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Medium 9781782201823

Chapter Nine - Between “Other” and “Other”: Merleau-Ponty as a Precursor of the Analytic Field

Giuseppe Civitarese Karnac Books ePub

Intermediacy

According to Pontalis, Freud is “a thinker of conflict rather than of the intermediate” (Pontalis, 2007, p. 316). Two kinds of thought coexist in him: binary thought, made up of dichotomies such as conscious/ unconscious, primary process/secondary process, pleasure principle/ reality principle, or narcissistic libido/object libido; and ternary thought, as with the threefold division of the first topography into Ucs.- Pcs.-Cs. or the ego-id-superego structure of the second topography. However, even if what predominates in Freud is dualism and the idea of psychic life as essentially based on the conflict of agencies, forces, quantities, and wishes, he was keenly aware of the need to conceive of the intermediate, or, to use a more abstract term, intermediacy. This is suggested by his evocative neologism1 of the Zwischenreich, the “in-between realm” or “half-way region.” The term already appears in a letter dated 16 April 1896 to Fliess, his Berlin friend and correspondent (Freud, 1985, p. 181), in which, though, it is not quite clear what Freud is referring to. Jeffrey Masson, the editor of this edition of the correspondence, notes that, according to Schur, he is alluding to the unconscious and the body-mind relationship, and that Fliess was subsequently to make use of it in connection with the subject of bisexuality.

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Medium 9781782205425

Chapter Two: The Rules of the Game

Antonino Ferro Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER TWO

The rules of the game

While we are on the subject of games, the first thing you do when you begin playing is to establish some rules, without which the game is something else. So we start by fixing the rules that constitute our setting. The British once did five sessions a week. In Europe one generally travelled “by car”, on four wheels. In France they have the tricycle…

…or the sidecar.

Or the sidecar. New analysts and many therapists have, when things go well, a motor scooter, when things go badly a push scooter. On this subject, some say that anything less than three sessions per week is not analysis, because the method of free association loses its meaning in a low frequency relationship. Moreover you mentioned among the analyst's tools the deconstruction of actual speech; to what extent does doing this kind of transformation remain viable in a low frequency analysis—that we might even call psychoanalytic psychotherapy? These are situations in which external reality is knocking very loudly on the door.

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CHAPTER TWO: On the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis

Roberto Basile Karnac Books ePub

Cláudio Laks Eizirik

When Freud (1912) recommended the adoption of a state of “evenly suspended attention”, he meant that the analyst should be open to whatever arises, without prejudices of any kind, and without systematically seeking confirmation of any previous hypothesis. Adopting this position could help him in the delicate and what is even now the somehow mysterious process of the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis.

In his seminal paper of 1934, Strachey stated that the final result of a psychoanalytic treatment is to enable the patient's whole mental organization, which was held in check at an infantile stage of development, to continue its progress towards a normal adult stage. The principal effective alteration consists, according to him, in a profound qualitative modification of the patient's superego, from which the other alterations would follow for the most part automatically. This modification of the patient's superego is brought about in a series of innumerable small steps through mutative interpretations, which are effected by the analyst by virtue of his position as the object of the patient's id-impulses and as an auxiliary superego. However, according to Strachey, the fact that the mutativeinterpretation was the ultimate operative factor in the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis does not imply the exclusion of many other procedures (such as suggestion, reassurance, abreaction, etc.) as elements in the treatment of any particular patient. (Strachey, 1934).

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CHAPTER THREE: The enlarged notion of field in psychoanalysis

Roberto Basile Karnac Books ePub

Claudio Neri

Key words: Field; Transformations; Alfa Function; Narration; The Analytic Third

This paper has been divided into two sections. The first part focuses on a comparison between field and other notions that, although somewhat similar to field, don't exactly coincide with the term. The second section begins with the paragraph on alfa-function and develops the idea of “enlarged field”.

The first works in a (dual) psychoanalytic context which introduce the bi-personal field concept are by Madeleine and Willy Baranger and propose a broadening of the Kleinian school psychoanalysis through concepts that come from Gestalt psychology and Merleau Ponty's “in situation” psychology of man (1964). «The structural characteristics of the analytic situation require a necessary description with the help of the field concept. The analytic situation has its own spatial and temporal structure, and is oriented along deter-45 minate dynamic lines of force; it has its own laws of development, general and momentary objectives. This field is our immediate and specific object of observation». (Baranger and Baranger, 1961). Considering that both patient and analyst take part in the same dynamic process, the Barangers (1978) recognize the individuals that are involved in the field, the field that they themselves produce and in which they are immersed. The field isn't the sum of inner situations that belong to members of the couple, nor can it be amenable to one or the other, instead, it takes the form of a third element with independent qualities and dynamics. The analytic field, defined as such, is made up of three levels. The first level corresponds to the formal aspects and the basic contract (setting), the second level corresponds to the dynamic aspects of the manifest content and verbal interaction, and the third corresponds to the functional aspect of integration and insight as regards unconscious bi-personal fantasy. The unconscious bi-personal fantasy represents the most original aspect of the Barangers’ proposal and it combines Kleinian concepts with those of field: it is in fact made up of the overlap of projective identifications belonging to the two members of the analytic pair. The unconscious bi-personal fantasy is the specific object of analysis, the scope is to mobilize the field and allow the projection and introjection processes to reactivate themselves, as their paralysis causes sufferance.

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Chapter One: Identity

Antonino Ferro Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER ONE

Identity

This book is meant to be a self-defence handbook for new, usually young, analysts. What do new analysts have to defend themselves from?

To begin with, I believe that young analysts should defend their opportunity to be young. A few days ago I was reading about an Italian colleague who, in reference to an analyst of sixty-two years, maintained that he had better respect the views of older analysts rather than engage in polemics with them. So an analyst of sixty-two years is still considered a young analyst.

I would hope that young analysts will be, in a matter of not too much time, thirty or thirty-five. That is, that the professional age of the members of psychoanalytic associations can be aligned with their actual age, whereas now there is a twenty, thirty years “bonus” of sorts, so that a young associate is sixty-two years old, a young ordinary is sixty-five, and so on.

And this is a relevant first point. But I'd wager there's more…

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