92 Slices
Medium 9781574414516

China

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

China

31

• This method of cleaning collectible china (Flow Blue,

Ironstone, Harker Cameo, etc.) has been tested by experts and proven effective. This method will remove brown spots and lighten the effects from crazing.

Clear hydrogen peroxide, 30 or 40 percent volume, may be safely used to clean your china pieces. This solution can be obtained at your local beauty supply dealer. If they do not stock clear hydrogen peroxide in these percentages, ask them to order it. Never use hydrogen peroxide over 40 percent. It is too strong.

Work in a well-ventilated area, and do not breathe the fumes. Do not expose your skin or eyes to the peroxide.

Wear rubber gloves, as the hydrogen peroxide can burn your skin.

Pour the peroxide into an airtight, plastic container that has a sealable cover. Hydrogen peroxide is combustible. Do not place the container near a heater or an open flame.

Submerge your china in the solution and seal the cover.

Check the container every few days by carefully opening the lid. You will notice that the discoloration has begun to disappear. Very dirty pieces may take one and a half weeks of soaking.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574411638

Absterdam

Jack Bell University of North Texas Press PDF

Absterdam

John Absterdam patented a number of projectile designs in 1862 and 1864. The Union

Army Absterdam shells were made in the 3-inch and 4.5-inch calibers. Two of these 4.5inch designs are included in the book, having been used in the 1864-65 RichmondPetersburg siege.

There are three designs of Absterdam projectiles: Type 1 has a lead cup sabot and two lead bourrelets; Type 2 has a lead cup sabot and one (upper) lead bourrelet; and Type 3 has a brass ring sabot with no bourrrelets. A hybrid Type 2/3 is documented in this book, with a brass ring sabot and one upper lead bourrelet.

Absterdam had contracts with at least three foundries in addition to his own foundry to manufacture his projectiles: Dickson & Zane of Philadelphia; Chase, Sharp & Thompson of Philadelphia; and A.J. Smith.1 The first 3-inch Absterdam shells were ordered by the

Union Ordnance Department from Chase, Sharp & Thompson on July 28, 1863, and delivered on February 8, 1864.2 The first 4.5-inch Absterdam projectiles were ordered by the Union Ordnance Department through Dickson & Zane on March 17, 1864, and delivered on September 27, 1864.3

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Vintage Clothing and Textiles

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

Vintage Clothing and Textiles

125

• Vary the way you fold textiles/clothing.

• Stuff the sleeves of coats, blouses, or dresses with acid•

free tissue in order to prevent creases.

Cover cardboard rolls with polyester or cotton batting and muslin wrapping.

Check storage areas two to three times a year for insects.

Use padded hangers that fit the shoulders of the clothing.

Do not store vintage fabrics in plastic cleaners bags or plastic storage bags. Do not use zip-locked bags for small items. Moisture buildup can cause mold and mildew.

Do not store fabrics that have been starched. They will attract silverfish and other pests.

Sugar was a popular starching material in the old days.

Remove sugar by washing the piece before storing (consult a professional for vintage fabrics). Critters love to munch on sugar-starched textiles.

Do not store or display garments in sunlight. Bright light will fade the colors.

HOW TO PAD HANGERS

• Cut white cotton sheets or muslin into strips.

• Use wooden hangers, if available, because they are stur-

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574414516

Ivory or Bone

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF
Medium 9781574414516

Steel

Georgia Kemp Caraway University of North Texas Press PDF

See All Slices