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8 Vocal Changes: Marlon Brando, Innokenty Smoktunovsky, and the Sound of the 1950s

Lilya Kaganovsky Indiana University Press ePub

Oksana Bulgakowa

Translated from the German by Katrina Sark

THE BEST STUDIES of voice in film—by Michel Chion or Kaja Silverman—have examined disembodied, formless voices, voices as phantoms.1 However, signs of social and temporal anchoring of the electric voice—as part of the medial body—have been neglected by film theory. One does not have to be Professor Higgins to distinguish film voices of the 1930s from those of the 1990s, since the manner of speech depends not only on the quality of an individual voice that reveals the age, gender, appearance, and mood of the speaker but also on the historically, culturally, and socially determined speech patterns, on technical conditions of recording practices, and on artistic conventions. Norms, conventions, and parameters change at certain points in time. The history of technology is concerned with microphones and tape recorders, amplifiers and filters; linguistic studies conduct phonetic and prosodic analyses of speech patterns. Can film studies indicate traces of time in the electric voices and merge the historicity of the voice with the history of recording technology?

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6. Notes

James R. Currie Indiana University Press ePub

NOTES

PREFACE: A NO-MUSIC

An earlier version of this chapter appeared as “Postmodern Mozart and the Politics of the Mirror,” in Mozart Studies, edited by Simon P. Keefe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 214–242. Reprinted with permission.

1. Susan McClary, Conventional Wisdom: The Content of Musical Form (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000), 169. Here, in the final sentence of the last page of this book, McClary claims that “Western musician have always been reveling in the rubble.” “Reveling in the rubble” is her metaphor for the essentially postmodern notion that art is produced out of the preexisting musical materials and conventions in which any composer or performer is located.

2. For a more extensive analysis of the themes covered in the following political sketch, see my “Music after All,” Journal of the American Musicological Society 62 (Spring 2009): 145–203.

3. For a magnificently damning and succinct critique of Blair, see Tony Judt's “The Gnome in the Garden: Tony Blair and Britain's ‘Heritage,’” New York Review of Books (July 2001), reprinted in Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century (New York: Penguin Press, 2008), 219–32.

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Medium 9780253010124

11. Rock at the End of the Century

S. Kay Hoke INshort ePub

INTRODUCTION

Since the end of World War I the history of popular music in America has been one of interplay between musical styles and technological advances in sound reproduction. Of the many influences affecting the popular music scene, two are especially noteworthy: the introduction of microphones and amplifiers, allowing performers to project their sound without mastering the same techniques used by performers of art music; and the movement of mainstream popular music from a European-inspired written tradition to a vernacular style derived from oral tradition.

Until the 1920s the primary consumers of popular music were the literate middle and working classes, who had both the ability to read music and the means to buy a piano on which to reproduce it in the home. The emergence of affordable electronic sound reproduction made popular music accessible to a broad audience unconstrained by geography or the necessity for formal musical training. By 1925, control of the popular music industry had begun to shift from publishing houses to radio stations, record companies, and manufacturers of sound reproduction equipment. Popular music in the United States has always been dominated by styles directed toward and listened to by the so-called mainstream audience: urban, middle-class whites. In the first half of the century that music was the product of Tin Pan Alley; in the second half it has been rock. But styles particular to other groups in the population have sometimes attracted broad-based audiences as well—for example, the music of rural whites, first known as hillbilly and later as country, and the music of African Americans, which includes blues, jazz, and gospel.

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Medium 9780253007476

2 A New Wind Is Blowing through Chicago

Rick Kennedy Indiana University Press ePub

 

In 1922, Fred Wiggins was managing Starr Piano’s showroom at 423 South Wabash Avenue in downtown Chicago when he caught wind of a white dance band creating a stir at the Friars Inn, a basement club just a few blocks down the street. Young white musicians in their early twenties from New Orleans fronted the band, which played the syncopated, brazen music captivating American youth: jazz.

