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Appendix G – Parole Officials/Offices

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

APPENDIX G

Parole Officials

There are two distinct entities that concern themselves with parole in Texas—the Parole Division of the TDCJ and the Board of Pardons and Paroles. The first agency actually oversees inmates who have been released. Ex-cons report to them, and it is their staffers who visit homes and ensure that the provisions of parole (set by the Board) are actually met. The second is an independent agency whose primary role is the discretionary release of inmates from prison, along with revocation of released prisoners.

You may reach the Parole Division at:

TDCJ-ID Parole Division

8610 Shoal Creek Blvd.

P.O. Box 13401, Capitol Station

Austin, TX 78711

(512) 406-5200

FAX (512) 406-5858

The members of the Board of Pardons and Paroles are appointed by the governor to six-year terms, which are staggered so all do not expire at the same time. You may write or call the Board members, or the chairman, at the following addresses:

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Medium 9780870819506

10. Water Entities

P. Andrew Jones University Press of Colorado ePub

Corporate water entities have always played an important role in Colorado in organizing and constructing diversion works and delivering water. Although their social organization has been lost to time, archaeological records clearly reflect the Anasazis’ corporate efforts to construct and maintain common diversion and storage works at Mummy Lake. Working together, these industrious people constructed miles of ditches and the state’s first water supply reservoir for communities nestled in the hills and arroyos of what would become Colorado’s southwestern corner.

The Spanish style of irrigation in New Mexico profoundly affected water development and administration in Colorado. Community ditches, called acequias, were utilized to divert river water to dry lands by means of gravity. The community of Santa Fe was founded in 1609. Over the next century, an estimated sixty acequias came into operation in New Mexico. During the 1700s an additional 100 acequias were established, followed by another 300 in the 1800s.1 The acequias influenced development of ditch and reservoir companies in Colorado.

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Medium 9781574411522

Appendix D Commissary Spending Limits

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781902375014

7.2 ISO 9000 and quality costs

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9781902375014

7.6 Need for a quality cost system

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9781623491376

1. The Unique Characteristics of Water and Water Rights in Texas

Porter, Charles R. Texas A&M University Press ePub

THE UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS OF WATER AND WATER RIGHTS IN TEXAS

Determining a water right in Texas depends on which of three geological containers holds the water.1 The first container is surface water, or water that flows on the surface of the ground in a watercourse.2 The State of Texas owns the water in a watercourse. The assessment of what makes up a watercourse can be complicated, so the safest way to look at ownership of surface water is to consider all water flowing in any stream or area with bed and banks to be surface water. Surface water is not yours to own but, except in unique situations, is owned by the State of Texas. Knowing this may save you many dollars in fines and hours of angst. If you have a question about surface water ownership on real property you own or are considering purchasing, ask the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) for a determination.

The second geological container is known as diffused surface water, or rainwater that runs off your roof or over the surface of your land without flowing in a stream or channel. The water in this container is owned by the landowner.

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2 Living Quarters

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Chapter two

living quarters

I

n prison, privacy is precious. Inmates need some place to brood, to read and write letters, to kneel and pray. There is no place to be by oneself, except for rare instances. What little privacy inmates have is in their living quarters.

Depending on the age of a particular unit and on an inmate’s custody level, he will live in one of three fashions: single-celled, in administrative segregation; double-celled, in all close, most medium, and some minimum assignments; or in a dormitory, which is only for minimum-security inmates. While many inmates would prefer cells, ironically only close-custody inmates—who have few privileges to speak of—are guaranteed cells.

At the time Ruiz v. Estelle was heard, TDCJ consisted of eighteen units—sixteen for males and two for females. Their design was primarily the same—one long corridor, intersected at intervals by housing blocks that extended, wing-like, to both sides. Imagine a cross with eight arms instead of two and you have the idea. Each block contained from two to four tiers, with twenty-one to thirty-one cells per tier. Designed for one inmate, there were never less than two inmates assigned to each cell, and severe overcrowding—a main issue in Ruiz—resulted in three or sometimes four inmates living in a forty-five-foot space.

