362 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781608682652

10. Eckhart as Sufi: Meister Eckhart Meets Rumi, Hafiz, Ibn El-Arabi, and Avicenna

Matthew Fox New World Library ePub

Meister Eckhart Meets Rumi, Hafiz, Ibn El-Arabi, and Avicenna

Ah, one spark flew and burned the house of my heart.

— RUMI

In the spark of the soul there is hidden something like the original outbreak of all goodness, something like a brilliant light which incessantly gleams, and something like a burning fire which burns incessantly. This fire is nothing other than the Holy Spirit.

— MEISTER ECKHART

Love is the creed I hold: Wherever turn His camels, Love is still my creed and faith.

— IBN EL-ARABI

I have made the journey into Nothing. I have become that flame that needs No fuel.

— HAFIZ

When Passion for Creation, my book of sermons by Meister Eckhart, appeared in 1980, the very first response I received was not from a Christian theologian or preacher but from a Sufi. His correspondence was long, and it surprised me, pleasantly so. At that time, like most in our culture, I was less aware of Sufism. Today, the West is much more familiar with it, thanks to the dissemination of Rumi’s stunning poetry, to Hafiz’s amazing work, and to the Dances of Universal Peace inspired by Samuel L. Lewis, which has moved (literally and spiritually) so many people around the world.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253205667

The Man of Cuautla

Felicitas D. Goodman Indiana University Press ePub

For years Ursula S., a Swiss painter, had been telling me about a figurine she had inherited from her grandmother. Her uncle had immigrated to Mexico and settled in Cuautla, not too far from Mexico City, and when his new house was being built, the workers came across a perfect little clay sculpture and brought it to him. During a visit to Mexico, Ursula’s grandmother saw it in her son’s house and liked it so much, her son gave it to her. Ursula was familiar with it from early childhood, and when her grandmother died, she inherited it. She finally brought a photograph of it to our workshop in Switzerland in the spring of 1987 (pl. 64).

The man is sitting flat on the ground, his legs apart and bent at the knees. His right hand is on his knee, the left arm is stretched a bit more than the right, and his left hand is placed somewhat to the side of his knee. He wears a feather crown, and his head is slightly tilted back. His tongue is between his lips.

What the Swiss participants told after we did the posture did not suggest any particular experiential type to me, healing, for instance, or divination. If anything, it seemed to be a spirit journey of sorts, but not a very productive one. Urs R. repeatedly saw three “pointed mountains.” Kathrin told about a wall and hearing rocks falling down a stone stairway. Monica had to look down, very deep down, past legs of stone. There were shadows of lions, according to Romana, but they had no manes. She came to a cleft in the earth; it was like a cave, and a shaft of light illuminated two or three more caves. Vrenie turned into a spectator:

See All Chapters
Medium 9780980184839

The Symphony

Jed McKenna Wisefool Press PDF

In this chapter, The Symphony, Ahab the man takes a final look back over the life that has brought him to this end. He considers his lost humanity and sees it in the “magic glass” of Starbuck’s eye.............

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253205667

Appendix: Some Practical Points

Felicitas D. Goodman Indiana University Press ePub

—If you would like to try any of the postures I have described, you will need rhythmic stimulation. With some practice, you can record a tape for yourself, using either a drum or a rattle. The beat should be even and rather fast. Mine is timed at 200–210 beats per minute, and one session should last about fifteen minutes.

—Familiarize yourself with the posture first, then do a breathing exercise. It consists of fifty light, normal, complete breaths, with inhaling, exhaling, and pause constituting one breath unit. At the conclusion of this exercise, assume the posture once more, close your eyes, and start listening to the beat of the instrument. After a while, you may no longer hear the soundtrack. Do not worry about it. Your nervous system registers it anyway, although out of awareness. If you try to get back to the sound, you may interrupt your vision.