The scene was increasingly common in Prohibition Chicago. An influx of young Creole, African American, and white jazz musicians from New Orleans appeared on Chicago bandstands, a phenomenon driven largely by the mass movement of Southern blacks into Chicago’s South Side. Dixieland jazz imported from New Orleans, birthplace of the controversial music, was doing big business in boomtown Chicago’s theaters and dance halls. The historical exchange between young New Orleans players and their Chicago disciples was underway. Despite all the excitement, the trailblazing music they produced was virtually untapped by the nation’s record companies.

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Medium 9780253350787

1. Teacher

Estelle R. Jorgensen Indiana University Press ePub

 

 

 

The role of teacher is one of many facets of our lives or one of several functions that we fulfill as human beings. It is important to discover what it is to be a teacher and what place this persona will play in the totality of our lives. How we conceive of this function and its location in lived life determines how we go about being teachers. Will it consume us utterly, will it have a central but circumscribed role, or will it be an activity that is marginal to our purpose as creative musicians or ancillary to other things? Practically speaking, what a teacher is and the place of teaching in our lives are interconnected matters. There is no one answer to these questions and we need to discover answers for ourselves. What follows are aspects that I have discovered to be important in my role as a teacher, namely, being true to oneself, learning to listen to one’s inner teacher, accepting one’s limitations, teaching to one’s strengths, keeping an open mind, and developing one’s art-craft.

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Medium 9780253010223

Russian

Maurice Hinson Indiana University Press ePub

Chinese Contemporary Piano Pieces (Karlsen Publishers, Hong Kong 1979). Vol.I, 88pp. Ah Ping: The Moon Mirrored in the Pool. Wang Chien Chung: Plum Blossom Melody; Sakura. Yip Wai Hong: Memories of Childhood (6 miniatures). Kwo Chi Hung: 2 Yi Li Folk Songs. Chu Wang Hua: Sinkiang Capriccio. Lui Shi Kuen and Kuo Chi Hung: Battling the Typhoon. Post-Romantic pianistic figurations, much pentatonic usage, some charming and interesting moments. This collection is a good example of the type of piano writing going on in this area of the world today. Int. to M-D.

Chinese Piano Music for Children (N. Liao—Schott 7652 1990) 55pp. Written between 1973 and 1986 when Chinese music “increasingly absorbed the influences and ideas current in the new music of the West, without sacrificing its own tradition and national style” (from the score). Luting He (1903–1999): The Young Shepherd with his little Flute 1934; tender, artistic simplicity, national style. Shande Ding (1911–1995): Suite for Children (five pieces) 1953: folk-like but no folk songs are quoted. Tong Shang (1923– ): Seven Little Pieces after Folk Songs from Inner Mongolia 1953: a charming suite of folk song arrangements. Lisan Wang (1953– ): Sonatine 1957: three titled movements, cheerful, displays spirited humor. Int. to M-D.

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Medium 9781770906730

5: THE FRYING PAN AND THE FREEZER

Neil Peart ECW Press ePub

THE FRYING PAN AND THE FREEZER

JULY 2011

DURING THE FIRST RUN of this year’s continuation of the Time Machine tour (part deux) in April, Michael and I motorcycled between shows in the eastern United States and Canada. As described in “Eastern Resurrection,” the weather was cold, wet, and windy—even snowy farther north. Verily, we did suffer most grievously, and there were great chatterings of teeth and shiverings of limb.

Likewise, as told in “Singletrack Minds in the Sceptered Isle,” May in Europe was cold and wet for Brutus and me. (If not quite so biblical.)

However, back in the U.S. in June, riding with Michael again, all that changed. We went from the freezer to the frying pan—then back into the freezer.

Hence a couple of other titles I considered for this story: “A Season of Fire and Ice” (which felt too similar to an earlier Far and Away story, “Fire on Ice”) and “A Season of Swelter and Snow.” But the best metaphor seemed to be the frying pan.

