397 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9780874215755

Box-Logic

Anne Wysocki Utah State University Press ePub

Geoffrey Sirc

Let me confess: it has been a frustrating last several years for me in my writing courses. The rapid advance of technology has meant a pedagogical dilemma for me: just what do I do in the classroom, what do I teach? Gail Hawisher and Cindy Selfe have written recently about this struggle, noting “the increasing change [in compositional media] and the increasing alienation that scholars are beginning to recognize as an outgrowth of such instability” (190). Is the essay still our central genre? Do our students do Web sites? Do we teach html? Email as a genre? Where do we go?

Well, where I wanted to go, what made the most sense to me personally, was Marcel Duchamp. Specifically, Duchamp’s Green Box (1934), the collection of personal notes (reproduced above) he made to himself while working on his Large Glass.

Here’s the more conventional textual form of the work, as published in Duchamp’s selected writings:

It’s the idea of the prose catalogue.

Text as a collection of interesting, powerful statements.

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Medium 9781442271197

Chemical Analysis of the Dust on a Historically Important Collection The W. B. Carpenter Eozoon Collection at the Natural History Museum, London

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Maria Consuelo Sendino

Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK; c.sendino-lara@nhm.ac.uk

Javier Cuadros

Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK; J.Cuadros@nhm.ac.uk

Lu Allington-Jones

Core Research Laboratories, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK; l.allington-jones@nhm.ac.uk

Jane A. Barnbrook

Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK; J.Barnbrook@nhm.ac.uk

Abstract The Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, houses an important historical collection: the W. B. Carpenter collection of Eozoon, which is of great significance in the history of science, specifically with regard to a nineteenth-century controversy about the presence of fossils in rock of Precambrian age. After providing a history of the Eozoon Collection, we then give an overview of its care and cu-ration up to the present before describing new research on the history of the specimens and the origin of the thick black dust which covers them. Chemical and morphological analysis of the dust using SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) allows identification of one silicate and one sulphur-calcium phase. The silicate may derive from the Eozoon specimens themselves, whereas the sulphur-calcium phase may indicate gypsum from plaster. It is possible that the gypsum dust may have come from collapse of the ceiling during the fire in November 1885 at Carpenter’s home that led to his death.

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Medium 9781936757114

Appendix 4: Discarded/modified Metadata Elements

Brian O'Leary Book Industry Study Group ePub
Medium 9781908372307

Introduction

Dee Clayton M-Y Books Ltd ePub

If you have a fear of public speaking or are nervous giving presentations I want you to know its not your fault... Its the fault of your Public Speaking Monkeys or, in the visual shorthand I often use to refer to them in this book:

@(O_O)@

These little fellas are a little bit like wild animals running loose inside your mind. Theyre often out of control and therefore cause you problems. Theyre the voices in our heads; the ones responsible for last-minute presentation nerves, acute anxiety and the fear of public speaking. You know the ones dont you? They whisper or perhaps even roar discouraging and often negative remarks; the voices say familiar things like:

Doubt

More often than not the monkey voices are negative internal voices that put doubt in your mind about your presenting abilities. Perhaps you find the anxiety sometimes stops you even trying to get up to speak so you miss opportunities. The result could be a missed promotion, a lost sale or just that frustrating feeling of not getting your views heard.

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Medium 9781574411713

1: Conclusion

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

18

CONTESTED POLICY

was no mandate, few school districts, as advocates found out later, took advantage of this bill during the first several years of its implementation.

“Bilingual education,” noted John C. Molina, the first Mexican-American director of the national Office of Bilingual Education, “was too new and philosophically threatening to be accepted by many school districts which often favored remedial and English language programs instead.”40

Third, the program was categorical in nature and compensatory in intent. Categorical funds were provided by the federal government to local educational agencies to support services of a particular type or for a particular category of students. Under this new bill, funds were to be used to develop compensatory educational programs for those students who were limited in their ability to speak English and who came from low-income homes, i.e., those who were economically and “linguistically handicapped.”

Fourth, it was “open-ended”: it did not legally require or prescribe a particular curriculum nor insist on particular bilingual instructional techniques. Congress, in keeping with tradition, did not specify any one single approach to instructing English language learners. A variety of educational programs in addition to bilingual ones were eligible for funding under the new bill.41

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Medium 9781935249801

Chapter 5: Sharing Information: The World Is Your Audience

Nancy Frey Solution Tree Press ePub

One of the milestones in our transition to literacy 2.0 teaching came several years ago when a student asked if she could write her book review on Amazon.com rather than on paper. Amber, who had read Who Will Tell My Brother? (Carvell, 2002), wanted to share her thoughts about the book with other people who had read it. She really enjoyed the poetic format of the book and at the same time was angry about the mascot issue raised in the story. She wanted to know if this kind of thing happened in other places or if it was “just fiction.” She wanted to connect with other readers, and she understood that this relatively new service would allow her to do so. As she said, “Nobody else in class has read it, but somebody out there has, and I wanna talk with them.” Despite our concerns about this new venue, we encouraged her to post a comment about the book and promised that we would read her comment and discuss it with her. Were we scared to let her share her developing voice with the whole world? Yes. Did we understand her desire to do so? Of course. And did we learn something along the way? You bet.