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Medium 9780253001924

2 The Constitutional Foundations of the “Preclearance” Process: How Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act Was Enforced, 1965–2005

Edited by Daniel McCool Indiana University Press ePub

In July 2006, Congress adopted a revision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that reauthorized the “preclearance” requirements set forth in Section 5 for another twenty-five years and amended the legal standards to be applied in its enforcement, restoring the standards for assessing the purpose and effect of voting changes that had been altered by two recent Supreme Court decisions.1 Section 5 is often regarded as one of the act’s two most powerful provisions.2 In the preclearance process jurisdictions covered by Section 5, for the most part states of the former Confederacy, must obtain federal approval of voting changes, either from a three-judge panel in the District of Columbia or from the Department of Justice, before these changes become legally enforceable. Approval requires proof by the jurisdiction that the change “does not have the purpose and will not have the effect of denying or abridging the right to vote on account of race or color.”3 Shortly after its adoption the Supreme Court ruled that Section 5, like the rest of the act, was constitutional. “Congress concluded that the unsuccessful remedies which it had prescribed in the past would have to be replaced by sterner and more elaborate measures,” wrote Chief Justice Earl Warren.4 Twice since then the Court has upheld the constitutionality of Section 5, as amended.5

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Medium 9781902375014

2.1 Introduction

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 2

Behavioural influence of ISO 9000

2.1 Introduction

The ISO 9000 standard is a quality management system which involves every employee within an organisation, both directly and indirectly. As a management system, it requires discipline within an organisation to ensure that procedures are followed closely by all employees. Unless everyone contributes with the right attitude, the system will not function properly. While documentation is the key to implementation, top management’s commitment, the generous provision of resources and a positive attitude towards ISO 9000 are important attributes which underpin quality management systems. Quality management systems do not function effectively without the support of senior management.

In reality, however, things are not always smooth going. It is human nature to resist change, even for the better. Apart from employees’ reluctance to follow a set of rigid procedures, they may also perceive it as pointless to document procedures for activities which they have been doing every day for many years. The failure of management in securing co-operation and co-ordination adds to difficulties in implementing quality systems. Furthermore, organisation politics is another reality which should not be ignored for managing quality systems effectively. While the technical requirements of ISO 9000 are important, studies have suggested that other non-technical, irrational and socio-political factors may have an equally adverse influence on quality management systems (Seymour and Low, 1990; Low, 1989, 1993).

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Medium 9781574411522

Appendix E Recreation Requirements

Jorge Antonio Renaud University of North Texas Press PDF

Appendix E

Recreation Requirements

Following are the minimum hours of recreation to be given each inmate, as agreed to under Ruiz. Units may offer more but not less. For these purposes, dayroom time is counted as recreation (rec) time. (In mid2001, staffing shortages were serving as an excuse for certain units to begin scaling back these requirements.)

G1, G2, and G3 Minimum—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Seven hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 4 Medium—Four hours weekday, one of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard. Five hours weekend, two of which must be in a gym or outside rec yard

G 5 Close—Two hours daily, outside rec only

Administrative segregation:

Level I—One hour out-of-cell rec each day, with at least two hours weekly outside; Or two hours out-of-cell rec five days per week, with two hour weekly outside; Or three hours out-of-cell four days per week, with three hours weekly outside. (The Level I schedule will be decided upon by the warden or his/her designee.)

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Medium 9781626562691

9 The Peace Room

Schenwar, Maya Berrett-Koehler Publishers ePub

When we think about the prison abolitionist movement ... it’s not “Tear down all prison walls tomorrow,” it’s “crowd out prisons” with other things that work effectively and bring communities together rather than destroying them.