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Medium 9780253010162

Part I. Critical Analysis of Physical Performance Techniques

Murray Grodner Indiana University Press ePub

PART 1

Critical Analysis of Physical Performance Techniques

Use of Self

In reading this book you will find the phrase “use of self” employed a number of times. I was asked by a reader of the original manuscript to clarify the meaning and reason for use of this phrase.

You may be familiar with the Alexander Technique. I took several lessons from various teachers of this philosophy of physical behavior. Initially, the Alexander teacher “maneuvered” head, neck and shoulders, and said little, leaving me wondering what I was supposed to take with me from the lesson. For a long time I was never quite sure what I was supposed to learn from the experience. Sometime later I found an Alexander teacher who was more verbal. I brought a bass to one lesson and we explored physical challenges presented by the double bass, experimenting with various positions suggested by the Alexander teacher. It became obvious that there really is not a perfect solution for physically dealing with the size of our instrument. There is only the most appropriate physical adaptation to an instrument the size and shape of the double bass. As time went by, I believe I found the answer to the goal of the Alexander teacher and my investigation of the possibility of physical positioning for playing double bass. It is the same goal that teachers of double bass should constantly be working toward: making the best use of self. Although I am not positive, I believe this might also be one of the goals of the Alexander system. If not, unquestionably the premise to make “best use of self” is. This goal is essential for the most successful fulfillment of our physical and musical aspirations.

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Medium 9781574413069

Chapter 7: Remembering Bill

Brian A. Shook University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter seven

R emembering Bill

F

Philip Varriale’s Eulogy

On September 19, 2005, the music world lost one of its most dedicated students, teachers, and performers: William Vacchiano. After a long battle with various physical ailments, Vacchiano passed away at Cabrini

Medical Center in Manhattan from respiratory failure. Philip Varriale,

MD, honored Vacchiano’s life with this eulogy delivered on September

24, 2005:

On a crisp, sunny autumn day in 1982, I took myself from my home in Westchester and drove to the residence of William Vacchiano. I had never met Mr. Vacchiano, but I had heard a great deal about him as the trumpet icon of the New York Philharmonic and his reputation as a legendary teacher of his time.

I had been sufficiently busy in medical practice as a cardiologist, but my intent was to resurrect my passion to play trumpet after a hiatus of nearly twenty-five years. On arrival, I strolled a short walkway bringing me to the door of a solidly built, two-story brick house in an attractive and well-preserved suburban neighborhood of Queens, New York.

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15. Exercises Starting on G

Stanley Ritchie Indiana University Press ePub

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Three Different Fingerings

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Major

Melodic Minor

Harmonic Minor

Minor

Major

Diminished seventh (flats)

Diminished seventh (flats and sharps)

Dominant seventh

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Medium 9780253344892

Epilogue: Village Exhumed

Timothy J. Cooley Indiana University Press ePub

Refrain:

Refrain:

Hej, co inom śtyraj dona

Hej, co inom śtyraj dona [vocables]

Co tam panie w

So there, sir, what’s up in

Zakopanen?

Zakopane?

Gąsienica, Bachleda

Gąsienica, Bachleda

Siecka, Obrochta

Siecka, Obrochta

Tatar, Marduła

Tatar, Marduła

Mateja, Sabała

Mateja, Sabała

Staszic, Goszczyński

Staszic, Goszczyński

Pol, Chałubiński

Pol, Chałubiński

Stolarczyk, Witkiewicz

Stolarczyk, Witkiewicz

Dembowski, Sienkiewicz

Dembowski, Sienkiewicz

Refrain:

Refrain

Giewonty, Sobczaki

Giewonty, Sobczaki

Stasecki, Walcoki

Stasecki, Walcoki

Wale, Roje, Brzegi

Wale, Roje, Brzegi

Krzeptowscy, Wójcioki

Krzeptowscy, Wójcioki

Anczyc, Zamoyski

Anczyc, Zamoyski

Gerson, Szymanowski

Gerson, Szymanowski

Eliasz, Modrzejewska

Eliasz, Modrzejewska

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Medium 9781574412734

Chapter 15 • His Music III

Helene LaFaro-Fernandez University of North Texas Press PDF

• 

Chapter 15  •

His Music III

Phil Palombi

I remember the day that I bought the two Bill Evans albums

Waltz for Debby and Sunday at the Village Vanguard. It was the summer before I started college at Youngstown State University, and

I had just begun to play acoustic bass four months previously.

