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Medium 9781574415933

Transnationalizing Porter’s Germans in Stanley Kramer’s Ship of Fools (1965)

Edited by Thomas Austenfeld UNT Press ePub

Transnationalizing Porter’s Germans in Stanley Kramer’s Ship of Fools (1965)

Anne-Marie Scholz

In the mid-twentieth century and just prior to the onset of mass commercial air travel, the transatlantic voyage provided novelists and filmmakers with a potent metaphor to gauge the relationship between tourism, travel, and the meaning and significance of "transnational" forms of interaction and transformation. An intriguing example of such an effort is the Jewish-American filmmaker Stanley Kramer’s 1965 adaptation of Katherine Anne Porter’s 1962 novel Ship of Fools. In her novel, Porter transformed the medieval German satire Das Narrenschiff into a modern narrative about transatlantic travel. Her version tells the story of a group of German, Spanish, and American as well as Swiss, Cuban, and Mexican passengers en route on the passenger ship Vera from Veracruz, Mexico, to Bremerhaven, Germany. It is set in the historically significant period of the early 1930s, when the Nazis were first coming into power. This essay will evaluate the ways that the metaphor of transnational travel was used to examine the meanings of "Germanness" in this period. It will also consider how these American depictions were received by German reviewers and critics in both West and East Germany.1

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Medium 9781786390769

2: Implementing African National Climate Change Policies

Friis-Hansen, E. CABI PDF

2 

Implementing African National

Climate Change Policies

Esbern Friis-Hansen

If economic marginalization is reinforced by the manner in which climate finance is utilized, and if social and cultural exclusion is not addressed by the manner in which access to public service, resources and assets is addressed through local government, then meeting the challenge of climate change would be continued “to be difficult”.

(Webster, 2015, p.4)

From Climate Change Policy to Action

Climate change adaptation poses a new challenge for governance in Africa and is surrounded by considerable ambiguity. Policies addressing climate change adaptation have only recently emerged, driven by an international narrative, and are not widely understood or accepted by all stakeholders. This chapter aims to identify the drivers behind climate change policies, the intentions for their implementation, and the balance between national and subnational administrative levels with regard to control over finance, decision making and action.

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Medium 9781576336274

Geometry: COOP-HSPT Arithmetic

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781622500277

Redundancy

Elliott Quinley Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Redundancy

An effective sentence contains only those words necessary to express the main idea.

Any words or phrases that do not add to meaning are redundant. The best sentences are never too wordy; they are concise and to the point. redundant sentence:

The bracelet which is made of solid silver was made by an artist in Mexico. concise sentence:

The solid silver bracelet was made by a Mexican artist.

Notice that eliminating extra words makes the sentence easier to read and understand.

A. Read each sentence carefully. Then rewrite it on the line, eliminating repetition

and redundancy. Hint: Look for unnecessary synonyms or definitions and phrases that can be shortened to one word.

1. School starts at 8:00 a.m. in the morning and ends at 3:00 p.m. in the afternoon.

__________________________________________________________________________

2. The little child called Rafael is a preschool student.

__________________________________________________________________________

3. Trimming and pruning trees can be done during any season of the year.

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Medium 9781576336984

Square Roots and Powers: SSAT-ISEE Arithmetic

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781616514235

Triangles 1

Michael Buckley Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Name

Date

Classifying Triangles

A triangle is a three-sided polygon. A polygon is a closed figure made up of segments, called sides, that intersect at the end points, called vertices.

Triangles are classified by their angles and their sides.

Classifying by angle:

50˚

65˚

65˚

Acute

60˚

20˚

60˚

60˚

60˚

Equiangular

90˚

40˚

120˚

Obtuse

30˚

Right

Classifying by side length:

15

10

10

12

9

Scalene

12

12

12

7

Isosceles

Equilateral

Use the figures above to complete the rules for classifying triangles.

Rules for classifying triangles by angle

1. An acute triangle has

acute angles.

2. An equiangular triangle has three

angles.

3. An obtuse triangle has one

angle.

4. A right triangle has one

angle.

Rules for classifying triangles by side length

1. A scalene triangle has

2. An isosceles triangle has at least

3. An equilateral triangle has

congruent sides. congruent sides. congruent sides.

E

Practice

Use the figure to the right.

1. Name an equilateral triangle.

2. Name a scalene triangle.

3. Name an obtuse triangle.

4. Name an acute triangle.

5. Name an isosceles triangle.

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Medium 9781576336977

"U" Words: SSAT-ISEE Essential Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781576336977

"C" Words: SSAT-ISEE Essential Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub
Medium 9781617836534

Chapter 4: Bowden's Beginnings

Alex Monnig SportsZone PDF

Seminoles

National champions at the time were determined by polls, such as the AP Poll. The Seminoles went into the Orange Bowl undefeated.

However, their national championship hopes were slim. Three other teams were also undefeated and ranked higher than Florida State. All three would likely have to lose their bowl games for Florida State to claim the title.

None of that ended up mattering. Oklahoma beat Florida State

24–7. But the Seminoles still finished the season ranked sixth in the AP

Poll. It was their highest end-of-season ranking to that point.

Much of the team’s talented defense returned in 1980. Three

All-Americans, Simmons and senior defensive backs Monk Bonasorte and

Bobby Butler, led a shutdown defense. Only one team allowed fewer points per game than Florida State.

