92 Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Upholstery, Rug, and Carpet Cleaning

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Label Removal

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Label Removal

• Products such as rubber cement solvent, Bestine sol-

vent, and Goo Gone will remove sticky labels, masking tape, and sticky residue left from labels on glass, pottery, and china.

Be very cautious when using any product on paper. Test a small area before applying the product to a label to be sure that it will not leave a greasy spot. You can easily ruin a paper collectible by using these products. I have had great luck with Goo Gone, but I still test each time I use it on paper.

For glass or china, peel away as much paper as you can.

Next, soften the residue by applying vinegar, hairspray, nail polish remover, mayonnaise, or peanut butter.

On painted surfaces, apply a hot rag or heat with a hairdryer. Be careful not to pull off the painted surface by working too quickly. You can reduce the value of a collectible item by removing the original paint.

On plastic, apply a hot rag, rub gently with a dab of peanut butter, or heat with a hairdryer set on warm.

On metal, rub gently with a dab of peanut butter.

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Medium 9781574411638

Lynall Thomas

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Lynall Thomas

Not much is known about Lynall Thomas, an Englishman credited with the design of complicated rifled shells of doubtful effectiveness supplied to the Confederacy. The shell consisted of a narrow shell body with a very large head. Behind the head a lead sleeve and lead disk were cast and a midshell thick iron band put on the outside of the lead sleeve. Another lead disk separated the midshell iron band from a thick rear iron band.

Upon firing, the iron bands were forced forward on the lead sleeve, squeezing the lead disks into the rifling.

Shells of this design have been recovered in three calibers: 4.62-inch, 5.82-inch, and

6.4-inch. Almost all the shells in each caliber come from only a single area. The 4.62inch shells come from Awendaw and Charleston, South Carolina. The single 5.82-inch shell is from the West Point collection, and all of the 6.4-inch Lynall Thomas shells come from the areas around Fort Fisher and nearby Fort Caswell.

Only one complete fired specimen has been noted (the 6.4-inch shell documented in this book). It appears to have taken the rifling effectively.

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Medium 9781574414516

Ivory or Bone

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Lacquered Items

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

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