At the time I was an electric bassist still largely into playing and listening to rock music, but I was heavily drawn to extended improvisation, which was mostly lacking in pop music.

I was hanging out in Cleveland with a bass player from the college who was showing me the ropes.We dropped into the Record Exchange, where I met a senior from YSU who was sifting through the stacks of vinyl. As we spoke, I told him I was learning upright and I was hoping to learn more about jazz. He told me

“as a jazz bass player, these are two of the most important records that you need to own,” and pulled those two Bill Evans albums out of the stack. In retrospect, I find it funny that a proverbial

“piece of the puzzle” was dropped into place for me by a lead trumpet player.

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7 Challenging the Voice of God in World War II–Era Soviet Documentaries

Lilya Kaganovsky Indiana University Press ePub

Jeremy Hicks

IN 1943, A DOCUMENTARY of the battle of Moscow (Razgrom nemetskikh voisk pod Moskvoi) titled Moscow Strikes Back won the Soviet Union its first Oscar. This version of the film had discarded the original voice-over and added a new one, written by Albert Maltz and read by Edward G. Robinson. This was not an unusual practice, and it has been repeated many times since. Both during and since the war itself, Soviet World War II black-and-white newsreel images have been recycled to illustrate this or that television documentary about the conflict, stripped of the verbal context provided by the voice-over commentary that first accompanied them in the original films. In removing what are assumed to be pompous voice-of-God commentaries encumbered by encomiums to Stalin and the party, historical filmmakers imply that a new voice-over will provide more informative verbal interpretations than the original, with less distortion and to greater effect.

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Medium 9780253017550

5 California

Sylvia Angelique Alajaji Indiana University Press ePub

“I will never forget what he said. As we were dancing, my friend turned to me and with a smile on his face, he said, ‘This music. . . . It isn’t Armenian, but it kept us Armenian.’”1 Emphasizing that last part, she implored: “Please, write that down. Yes, it may not be Armenian, but it did—it kept us Armenian.” I looked up from my notes to make sure I had heard correctly. This was not the first time I was hearing such a sentiment, but the context and what was being referred to were quite different. I was in Fresno, California, speaking with John and Barbara Chookasian, two U.S.-born Armenians who, as professional musicians, had made it their mission to bridge the divide between eastern (that is, Armenia-born) and western Armenians by bringing together the musical traditions of both. Barbara was recounting a recent wedding reception she had attended, where the kef-time music being performed inspired in the attendees both joy and nostalgia. With tears in her eyes, Barbara continued: “And, you know, he was right. He was right. Yes, maybe some will say that this music isn’t ‘Armenian,’ but it’s ours. It was our parents’ music, our grandparents’ music. It connects us to them. It connects us to each other. Really, you must write this down.”

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Medium 9781574412499

Scoring a Role

Edward D. Latham University of North Texas Press PDF

Dramatic Closure

Prepares, Stanislavsky stressed the importance of emotion memory, and it was this version of the system that was eventually adopted and promulgated by many of Stanislavsky’s American disciples.35 Near the end of his life, however, Stanislavsky developed a new method of working on a play, which he dubbed the “method of physical actions,” and it was this method that was to become what he felt was his most important contribution to acting theory.36

Scoring a Role

In its entirety, the Stanislavsky system represents an attempt to address every aspect of the actor’s craft. Much of the system, which is presented in three volumes (An Actor Prepares, Building a Character, and Creating a Role), focuses on practical matters of stage acting such as movement, relaxation, and vocal projection. The portion of the complete system that is relevant to the present undertaking, however (i.e., the portion that relates to the analysis of a dramatic text), is the subsection of Figure 2 listed under

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