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Medium 9780870819018

20. Numbers, Counting, Times, and Dates

Andrew Cowell University Press of Colorado ePub

The grammar of numbers, times, and dates is quite complex in Arapaho because except in the case of simple counting, number roots occur in verbal forms. There are numerous derivational suffixes used with number roots to form verbs indicating quantity, ordinal numbers, clock time, and so forth. Although some are familiar primary derivational forms, others are unique to the number verbs.

The simple count numbers are:

The numbers show clear traces of a quinary counting system, and this is reinforced by the fact that /niit/ is a common root for ‘one’ in the language (/niiteiyookuu/ ‘to stand in line, to stand one-by-one’, nííto’ ‘first’)

The teens series is formed by the addition of the II derivational final /iini/ to the number roots, thus forming verbs—but often without initial change. Formerly, the count form for ‘ten’ was added prior to this, and some people still do this today:

The succeeding decades are formed by adding the II derivational final /yoo/ to the count number roots. Once again, verbs are thus formed—but again without initial change for most speakers. The intervening numbers are formed in the same way as the teens:

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Medium 9781442267930

Sovereignty, Repatriation, and the Archival Imagination

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Indigenous Curation and Display Practices

Kimberly Christen Withey

Associate Professor and Director Digital Technology and Culture Program; Director of Digital Projects, Plateau Center, Native American Programs, Washington State University, Pullman, WA; kachristen@wsu.edu

Abstract    Sovereignty is an often invoked, yet notoriously misunderstood and misused term in relation to the political, territorial, cultural and economic needs, aspirations, and goals of Indigenous peoples living in post-colonial settler states. Archives were established as places where official records became anchors for nations in the making as they documented the accepted demise of their first peoples. As a result, the archival imagination is both a process of political work and ideological maneuvering. In the post-colonial imagination, archives have become hotbeds for revising the historical fictions and fantasies that allowed for the erasure and presumed demise of Indigenous peoples. As archives shift to include Indigenous voices, and as Indigenous archives assert their own prominence in the landscape, the archival imagination expands. This article analyzes the emergent archival imagination through the lens of sovereignty, repatriation movements, and digital technologies to expose the place of Indigenous rights, histories, and imaginations in the practical work of archives in post-colonial settler states. Using examples from my own collaborations in the United States and Canada with Indigenous communities and my work as the director of Mukurtu CMS, I examine how multiple stakeholders grapple with and infuse archival practices, tools, and work with the many nuances of sovereignty.

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Medium 9781442277229

The Museum of Conflict: An Alternative Model of Social Engagement

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub
Anushka RajendranSchool of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India, anushka.rjndrn@gmail.comAbstract Conflictorium: The Museum of Conflict was established in Mirzapur, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, in 2013, as a small community museum in the western part of India committed to its local context. The area has a history of ongoing communal tensions between the various communities that coexist within it, and the museum directly responds to the demands generated by this particularity. The exhibits at the museum consist of a collection of participative/immersive contexts that accumulate narratives of the experiences and memories of its visitors, thereby working through the trauma embedded in the everyday. By identifying as a museum, the space routes the validation that being part of a museum collection forges to acknowledge the legitimacy of the contemporary history of its community, thereby lending them a sense of belonging. This sensitivity to the audience that the museum addresses is particularly unique in India, where state-funded museums have historically had limited active engagement with their viewing publics. This article contextualizes the Conflictorium’s presence as an alternative museum model in the country’s social and political context as well as the existing network of public, private, and community museums. See All Chapters
Medium 9781908372307

Chapter 7 – Preparation, structure & practice

Dee Clayton M-Y Books Ltd ePub

Now weve taken a look at helpful mindsets, lets cover some tips and techniques for structuring your content and preparing and practicing for your presentation or talk. Lets face it most people have never learnt to do any of these things, so having a technique that you know works for each step will be more than helpful! There are many ways in which you can approach these things and I want to share some of the best and simplest ways Ive come across so far.

First lets look at the preparation side of the presentation an aspect thats often totally missed by some! Preparation is important and, no matter how time-pressured you are, a little preparation goes a long way. In here youll find some helpful tips on how to prepare thoroughly and also how to create a structure for your talk even if it is at the last-minute!

Consider your audience

One of the first things I ask my mentoring clients before they tell me all about their presentation is Whos in the audience? or Whos your ideal audience?. So many times I see people just open up their laptops and start to write a presentation before theyve considered the audience or the structure they need to follow. Many new clients I work with have forgotten that the audience is a key ingredient they used to be so worried about what their monkeys would say that they forgot to think about what the audience wants and needs.