—As soon as the soundtrack stops, and provided you are clinically healthy, you will return to ordinary consciousness. Once in a great while a person does not manage this transition well. For this reason, a beginner should always have a companion. If the companion notices that the trancer does not come to right away, the first thing to do is to call his/her name. Gently releasing the trancer’s posture is also a good strategy, and providing a glass of water will help, too. As the group leader, you will occasionally go into a light trance yourself. One of my participants told that as she was rattling, her Indian spirit friend appeared before her and rattled along with her.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781771870702

Spring: Godfingering

Ratzlaff, Lloyd Thistledown Press ePub

Spring
Godfingering

See All Chapters
Medium 9781855750081

CHAPTER SIX: Counter transference

Christopher Dare Karnac Books ePub

In chapters three, four, and five we have discussed the treatment alliance and transference, concepts that have been used in connection with aspects of the relationship between the patient and therapist. These two clinical concepts originated within the psychoanalytic treatment situation, and we have indicated some possibilities of extension outside it. Both concepts emphasize processes occurring within the patient and tend to stress one side of the relationship only. Even the concept of treatment alliance, although nominally appearing to include the roles of both patient and therapist, has tended to be regarded from the point of view of processes and attitudes within the patient. However, there has been some change in this regard, particularly since the 1970s, in that the therapist’s attitudes, feelings, and professional stance have increasingly been taken into account.

Just as the term ‘transference’ is often used loosely as a synonym for the totality of the patient’s relation to his therapist, so the term ‘countertransference’ is often employed in a general sense (both within psychoanalysis and outside it) to describe all the therapist’s feelings and attitudes towards his patient, even to indicate facets of ordinary non-therapeutic relationships (Kemper, 1966). Such a usage is very different from what was originally intended, and, as a consequence, confusion has arisen about the precise meaning of the term which was first used by Freud (1910d) in discussing the future prospects of psychoanalysis. He said of the psychoanalyst: ‘We have become aware of the “counter-transference”, which arises in him as a result of the patient’s influence on his unconscious feelings, and we are almost inclined to insist that he shall recognize this counter-transference in himself and overcome it … no psychoanalyst goes further than his own complexes and internal resistances permit/

See All Chapters
Medium 9780989175913

27. From The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams

Jed McKenna Wisefool Press PDF
In his shack was an old beaten-up armchair, an old scratched table, an old mattress, some cushions and a stove that was small but warm. He stood up and found a glass that was lying on the floor by the mattress. He poured in a measure from his whisky bottle. He sat again.

“Perhaps some other people are coming to see me,” he said.

The door opened.

“Hello?” said the man.

“Ah, excuse me,” said Zarniwoop, “I have reason to believe…”

“Do you rule the Universe?” said Zaphod.

The man smiled at him.

“I try not to,” he said. ................. See All Chapters
Medium 9780980184822

Epilogue

Jed McKenna Wisefool Press PDF

If I were to reduce this book and my teachings to their essence, I would say it all comes down to nothing more than this: Think for yourself and figure out what’s true. That’s it. Ask yourself what’s true until you know. Everything else in this book, everything else I have to say on the subject, turns on that center. That’s the note I’d like to end on. It’s your show. It’s your universe. There’s no one else here, just you, and nothing is being withheld from you. You are completely on your own. Everything is available for direct knowing. No one else has anything you need. No one else can lead you, pull you, push you or carry you. No one else is necessary to your success. It cannot be simpler; you are asleep and you can wake up. If you understand that, you’ll understand that it’s the best news you could possibly receive. Rejoice! The way is open unto thee..........

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253000958

A Road into Chaos and Old Night

Scott Russell Sanders Indiana University Press ePub

When I first read a handful of his essays in college, I didn’t much care for Ralph Waldo Emerson. He seemed too high-flown, too cocksure, too earnest. I couldn’t imagine he had ever sweated or doubted. His sentences rang with a magisterial certainty that I could never muster. In the library, his portrait gazed from the wall with a superior air; his name was carved in stone alongside the names of other literary immortals. More like an angel than a man, he seemed to float above the messy Earth where I labored in confusion. He rarely told stories, rarely framed arguments, rarely focused on any creature or place, but instead he piled one oracular statement atop another like a heap of jewels, each one hard and polished and cold.

