90 Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Tools to Keep on Hand

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

xii

Tips, Tools, & Techniques

Georgia co-authored three Denton history books during her tenure as museum director. She writes a monthly column for the Denton Record-Chronicle, and has had articles on collecting and caring for antiques in the Antique Almanac, Antique

Prime, and the Latino Times magazines. She was an appraiser for Antiques Roadshow and currently teaches courses on antiques and collectibles and owns enVogue & Vintage at the

Antique Gallery in Denton, Texas. For more information on her classes, contact georgiacaraway@aol.com.

TOOLS TO KEEP ON HAND

• Acid-free paper and boxes (available from craft stores

and library and museum suppliers). Protects photographs, prints, and textiles.

Black light. A device that emits ultraviolet radiation

(UV) light and can detect cracks in pottery and glue repairs in paper items.

Brushes. Soft-bristled baby brushes (try saying that quickly!) are great for cleaning the delicate fabric on lampshades. Makeup brushes are great for cleaning Christmas ornaments and dusting delicate items with crevices.

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Parrott

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Parrott

Robert Parker Parrott was both the most successful and the most controversial designer and founder of rifled cannon and projectiles of the Civil War. His West Point Foundry was located in Cold Spring, New York, across the Hudson River from the United States Military

Academy at West Point. During the war, Parrott and the West Point Foundry produced over 3,100 cannon, twice as many as the combined cannon production of all Confederate foundries and 33 percent more than any other Union foundry.1 Parrott also produced more rifled projectiles for the Union military forces than any other foundry.

Parrott got a head start in producing rifled cannon and projectiles because of his experimental work in the late 1850s. Parrott worked on rifled cannon designs in cooperation with Dr. John Read of Alabama, who worked on projectile designs.2 By 1861 they had already worked out many of the practical problems of integrated rifle-projectile design for field caliber artillery.

Parrott was already selling field caliber rifles to individual states before the war began.3

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Rugs

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Mildew Cleaner

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Plastics

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Plastics

For this section we will use the generic word plastic to describe Celluloid, Lucite, Plexiglas, Bakelite, Catalin, and other polymer acrylic products.

Celluloid, the first synthetic plastic material, was developed in the 1860s and 1870s from a formulation of nitrocellulose and camphor. It is a moldable material that was capable of low-cost production in a variety of colors.

Celluloid was made into toiletry articles, novelties, photographic film, and many other mass-produced goods.

Celluloid is highly flammable and its popularity began to wane toward the middle of the 20th century, following the introduction of plastics based entirely on synthetic polymers. Lucite and Plexiglas are trademarked names of synthetic, colorless, and highly transparent materials with high stability and good resistance to weathering and to shock. Lucite and Plexiglas can be tinted or rendered opaque by the addition of other substances. They are usually fabricated by molding into solid articles or casting into sheets. Bakelite, invented in 1907, is a phenolic resin used for making vintage radio cases, jewelry, kitchen utensils, and a myriad of other highly collectible items.

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