney general that our organization was engaging in unlicensed gambling during its annual fundraising convention. The complaint was passed on to the agency having jurisdiction. Shortly after an inquiry, we received a cease-and-desist order. We learned of this a few weeks before the day the convention was to begin. The date and location of the convention had been set for at least three years.

The subject of the order was a series of raffles we ran at the event. Raffles had been run for years in the state with no problem. We had retained the services of counsel and thought we had been diligent in complying with all laws. No one suspected problems, but there it was: an order to halt all raffles until we applied for and received a proper permit.

We quickly learned it was a simple matter to receive a permit, which was required by the locality in which the event was being held. All we had to do was submit a proper application and pay a required fee, but given the length of time it would take to process the application, we had no choice but to cancel all raffles planned for the event.

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Medium 9781574411522

22 What to do in Emergencies

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter twenty-two

what to do in emergencies

T

his topic was the birthing idea for this book. In January of 1993, my brother fell ill and my family was not only unsure how to contact me— they did not know the procedure to follow so that I might attend his funeral after he died. This hurt my family and myself deeply, that I could not be there to receive and give comfort. The Texas prison system places many conditions on this type of furlough, but it is allowed. But in such a situation, time is of the essence. If you want to get your relative out in time to see his dying mother, or to attend a memorial service for his daughter, then you must follow TDCJ guidelines, especially the guidelines that specify the people authorized to contact TDCJ with the details of a situation.

For TDCJ officials, this is an issue loaded with problems. Most state officials are sincerely sorry when tragedy befalls the family members of convicts and they do not want to seem heartless. However, security is a priority, and the system cannot allow just anyone to call and say, “John

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Medium 9781574411522

12 Religion

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter twelve

religion

I

f adversity draws one closer to the Lord, the skies over most prisons should be ringing with hymns and the fences humming with prayer. Most convicts were not religious people before coming to jail—that truth is evident in their reckless, hurtful, selfish actions. However, the Lord is active in Texas prisons. Inmates who wish to pursue a spiritual awakening are extended almost every opportunity to do so. TDCJ extends quite a bit of freedom to inmates for them to pursue individual beliefs and practices.

All inmates are encouraged to believe, worship, and to study their particular religion. Participation in any worship is voluntary, unless an inmate is assigned to one of the pre-release units that has a focus on spiritual fellowship as a foundation for rehabilitation, such as the Carol Vance Unit, which houses the Inner Change Faith-Based Treatment Program.

Many things contribute to the degree of religious freedom and array of religious activities on a particular unit: the dedication of the unit chaplains; the involvement of community volunteers; the religious beliefs of the warden. In any case, this is one area where what TDCJ practices often exceed what its policy requires.

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Medium 9781603446938

Part 2 Creating the Perfect Setting

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

Here I was, head of an organization poised to raise well over $500,000 from the people filling the auditorium, yet I had only a conceptual image of what was to happen next. No one had ever seen it. There was no way to have seen it, because there was only one opportunity to do it, and now it was time. The president of the organization didn’t have a clue what was going to happen, and he was starting to fidget. He would soon become upset. The invited guests were enjoying themselves—so far. Waitstaff were serving drinks, which was expected, of course.

I could hear the small talk starting. People were beginning to wonder what was going on. This event could be an absolute smash hit—at least in theory. We were assembled in an auditorium. Nothing was onstage. The nothingness was purposefully obvious. Looking onto the stage was like looking into a massive black hole. Nothing was in the seating area. Nothing was in the aisles. Nothing was anywhere and everywhere. A few people sat in the auditorium’s seats, but mostly they stood in small groups in aisles and just waited in the emptiness.

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Medium 9781574411546

11 Wildlife First Aid and Rescue

Andrea Dawn Lopez University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter Eleven

wing. This was confirmed when the man tried to approach the bird and he couldn’t fly away. With birds, not being able to fly is a major indication that something is wrong.

As I pulled into the driveway of the small ranch house, the owner ran toward me, yelling that the bird had just managed to crouch down and crawl under his house. There was an opening about a foot and a half high. The bird went in there.

I got out of my car and pulled out a small blanket from the back seat. I also put on a pair of leather gloves. These two tools would be for my protection as I tried to capture the bird. From the man’s description of him, it sounded like he was a great blue heron.

Great blue herons stand about four feet tall. Their pointed beaks are six to eight inches long, powerful tools that they use to impale their prey. Herons eat things like fish, amphibians, and small rodents.

But they also use their beaks to impale their enemies when they’re threatened! I would have to be very protective of my eyes, as well as the rest of my body, when I approached this cornered bird.

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Medium 9781603446938

1. Introduction

Rudolph A. Rosen Texas A&M University Press ePub

Standing near the former president of the United States was a tall, handsome African dressed in a blaze of traditional Maasai red. Barely 20 years old, the young man was the son of a chief and in time would become a chief in his African homeland. But he was not with the former president because of politics or tribal status. He was a student whose education was being funded at a leading university in South Africa by members of the audience. He was among the “motivational elements” assembled at this international nonprofit organization’s premier fundraising event where more than 15,000 members had assembled for four days of fun and fundraising.

At one of the event’s several formal dinners, to be followed by a major auction, members heard the young African speak of his dedication to the cause of wildlife conservation. They listened intently as he told of his commitment to take what he had learned from members of the organization during his visit and go back to his country to use his new knowledge as a leader. The members were enthusiastic and renewed their commitment to fund education of young Africans at African universities.

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Medium 9781574411638

Brooke

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Brooke

Cdr. John Mercer Brooke, CSN, is best known for his designs of rifled cannon and projectiles for the Confederacy. He also designed the torpedoes and armor for the CSS

Virginia and oversaw its manufacture by Tredegar Foundry.1 Brooke was so highly regarded by both sides that Union Adm. David Porter said he only regretted the loss of two officers to the Confederacy from the United States Navy: Brooke and Catesby Jones.2 Porter did not mean to be flattering with that comment. After the war he said that Brooke had done more harm to the North than any other man in the South.3

Like his early work in designing cannon, Brooke’s early projectile patterns were modified versions or outright copies of existing designs. For example, in working on projectiles for the CSS Virginia, Brooke asked for designs from the Gosport Navy Yard ordnance officer, then modified the Dahlgren pattern for a shell design. He wrote in his notes, “200 shells are being cast at the Tredegar—of my design—Dahlgren pattern serving as the basis.”4 A number of experiments were conducted using Brooke’s Dahlgren designs,

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Medium 9781574414455

Chapter 7: Cattle Brand Inspectors

Lorie Rubenser and Gloria Priddy University of North Texas Press ePub

Chapter 7

Cattle Brand Inspectors

Introduction

Societies as far back as the ancient Egyptians practiced the branding of animals.1 The brand is essentially a label denoting ownership, rather like a serial number on a laptop.

An array of laws and rules developed around the branding of animals to ensure proper branding, use of different brands by different people, transfer of ownership for a branded animal, etc. Regulating and enforcing these laws now falls to the Cattle Brand Inspectors, licensed peace officers with expertise in livestock.

History of the Position

A brand registry became the most convenient way of ensuring each person, ranch, or company used a separate brand. In the United States, the earliest brand registry still in existence is from Richmond County, St. George, Staten Island, New York. The registry includes brands, court cases, road surveys, and other municipal information. Although the earliest brands in this registry are not dated, they appear to come from 1678.2

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