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Medium 9781607320944

CHAPTER THREE. Deep History, Cultural Identities, and Ethnogenesis in the Southern Amazon

Alf Hornborg University Press of Colorado ePub

Michael Heckenberger

Ethnogenesis is a widely discussed aspect of cultural change in indigenous Amazonia, generally taken to mean the emergence of a discrete “ethnos” through the mixing of two or more distinctive cultural groups, particularly within the context of European colonialism (Hill 1996). However, little is known in most cases about the actual processes of change, particularly over the long term, including different perspectives on change and continuity operating at multiple scales. Processes of cultural transformation, including major changes within societies and across regional systems, as well as cultural pluralism, are particularly poorly understood for pre-Columbian periods. This is due to a lack of well-documented long-term trajectories of sociohistorical change in discrete regions, especially such that can be linked to specific ethnographic cultural groups.

This chapter discusses the southern Amazon periphery and, particularly, the upper Xingú region of the southern Amazon. The Xinguano regional culture has long been known as one of the best cases of ethnogenesis in Amazonia, since peer communities in this regional society speak diverse languages, including Arawak, Carib, and Tupían languages, yet share the same basic cultural pattern.1 Recent research demonstrates that, while post-contact changes, particularly during the period from 1700 to 1800, were critical in the genesis of the plural society known today (composed of Arawak, Tupí-Guaraní, or closely related Tupían- and Carib-speaking peoples), pluralism has been part and parcel of Xinguano society and culture throughout much of its long history. This culture history, which extends from before ca. AD 500–800 to present times, is discussed in relation to several major periods, each of which can be seen as representing different aspects of “ethnogenesis”: (1) the early emergence of settled, hierarchical, and regional social formations and the spread of these cultural features, related specifically to ancestors of Arawak and related ethnolinguistic groups, in the lowlands and, particularly, southern Amazon periphery; (2) colonization by early Arawak agriculturalists, ca. AD 500 to 800 or before; (3) development of the regional social formation, characterized by the integration of small territorial polities within a regional peer-polity, by ca. 1250; and (4) post-contact development of the multilingual Xinguano society documented ethnographically, particularly after 1650–1750.

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Medium 9780749461973

13. Leading

Comfort, Jeremy Kogan Page ePub

13

Leading

This chapter focuses on:

Managers and leaders managing and leading

Somebody once said that managers run the shop while leaders change it (or try to). Or to put it another way: managers produce order and stability in the present by handling processes and people; leaders bring about change for the future by influencing people and organizations.

These snapshots of managers and leaders show the influence of Kotters famous distinction between management and leadership, which is described in the exercise which follows.

Managing and leading

Are you more of a manager or more of a leader? Do you do more managing or more leading?

Looking at the full range of your activities at work, indicate the extent to which you do the things listed by circling the appropriate number (1 is to a small extent, 7 is to a large extent).

Managing for stability and consistency

Planning and budgeting:

allocate resources

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

establish agendas

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

set timetables

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Organizing and staffing:

provide structure

1

2

3

4

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Medium 9781574411713

4: Changes in Policy

Guadalupe San Miguel Jr. University of North Texas Press PDF

THE FINAL PUSH, 1990S

83

CHANGES IN POLICY

As in the prior decade, the opponents of bilingual education also sought legislative changes to this policy. Between 1995 and 2001, several pieces of legislation aimed at eliminating or modifying the federal bilingual education bill were introduced.

One of the most publicized efforts to eliminate bilingual education was submitted by House Majority Whip Tom DeLay, R-TX. In March and April of 1998 DeLay drafted and introduced legislation that would have removed the federal mandate on bilingual education by abolishing the Education Department’s Office of Bilingual Education and effectively ended federal involvement in this program. This legislation, English for Children Act, was modeled after the proposition to be voted upon by California voters in the general election in November of 1998. If enacted, it would have voided the consent decrees that encouraged the establishment of bilingual programs in return for federal funding. More specifically, it would have effectively ended federal funding for about 750 bilingual programs nationwide that allowed the teaching of immigrant children in their native language until they learned English. It also would have saved the government an estimated $215 million a year. Once these decrees were voided, state and local school officials would decide for themselves whether they wanted to continue funding bilingual education programs.23 LULAC as well as Gene Green and Sheila Jackson, both members of Congress from the Houston area, denounced DeLay’s bill.24

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Medium 9781538101391

From Bookshelves to the City Streets: Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

From Bookshelves to the City Streets

Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Christopher D. Cantwell

Assistant Professor of Public History and Religious Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, cantwellcd@umkc.edu

AbstractIn 2013 the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry Library in Chicago undertook an initiative to expand the use of its collection of church and synagogue records through a new digital project titled Faith in the City: Chicago’s Religious Diversity in the Era of the World’s Fair. Though recent scholarship in the study of religion has highlighted the importance of such documents in understanding the contours of American religious life, the collection’s origins as a genealogical resource have long shaped its use. By locating curated portions of the library’s church histories on a digital map of the city alongside nearly two dozen essays on Chicago’s religious history, Faith in the City aims to publicize the collection to new communities of users while also enhancing how local and family historians engage with the material. The following case study provides an overview of Faith in the City’s development, the interventions it hopes to make, as well as challenges the platform faced. It concludes by briefly considering the potential of map-based presentations of cultural heritage collections.

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Medium 9780856832710

Chapter 1 - Different premises on which language may be founded

Paul Douglas Shepheard-Walwyn ePub

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