While resisting Emerson, I fell under the spell of another citizen of Concord, Henry David Thoreau, who was agreeably cranky and earthy. Here was a man who rode rivers, climbed mountains, ambled through forests, and told of his journeys in wide-awake narratives, as I aspired to do. He built a cabin with his own hands, hoed beans, baked bread, and chopped wood. Thoreau kept his feet on the ground, his eyes and ears alert to the homely world—ants fighting on a stump, mud thawing on a railroad bank, men building a bridge, skunk cabbage perfuming a swamp. He led an outdoor life, keeping his distance from the gossipy town. He stood up against slavery, protested the Mexican war, went to jail for refusing to pay the poll tax, and wrote prose that seemed to me as wild as the loons he chased across Walden Pond.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253000958

The Force of Spirit

Scott Russell Sanders Indiana University Press ePub

My wife’s father is dying, and I can think of little else, because I love him and I love my wife. Once or twice a week, Ruth and I drive the forty miles of winding roads to visit him in the nursing home. Along the way we pass fields bursting with new corn, stands of trees heavy with fresh leaves, pastures deep in grass. In that long grass the lambs and calves and colts hunt for tender shoots to nibble and for the wet nipples of their mothers to suck. The meadows are thick with flowers, and butterflies waft over the blossoms like petals torn loose by wind. The spring this year was lavish, free of late frosts, well soaked with rain, and now in early June the Indiana countryside is all juiced up.

On our trip to the nursing home this morning, I drive while Ruth sits beside me knitting. Strand by strand, a sweater grows under her hands. We don’t talk much, because she must keep count of her stitches. To shape the silence, we play a tape of Mozart’s Requiem from a recent concert in which Ruth sang, and I try to detect her clear soprano in the weave of voices. The car fills with the music of sorrow. The sound rouses aches in me from earlier losses, the way cold rouses pain from old bone breaks.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781608682652

2. The Christ of the Cosmos: Meister Eckhart Meets Teilhard de Chardin and Thomas Berry

Matthew Fox New World Library ePub

Meister Eckhart Meets Teilhard de Chardin and Thomas Berry

The cosmic sense must have been born as soon as humanity found itself facing the frost, the sea and the stars. And since then we find evidence of it in all our experience of the great and unbounded: in art, in poetry, and in religion.

— TEILHARD DE CHARDIN

Every being has its own voice. Every being declares itself to the entire universe. Every being enters into communion with other beings.

— THOMAS BERRY

All creatures are gladly doing the best they can to express God.

— MEISTER ECKHART

The first chapter held up awe and wonder as the starting point of our spiritual journey, but Rabbi Heschel reminds us: “Wonder is an act in which the mind confronts the universe.” It is the universe itself that awakens our wonder. Without this cosmic reverence, we are lost, we are adrift, we are set up for detours and the worship of strange idols. Heschel warns us: “Forfeit your sense of awe and the universe becomes a market place for you.” In other words, to abandon our capacity for awe and wonder is to set up a strange religion of marketplace cosmology. Consumerism replaces the universe. Who can deny that this happens in our world today, as the media, its chief preacher, shouts its wares with incessant advertising 24/7?

See All Chapters
Medium 9780989175944

ACT V: ANATTA

Jed McKenna Wisefool Press PDF

ACT V: ANATTA

Transition music, sung by kids:

WHILE THE MOON HER WATCH IS KEEPING

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

WHILE THE WEARY WORLD IS SLEEPING

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

O'ER THY SPIRIT GENTLY STEALING

VISIONS OF DELIGHT REVEALING

BREATHES A PURE AND HOLY FEELING

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

SETTING

Semi-rustic cabin interior, messy, lived in. The space is softly lit with candles and lamps. Entry door and stone fireplace audience left where a fire burns. Rocking chair beside the fireplace and a couch facing it. Audience right, kitchenette, hall and bathroom out of view. Nearby a telephone stand with an old black rotary phone and a wall mirror. Downstage audience right, a small dining table used as a messy desk, littered with paper in sheets and crumpled balls, water bottles, coffee cups, etc, a laptop on one end and a printer on a chair, a desk lamp lights the laptop and more debris. A waste basket is overflowing and surrounded by crumpled paper.

