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8 Recreation

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter eight

recreation

T

DCJ considers anything an inmate does out of his cell to be recreation, unless it is chow or part of his officially assigned duties. The official terms for recreation are either “programmatic activities,” which includes all officially sanctioned group meetings, and “non-programmatic activities,” which is essentially everything else.

Inmates spend most of their time at work, in their cells or socializing in the dayrooms or on the yard. Dayrooms are communal living areas.

On most units, they open at 8 A.M. and close at 10:30 P.M. on weekdays and at 1 A.M. on weekends and holidays. They are open all day and are usually noisy and full of inmates. Most dayrooms have from four to ten tables, which seat four; from one bench to four, which seat from five to ten inmates; and have one or two televisions. Depending on the warden’s preferences, programs offered on television will range from the basic four networks to ESPN, USA, and various movie channels.

The newer, pod units have larger dayrooms and fewer people per pod, so they usually have only one television. As a result, to allow inmates a choice—and to prevent fights over one group controlling the viewing— prison officials may allow inmates to go from pod to pod on minimumsecurity wings. When this is the case, one dayroom will be designated a

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10. What differentiates orbit shifters?

Steve Bax Kogan Page ePub

10

What differentiates orbit shifters?

Orbit-shifting innovation cannot be managed, it can only be unleashed. And this is not a one-off effort; rather it will have to be done at each threshold of the orbit-shift mountain. The energy and the focus required to navigate the orbit-shifting journey from one threshold to the next have to be replenished. Resolves have to be re-strengthened and commitments re-sought. Without this, the default setting of orbit-maintenance is likely to take over and drag the orbit-shifting journey down into just another orbit-maintaining activity.

What gives orbit shifters the capacity to scale the five thresholds, to confront gravity and new unknowns at every threshold, and restart again and again without feeling de-motivated? And whats more, not just to do it once but to be willing to take on new orbit-shifting challenges again and again.

To start zero-based at every threshold! To do this again and again requires more than tools and process templates. It requires fundamentally different mindsets.

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5.1 Introduction

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 5

A case study of ISO 9000 in large scale projects

5.1 Introduction

Although quality management systems were introduced more than a decade ago in the construction industries of the developed countries (in the United Kingdom, for example), the implementation of quality management systems in some less developed countries is still a relatively new phenomenon.

While quality management systems are now slowly making their presence felt in the less developed countries, there has been a lack of study of the problems faced by practitioners in implementing quality management systems for building projects during their infancy stage in the industry. This vacuum was, likewise, felt in the more developed countries like the United Kingdom when quality management systems were first introduced to their construction industries. This lacuna at the infancy stage means that the lessons and experiences learnt from implementing quality management systems in one particular building project are not necessarily transferred to benefit other projects. Apart from filling this vacuum, the aims of this chapter are to:

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1 Diagnostic

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter One

diagnostic

S

ince October 1, 1849, when a horse thief became the first person to be held in the state’s custody instead of by local law enforcement, Huntsville has been synonymous with Texas prisons. The beautiful town of

Huntsville—nestled in the midst of the state’s most lovely forests; four votes from being state capital instead of Austin; adopted home of General Sam Houston—is, nonetheless, by virtue of that first prison, fated to always be linked with prisons in the minds of Texans. That unit, built in what would soon be downtown Huntsville and known as the Walls, also soon included the growing system’s administrative offices. Over a century later, as the system began to expand rapidly, it became obvious that a separate unit was needed as a processing center. The Diagnostic Unit, built in 1964 a few thousand yards from the original Walls, became that intake unit. While there are now other units that may also serve some of the functions as the Diagnostic Unit, (now called the Byrd Unit), it was the first, it remains the most thorough, and it is the one I will use as a model.

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8.6 TQM for construction projects

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 8

Total Quality Management

8.1 Introduction

While quality management systems will help to promote good quality construction, it should be realised that the building industry is, however, frequently characterised by diverse professionals as well as a heavy dependence on foreign labour in some countries. This diversity and reliance can lead to cultural, social as well as professional stratification. Hence, to achieve quality construction, there is a need for all parties involved in the building process to cultivate a teamwork mindset. Unfortunately, such a mindset appears to be still lacking in today’s construction industry. It follows from such a situation that a more rational management approach for the construction process needs to be identified. The existing system of project implementation frequently leads to conflicts among the parties involved in the building process, hence rendering the system devoid of effective communication and teamwork. As construction projects become more varied and complex in nature, a fresh management paradigm seems imperative. In this context, a shift from the profession based scenario to a project-oriented team based scenario may be envisaged. The various disciplines should function within such a team culture, guided by policies, procedures and systems whilst focusing on the objectives and benefits identified for the project from the outset.

