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7. Ethical Leadership - You Don•t Need Leaders to TellPeople the Good News

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

7. Ethical Leadership

You Don’t Need Leaders to Tell

People the Good News

Approximately 45 minutes (more, if the group is large)

OVERVIEW

You need leaders, according to Lee Iacocca, to tell people things they don’t want to hear and then get them to do things they don’t want to do. This exercise requires participants, working alone, to complete a comparison matrix. It then challenges them to think of a difficult-to-swallow message derived from the matrix and to strategize how that message can be made digestible.

PURPOSE

To elicit thoughts regarding best ethical practices.

To develop awareness of the gap between the ideal and the real.

To outline a message that might close the ethical gap.

GROUP SIZE

The exercise will work with any size group. Participants first work alone and then make a short presentation to three others.

ROOM ARRANGEMENT

Flexible seating, if possible, so that participants can form small groups after working alone on the first part of the exercise.

MATERIALS

Handout 7.1, “Comparison Matrix”

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#23: (Finger) Food for Thought

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

#23: (Finger) Food for Thought

Overview:

Mindstretching is the focus of this activity; it requires participants to demonstrate digital dexterity and then to flex their mental muscles with a question that asks, “How many uses can you think of for this?”

Objective:

To aid participants in feeling comfortable with thinking outside the box.

Supplies:

Time:

Copies of Worksheet #23-1, one per participant

Transparencies #23-1 and #23-2

Overhead projector

Inexpensive Oscar-type statue (optional)

15–20 minutes

Advance

Preparation:

Make copies of the handout. Make transparencies for Transparency #23-1 and #23-2. Arrange seating, if possible, so participants can work in pairs. If you opt to present the Academy Award, purchase a small statue.

Participants/

Application:

Both parts of this exercise serve as introductory exercises—they call for keeping an open mind, which is a basic requirement for participants who expect to leave the training session with more knowledge than they possessed coming in. The two interactions can also be used any time during the training session to show participants you appreciate their willingness to consider opinions other than their own.

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#12: If the Hat Fits

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

#12: If the Hat Fits

Overview:

In the business world, we are often asked how we feel about a particular point of view. This activity develops critical thinking by asking participants to tell if they concur or disagree with a point of view they take “out of a hat.”

Objective:

To develop quickness of thought by reacting to presented quotations.

Supplies:

Time:

Old hat

Handout #12-1, cut into strips

Transparency #12-1

Overhead projector

Podium (optional)

5–10 minutes, plus 1 additional minute per participant

Advance

Preparation:

Cut the quotations on Handout #12-1 into strips; fold each strip, and put them into an old hat. Make a transparency from Transparency #12-1. Arrange seating facing the front of the room and near a podium, if possible.

Participants/

Application:

Because some participants may be fearful of making a presentation, no matter how brief, suggest that the presentations could be made from their seats or even not at all, should someone wish to decline. The exercise works with any size class. It should be used in the second half of the training session to give participants the opportunity to get to know each other better and thus lessen their nervousness.

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#20: Perspicacious Perspectives

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

#20: Perspicacious Perspectives

Overview:

Participants will have to move around in this exercise. They will select a pair of shoes, read a self-revealing statement by and about the shoes’ owner, and then view a problem from this person’s perspective.

Objective:

To develop creative thinking by viewing a problem from an unusual perspective.

Supplies:

Time:

Scraps of paper (one for each participant)

Flipchart

Aerosol can of room deodorizer (optional)

About 15 minutes

Advance

Preparation:

None required.

Participants/

Application:

This exercise works with any size group. In terms of sequence, it makes an idea-energizer or session stimulator. It is not recommended as a session starter, however, for it may cause some participants to erroneously assume the entire training sessions will be comprised of “touchy-feely” activities.

Introduction to Concept:

Some of the best ideas evolve from a thinker’s ability to put him- or herself in the mind of someone else or to make unusual connections. For example, an architect once described architecture as “frozen music.” And when management guru Peter Drucker was asked by a young manager how he could become an outstanding manager, Drucker replied, “Learn to play the violin.” By focusing on an altogether new set of circumstances, by viewing work life from an entirely new perspective, we can acquire fresh insights into existing practices.

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#43: Direct Responses

Marlene Caroselli HRD Press, Inc. PDF

#43: Direct Responses

Overview:

Separated physically as well as by task, participants will write directions for their partners to follow. The directions ask them to draw a geometric design.

Objective:

To foster analysis of a task and to determine the best way of directing others to perform that task.

Supplies:

Time:

Handout #43-1 “A” for half the participants and “B” for the remaining half

25 minutes

Advance

Preparation:

Make copies of Handout #43-1 (half the number as the number of participants) and cut in half. The two halves of the room will work on two separate assignments. Seating should be arranged for this division.

Participants/

Application:

This exercise will work with any number of participants. It is an excellent warm-up activity, but is also helpful when there has been a miscommunication between or among participants or between participants and facilitator.

As a session-stimulator, it could be presented via a compliment: “You have managed to follow all the instructions I’ve presented thus far. However, I have been presenting instructions for a number of years. Let’s see how well you can present instructions to a partner.”

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