CHARACTER

Julie: Thirty-ish female. Frazzled. Thin. Wears loose jeans and a baggy sweater, unkempt, no make-up, bare feet. Long messy hair.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781608682171

Asia and Oceania

PhD Patricia Monaghan New World Library ePub

China reaches from desert to tropics, from mountainous west to coastal east. Its culture represents an equally diverse ethnic background. China’s earliest civilizations were not the highly centralized bureaucracies of later Chinese life, nor were their mythologies the highly structured regimes of later centuries. Rather, eastern continental Asia was home to indigenous peoples whose mythologies were absorbed into developing religions.

Among these ethnic groups, women held considerably higher status than in later times. Women shamans mediated between this world and worlds beyond. Commentators note connections between the word for “shaman” and those for “mother,” “dance,” “fertility,” and “egg.” Thus the woman religious practitioner may be symbolically implied in myths where she does not appear. The role of women as religious leaders did not survive in China, although it did in Korea. China and Korea are discussed separately here.

Aboriginal Chinese religion forms the basis for Taoism and Confucianism, both properly called philosophies rather than religions. Taoism reached back to China’s shamanic roots with its emphasis on the balance of feminine (yin) and masculine (yang). Taoism’s founder was the sage Lao-Tzu of the sixth century BCE, author of the important Tao-te Ching. As Taoism became the religion of choice for imperial China, its pantheon began to reflect social organization of earthly life, resembling a bureaucracy complete with monthly reports to superior gods and annual performance reviews.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781608680306

Part 5: One-Minute Mindfulness for Nature, Spirituality, and Contemplation

Donald Altman New World Library ePub

Humility illuminates the deepest core of what it means to be J. J. human, how we are all frail and subject to error and how each of us is dependent upon the web of life into which we are interwoven. What this means for each of us is that eventually, like it or not, we will be cracked open and rendered vulnerable and naked by life. I am reminded of a concert I attended recently, where poet and songwriter Leonard Cohen performed. Before breaking into his song “The Bells,” he eloquently spoke a few of the song’s lyrics, alluding to the light that shines through the imperfect and cracked parts of ourselves.36

Being cracked open is not the same as being broken or enduring a Humpty Dumpty moment, unable to put ourselves back together. Neither does humility imply that we are weak and incapable. Leadership expert John Baldoni insightfully writes, “Humility is acceptance of individual limitations — I cannot do it alone — coupled with a sense of resolve to do something about it — I will enlist the help of others. That is the essence of leadership.”37 One-minute mindfulness helps the light of humility and growth shine through the cracks.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253000958

After the Flood

Scott Russell Sanders Indiana University Press ePub

A river poured through the landscape I knew as a child. It was the power of the place, gathering rain and snowmelt, surging through the valley under sun, under ice, under the bellies of fish and the curled brown boats of sycamore leaves. You will need a good map of Ohio to find the river I am talking about, the West Branch of the Mahoning. The stretch of it I knew best no longer shows on maps, a stretch that ran between wooded slopes and along the flanks of cornfields and pastures in the township of Charlestown, in Portage County, a rural enclave surrounded by the smokestacks and concrete of Akron, Youngstown, and Cleveland in the northeastern corner of the state.

Along that river bottom I gathered blackberries and hickory nuts, trapped muskrats, rode horses, followed baying hounds on the scent of raccoons. Spring and fall, I walked barefoot over the tilled fields, alert for arrowheads. Along those slopes I helped a family of Swedish farmers collect buckets of maple sap. On the river itself I skated in winter and paddled in summer, I pawed through gravel bars in search of fossils, I watched hawks preen and pounce, I courted and canoed and idled. This remains for me a primal landscape, imprinted on my senses, a place by which I measure every other place.

See All Chapters

Load more