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Chapter 1: The Three Families

Bill Neal University of North Texas Press PDF

1

CHAPTER

The Three Families

Settling in Antebellum Texas

BY HAPPENSTANCE, the Sneed, Boyce, and Snyder families all

settled in the same place, a wild and sparsely populated area a few miles north of Austin around the central Texas village of Georgetown. The three families were bedrock Texans, all arriving before the Civil War—some even before statehood in 1845. During those early years, the families shared the same struggles and hardships in that harsh, dangerous, and unforgiving frontier where there was the constant threat of Indian depredations. They also shared many of the same qualities. They were intelligent people and reasonably well educated for that day: ambitious, bold-spirited, hardy, independent, and, most of all, determined—determined not only to survive, but also to prosper. They were a religious people, devout Methodists. All three families, years later, joined to help found Southwestern University in Georgetown, a Methodist-sponsored college that received its official charter in 1875. Over the years, the lives and destinies of the three families became intertwined.

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14 Craft Shop

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter fourteen

craft shop

T

here are perhaps only three ways an inmate may legally make money while he is in TDCJ. One is to write and then market his fiction, essays and poetry to free-world magazines. Another is to paint or draw and sell his artwork to interested buyers outside the walls. Both of these moneymaking ideas are subject to not just individual talent but to the mails, and to the hit-and-miss assistance of outside parties.

TDCJ offers one way for inmates who keep clear disciplinary records to make money while inside the walls, with all work and most sales being done by the inmates. It’s called the craft shop, or the “piddling” shop, and it is a privilege not to be dismissed lightly. The craft shop is just that: an area where inmates work on leather goods, jewelry, wood projects, paintings, fanciful stick creations—any of a number of personal expressions that can be done at a minimum of cost and then sold to officers or visitors or marketed to the free-world.

Inmates within the shops, called piddlers, usually begin as apprentices, or helpers, and work their way up the ladder as space in the craft shop allows. A determined, hard-working piddler who produces quality goods can make over $12,000 a year while still performing his assigned duties for the system. That may not sound like much money, but it does

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Chapter 11: “No Trial for the Dead”

Bill Neal University of North Texas Press PDF

11

CHAPTER

“No Trial for the Dead”

The Vernon Murder Trial of John Beal Sneed

The Scene: The district courtroom in Vernon, Texas, February 11, 1913.

The Billing: The State of Texas v. John Beal Sneed, a murder trial.1

That billing, however, was somewhat misleading. What the packed courtroom witnessed when the curtain parted was less of a solemn, dignified, dispassionate judicial pursuit of truth and justice than . . . well, what would you call it? Part tragedy, part comedy, part farce, part melodrama, part pathos, part bare-knuckle brawl?

Whatever you called it, it was well larded with generous helpings of hyperbole, nonsense, and old-fashioned tent-revival-style hallelujahs and hellfire damnations.

The judicial cast for both sides was the same as it had been during the Beech Epting trial except the prosecution added Vernon lawyer Cecil Story to its roster while the defense added Vernon lawyer Harry Mason. Judge James Nabers again presided.

Jury selection proved both entertaining and revealing. Each prospect was tested on his views on the unwritten law. Several candidly admitted that they believed the unwritten law was higher than

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5.8 Consultants’ site staff

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 5

A case study of ISO 9000 in large scale projects

5.1 Introduction

Although quality management systems were introduced more than a decade ago in the construction industries of the developed countries (in the United Kingdom, for example), the implementation of quality management systems in some less developed countries is still a relatively new phenomenon.

While quality management systems are now slowly making their presence felt in the less developed countries, there has been a lack of study of the problems faced by practitioners in implementing quality management systems for building projects during their infancy stage in the industry. This vacuum was, likewise, felt in the more developed countries like the United Kingdom when quality management systems were first introduced to their construction industries. This lacuna at the infancy stage means that the lessons and experiences learnt from implementing quality management systems in one particular building project are not necessarily transferred to benefit other projects. Apart from filling this vacuum, the aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9780856832888

Part 2: Shifting The Paradigm

Polly Higgins Shepheard-Walwyn ePub

ECOCIDE straddles both types of nuisance – public and private. The wording of the definition of ecocide is deliberate. It is designed to incorporate both civil and criminal legislation that will grow out of the definition. Prosecution for the crime of ecocide brings with it civil litigation as well. Restoration of damage, destruction or loss of ecosystems will be a key aspect to be determined in the light of convictions being made. National legislation premised on the ability of a person or group of persons to bring a claim in negligence, against a corporate entity whose directors have been found guilty of ecocide can be determined speedily and at limited cost. In such circumstances instead of the claimant having to prove his case, the conviction of the CEO and/or his directors will take the case straight to the issue of damages and compensation to be payable by the company. Thus, a CEO can be imprisoned for ecocide activities (and restoration of damage ordered as part of the sentencing requirements), plus the inhabitants of the territory could take individual or class action against the company for compensation.

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Medium 9781574411829

3. Intensive Supervision Programs

Gail Caputo University of North Texas Press PDF

CHAPTER 3

Intensive Supervision Programs

BACKGROUND

Intensive Supervision Programs, the most popular intermediate sanctions in the United States, provide for closer monitoring and surveillance of offenders than is possible with regular probation and parole. An intensive supervision program (ISP) is a more enhanced and restrictive form of probation or parole intended to protect the public.