The Seminoles finished the regular season 10–1. This time, they had beaten third-ranked Nebraska and fourth-ranked Pittsburgh along the

Chief Osceola and Renegade

[ 29 ]

ABD_NCAA_FSU_FPGS.indd 29

Bowden's Beginnings

In 1962, Florida State sophomore Bill Durham came up with an idea. He wanted a person dressed and painted as a native Seminole Indian to ride into the stadium on a horse and plant a spear at midfield before each game. The concept did not get much attention until Bowden took over as coach. He liked it. Chief Osceola and his horse

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Medium 9780253022790

Little Coat, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

HERE’S his ragged “roundabout”

Turn the pockets inside out:

See; his pen-knife, lost to use,

Rusted shut with apple-juice;

Here, with marbles, top and string,

Is his deadly “devil-sling,”

With its rubber, limp at last

As the sparrows of the past!

Beeswax—buckles—leather straps—

Bullets, and a box of caps,—

Not a thing of all, I guess,

But betrays some waywardness—

E’en these tickets, blue and red,

For the Bible-verses said—

Such as this his mem’ry kept—

“Jesus wept.”

Here’s a fishing hook-and-line,

Tangled up with wire and twine,

And dead angle-worms, and some

Slugs of lead and chewing-gum,

Blent with scents that can but come

From the oil of rhodium.

Here—a soiled, yet dainty note,

That some little sweetheart wrote,

Dotting,—“Vine grows round the stump,”

And—“My sweetest sugar lump!”

Wrapped in this—a padlock key

Where he’s filed a touch-hole—see!

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Medium 9781622500277

Frequently Confused Words

Elliott Quinley Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Frequently Confused Words

A. Read the definition and example sentence for each word. Then demonstrate correct usage by writing example sentences of your own.

can   physically able

may   implies permission

  Joe can do pushups.   You may leave early.

1. (can) ____________________________________________________________________

2. (may) ____________________________________________________________________

lie   to recline

lay   to place

  Lie down for a rest.   Lay the shirt in the box.

3. (lie) _____________________________________________________________________

4. (lay) _____________________________________________________________________

sit   take a seat

set   to place

  Sit on the green chair.   Set the vase on the mantel.

5. (sit) _____________________________________________________________________

6. (set) _____________________________________________________________________

loan something lent,

especially money

lend to give something or the use

of something for a while

  Thanks for the loan.   He will lend her his car.

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Medium 9781622500246

Developing an Outline

Emily Hutchinson Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

Developing an Outline

An outline is the framework for a planned composition. A writer creates an outline to plan and organize the major and minor points to be covered in the completed composition.

A. To show what you know about writing an outline, use words from the box to complete the sentences. Hint: You will not use all the words.

sketchy detailed write rearrange brief type review structured minor separate order draft details sequence plan thoughts topics original

An outline is simply a ___________________. It helps you organize your

___________________ in the most effective ___________________. The better your outline, the easier it will be to write your first ___________________.

Outlines vary with the ___________________ of writing you are doing. An appropriate outline for a research project would be quite

___________________ and ___________________. For a one-page business letter, a fairly ___________________ and ___________________ outline will usually be adequate. But whether your outline is long or short, it will always set out the major __________________ and the supporting

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Medium 9780253022790

Life-Lesson, A

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

THERE! little girl; don’t cry!

They have broken your doll, I know;

And your tea-set blue,

And your play-house, too,

Are things of the long ago;

But childish troubles will soon pass by.—

There! little girl; don’t cry!

There! little girl; don’t cry!

They have broken your slate, I know;

And the glad, wild ways

Of your school-girl days

Are things of the long ago;

But life and love will soon come by.—

There! little girl; don’t cry!

There! little girl; don’t cry!

They have broken your heart, I know;

And the rainbow gleams

Of your youthful dreams

Are things of the long ago;

But Heaven holds all for which you sigh.—

There! little girl; don’t cry!

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Medium 9781622500253

The Writing Process: Paraphrasing and Summarizing/ Final Project: Essay

Emily Hutchinson Saddleback Educational Publishing PDF

Basic Skills Practice

The Writing Process:

Paraphrasing and Summarizing

Paraphrasing and summarizing—what’s the difference between the two?

Read these definitions:

Paraphrasing is the act of restating an author’s idea in different words.

The purpose of paraphrasing is to clarify the author’s meaning for the reader.

Summarizing is the act of briefly stating the main ideas and supporting details presented in a longer piece of writing.

Here is an example of an author’s original words followed by a paraphrase:

“Down the mountain, moving beyond a curtain of quivering air, she saw the stage coming, perhaps with letters.” (Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose) paraphrase: She saw the stage coming from below, possibly carrying mail.

Here is the entire original paragraph and a summary of it:

“Down the mountain, moving beyond a curtain of quivering air, she saw the stage coming, perhaps with letters. If she started in five minutes, she would arrive at the

Cornish Camp post office at about the same time as the stage. But the post office was in the company store, where there were always loiterers—teamsters, drifters, men hunting work—whom Oliver did not want her to encounter alone. And Ewing, the manager of the store, was a man she thought insolent. She must wait another two hours, till Oliver came home, to know whether there was mail. If the truth were known, these days she always looked at his hands, for the gleam of paper, before she looked at his face.” summary: She saw the stage coming, possibly with mail. She could go to the Cornish

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Medium 9781576336267

"R" Words: COOP-HSPT Vocabulary

Ace Academics Ace Academics ePub

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