—Andrea Smith, INCITE!: Women of Color Against Violence 1

As spring exhales its way into summer, I pay a visit to Manley High School in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood. In 2007, Manley logged the most “violent incidents” of any high school in the city—though of course such rankings will always be subjective, depending on which incidents are reported, which are dubbed violent, and who’s counting.2 Largely attended by black and Latino students, it’s prime ground for the school-to-prison pipeline, in which school-based arrests pave a quick path to early incarceration. Research by Project NIA found that about one out of five juvenile arrests in Chicago in 2010 took place at a school. Seventy-five percent of those arrested were black youth, even though black kids make up only 42 percent of the Chicago school system.3

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Medium 9781457109737

Chapter 13 Indian Child Welfare Act

General, Conference of Western Attorneys University Press of Colorado ePub

P.572, n.12.      Add the following to line 6 of the footnote after “see”:

In re A.A., 84 Cal. Rptr. 3d 841 (Ct. App. 2008) (discussing various issues with reference to both ICWA and complementary state Indian child-related custody proceeding provisions, including adequate efforts to provide remedial services, the “Indian child exception” established under California statute, and child placement);

P.573, n.14.      Add the following to line 1 of the footnote after “see”:

In re C.C.M., 202 P.3d 971, 976–77 (Wash. Ct. App. 2009) (custody proceeding brought by Indian custodian and his spouse constituted a foster care proceeding since purpose was “to divest [the father] of his legal right to custody”); In re N.B., 199 P.3d 16, 18–19 (Colo. Ct. App. 2007) (citing to, and agreeing with, decisions from other jurisdictions that deem step-parent adoptions “where a child will remain with one biological parent after the adoption” subject to ICWA);

P.574, n.18.      Add the following to line 1 of the footnote after “See”:

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Chapter 19 – Drugs

Jorge Antonio Renaud The University of North Texas Press ePub

CHAPTER NINETEEN

drugs

In March of 1995, TDCJ outlawed the use of tobacco products on all of its units, by both guards and inmates. Trumpeted as a cost-saving measure, the move probably did save the system millions of dollars. Building interiors no longer needed the constant repainting due to layers of smoke scum. The damage done by incidental, and sometimes intentional, fires was eliminated. Convicts suffering from asthma, emphysema, and other lung ailments could literally breathe easier, and convicts’ health improved overall, dropping the system’s medical cost.

One totally unintended consequence of the new tobacco policy was a sharp decline in drug trafficking, as the convicts who sold drugs—and the guards who smuggled them—realized the enormous profits and relatively low risks of now trafficking tobacco. While drugs are still available—especially on the units where older convicts retain their lifelong addiction to heroin—the businessmen who maintained the large operations now deal tobacco, not cocaine or marijuana.

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7.12 Conclusion

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 7

A system for quantifying construction quality costs

7.1 Introduction

There are three components that make up quality costs: Prevention, Appraisal and Failure costs. The ISO 9000 standard introduces a quality management system that has been widely claimed would reduce the costs of business. One of the ways it does this is through a reduction in quality costs. The ISO 9000 quality management system establishes work procedures that reduce defects. Proper design and implementation of these work procedures lead to reduced wastage as more work would be done right the first time. Ultimately, the costs of operation would decrease. However, no study has been done based on the above premise. Although it has been widely claimed that ISO 9000 would reduce the costs of doing business, no studies have been undertaken within the context of ISO 9000 certified construction firms. Due to this vacuum, this chapter proposes a cost system to capture site quality costs. The aims of this chapter are to:

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Medium 9781902375014

8.4 Implementing TQM using the ISO 9000 route

Low Sui Pheng Chartridge Books Oxford ePub

CHAPTER 8

Total Quality Management

8.1 Introduction

While quality management systems will help to promote good quality construction, it should be realised that the building industry is, however, frequently characterised by diverse professionals as well as a heavy dependence on foreign labour in some countries. This diversity and reliance can lead to cultural, social as well as professional stratification. Hence, to achieve quality construction, there is a need for all parties involved in the building process to cultivate a teamwork mindset. Unfortunately, such a mindset appears to be still lacking in today’s construction industry. It follows from such a situation that a more rational management approach for the construction process needs to be identified. The existing system of project implementation frequently leads to conflicts among the parties involved in the building process, hence rendering the system devoid of effective communication and teamwork. As construction projects become more varied and complex in nature, a fresh management paradigm seems imperative. In this context, a shift from the profession based scenario to a project-oriented team based scenario may be envisaged. The various disciplines should function within such a team culture, guided by policies, procedures and systems whilst focusing on the objectives and benefits identified for the project from the outset.

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