Probation departments experimented with intensive forms of probation as early as the 1950s. These early programs emphasized low caseloads to afford probation officers better control of offenders under supervision. In the late 1970s there were as many as 46 ISPs. These programs were used for offenders on probation and provided for smaller caseloads and increased officer-offender contacts (Byrne, Lurigio, &

Baird, 1989).

It was not until the mid-1980s, however, that intensive supervision programs emerged in their present forms. Like other intermediate sanctions, intensive supervision programs were created to reduce reliance on prisons and to fill the gap between traditional probation and incarceration by serving as tougher punishments with stricter controls over offenders than traditional probation could provide. The impetus behind this new generation of programs was to alleviate crowding in prisons, to more effectively supervise higher-risk offenders on probation, to save money, and to control crime (See Petersilia, 1999; Haas & Latessa,

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Appendix Two: Timeline

Bill Neal University of North Texas Press PDF

APPENDIX TWO

Timeline

1839

“Parson” Joseph Perkins Sneed, Tennessee circuit-riding

Methodist preacher, migrates to Texas and settles in Central

Texas area north of Austin.

1839

Tennessee native James Boyce migrates to Texas and settles in the same Central Texas area.

May 8, 1842

Albert Gallatin Boyce, son of James Boyce, is born near Austin.

1854

Dudley H. Snyder, Mississippi native, migrates to Texas at the age of twenty-one and settles a short distance north of

Austin.

1856

John Wesley Snyder, younger brother of Dudley H. Snyder, migrates to Texas, soon followed by a third Snyder brother,

Thomas Shelton Snyder. All settle in the same Central

Texas area.

July 24, 1875

Al Boyce, Jr., son of Colonel Albert G. Boyce and wife, Annie

Boyce, is born.

Dec. 30, 1877

John Beal Sneed, son of Joseph Tyre Sneed and wife,

Lillian Beal Sneed, and grandson of Joseph Perkins Sneed, the Methodist parson, is born.

Aug. 15, 1879

Lenora (Lena) Snyder, daughter of Thomas Shelton Snyder, is born.

Mid-1880s

Famous three-million-acre XIT Ranch carved out of Texas

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Medium 9780253014825

3 Muslim Jews and Jewish Muslims

Wagner, Mark S. Indiana University Press PDF

Muslim Jews and Jewish Muslims

The shar‘a imposed explicit handicaps upon non-Muslim litigants. Since the system was hierarchical in nature, those suppositions did not require justification. Nonlegal codes that were operative in the context of social relations also pointed to a person’s Muslimness or Jewishness. These were no less relevant to participants in legal proceedings than those described (or legislated) by substantive law.

A stipulation of the sumptuary laws asks that non-Muslims pray quietly.

In practice this specific use of the human voice had a more general application as well; thus, Jews were expected to keep their voices down in the presence of

Muslims.¹ They were also expected to be obsequious to Muslims. “Despite their learning and good breeding,” Mordecai Yitshari writes of the Jewish male elite of Sanaa who were hauled into jail on trumped-up charges, “they were very cowardly.”² A Muslim saying reflects Jews’ perceived reluctance to get involved in intra-Muslim disputes due to their weakness: “Even if you have a hundred Jews

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Appendix E Recreation Requirements

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix E

Recreation Requirements

Following are the minimum hours of recreation to be given each inmate, as agreed to under Ruiz. Units may offer more but not less. For these purposes, dayroom time is counted as recreation (rec) time. (In mid2001, staffing shortages were serving as an excuse for certain units to begin scaling back these requirements.)

G1, G2, and G3 Minimum—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Seven hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 4 Medium—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Five hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 5 Close—Two hours daily, outside rec only

Administrative segregation:

Level I—One hour out-of-cell rec each day, with at least two hours weekly outside; Or two hours out-of-cell rec five days per week, with two hour weekly outside; Or three hours out-of-cell four days per week, with three hours weekly outside. (The Level I schedule will be decided upon by the warden or his/her designee.)

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Medium 9781457109737

Chapter 5 General Civil Regulatory Jurisdiction

General, Conference of Western Attorneys University Press of Colorado ePub

P.180, n.89.      Add the following to the end of the footnote:

Another commentator, however, has suggested that “Congress should carefully deliberate” over proposed legislation that would extend tribal criminal jurisdiction to non-Indians and cited Justice Kennedy’s concurrence insofar as it stressed the importance of the “federal structure.” Patience Drake Roggensack, Plains Commerce Bank’s Potential Collision with the Expansion of Tribal Court Jurisdiction by Senate Bill 3320, 38 U. Balt. L. Rev. 29, 41 (2008); see also Ann E. Tweedy, Connecting the Dots Between the Constitution, the Marshall Trilogy, and United States v. Lara: Notes Toward a Blueprint for the Next Legislative Restoration of Tribal Sovereignty, 42 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 651, 700 (2009) (although questioning analytical legitimacy of Justice Kennedy’s concerns, concluding that “his opinion unequivocally suggests that to decrease its vulnerability, any restoration statute should, to the extent possible, provide for protection of individual constitutional rights”).

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