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Chapter Nine: Dreaming

Ferro, Antonino; Nicoli,Luca Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER NINE

Dreaming

And so we get to the dream, at last. Freud—and on this we agree—taught us that the dream plays an important role in our internal world. Today, for every ten analysts, you will find eleven different ways to interpret dreams. The dream depicts the patient's internal world, signals his unconscious desires, his way of relating with others, represents his relationship with the analyst, or the analysis phase he is going through. It gives shape to that which cannot be represented.

In this maze, it seems that contemporary psychoanalysis is shifting the focus from the latent content of the dream to the manifest content. Indeed, the widely held habit of asking associations to the dream is currently being questioned. Is there “work in progress” along the Royal Road to the unconscious?

Since we have to start from the past to understand Ogden I would like to mention Calderón de la Barca's Life is a Dream. I would say that the whole analytic session is a dream, because a session of analysis moves from the assumption—as Aldo Costa, Francesco Corrao's first pupil, who should not be forgotten, said—that the first bereavement the analyst has to go through is the bereavement of reality. From the moment you are in analysis, indeed, everything the patient says is not to be considered as a reality, in any case.

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Chapter One - The Meaning and use of Metaphor in Analytic Field Theory

Civitarese, Giuseppe; Ferro, Antonino Karnac Books ePub

As I lay in bed, with my eyes shut, I said to myself that everything is capable of transposition.

—Marcel Proust, The Prisoner

Each of the principal psychoanalytic models is underlain by certain key metaphors. For example, the archaeological and surgical metaphors, as well as that of the analyst-as-screen, all throw light on some of Freud's basic concepts. In classical psychoanalysis, however, metaphor still tends to be an illegitimate or secondary element. Analytic field theory, on the other hand, reserves a completely different place for it, both as an instrument of technique in clinical work and as a conceptual device in theoretical activity.

Metaphor and the field are linked in a chiasm: The field metaphor transforms Kleinian relational theory into a radically intersubjective theory, which in turn places metaphor at a point along the spectrum of dreaming—to paraphrase Bion, it is the stuff of analysis.

For the sake of illustration, we examine first the origins and meaning of the field metaphor in analytic field theory; we then consider the mutual implications of this particular development of post-Bion psychoanalysis and the modern linguistic theory of metaphor; and, finally, we put the theoretical hypotheses discussed in the first part of this contribution to work in the clinical situation.

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Chapter Nine - Between “Other” and “Other”: Merleau-Ponty as a Precursor of the Analytic Field

Civitarese, Giuseppe; Ferro, Antonino Karnac Books ePub

Intermediacy

According to Pontalis, Freud is “a thinker of conflict rather than of the intermediate” (Pontalis, 2007, p. 316). Two kinds of thought coexist in him: binary thought, made up of dichotomies such as conscious/ unconscious, primary process/secondary process, pleasure principle/ reality principle, or narcissistic libido/object libido; and ternary thought, as with the threefold division of the first topography into Ucs.- Pcs.-Cs. or the ego-id-superego structure of the second topography. However, even if what predominates in Freud is dualism and the idea of psychic life as essentially based on the conflict of agencies, forces, quantities, and wishes, he was keenly aware of the need to conceive of the intermediate, or, to use a more abstract term, intermediacy. This is suggested by his evocative neologism1 of the Zwischenreich, the “in-between realm” or “half-way region.” The term already appears in a letter dated 16 April 1896 to Fliess, his Berlin friend and correspondent (Freud, 1985, p. 181), in which, though, it is not quite clear what Freud is referring to. Jeffrey Masson, the editor of this edition of the correspondence, notes that, according to Schur, he is alluding to the unconscious and the body-mind relationship, and that Fliess was subsequently to make use of it in connection with the subject of bisexuality.

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Chapter Two: The Rules of the Game

Ferro, Antonino; Nicoli,Luca Karnac Books ePub

CHAPTER TWO

The rules of the game

While we are on the subject of games, the first thing you do when you begin playing is to establish some rules, without which the game is something else. So we start by fixing the rules that constitute our setting. The British once did five sessions a week. In Europe one generally travelled “by car”, on four wheels. In France they have the tricycle…

…or the sidecar.

Or the sidecar. New analysts and many therapists have, when things go well, a motor scooter, when things go badly a push scooter. On this subject, some say that anything less than three sessions per week is not analysis, because the method of free association loses its meaning in a low frequency relationship. Moreover you mentioned among the analyst's tools the deconstruction of actual speech; to what extent does doing this kind of transformation remain viable in a low frequency analysis—that we might even call psychoanalytic psychotherapy? These are situations in which external reality is knocking very loudly on the door.

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CHAPTER EIGHT: The analytic third: Working with intersubjective clinical facts

Karnac Books ePub

Thomas H. Ogden

In this paper, two clinical sequences are presented in an effort to describe the methods by which the analyst attempts to recognise, understand and verbally symbolise for himself and the analysand the specific nature of the moment-to-moment interplay of the analyst's subjective experience, the subjective experience of the analy-sand and the intersubjectively-generated experience of the analytic pair (the experience of the analytic third). The first clinical discussion describes how the intersubjective experience created by the analytic pair becomes accessible to the analyst in part through the analyst's experience of ‘his own’ reveries, forms of mental activity that often appear to be nothing more than narcissistic self-absorption, distract-edness, compulsive rumination, daydreaming and the like. A second clinical account focuses on an instance in which the analyst's somatic delusion, in conjunction with the analysand's sensory experiences and body-related fantasies, served as a principal medium through which the analyst experienced and came to understand the meaning of the leading anxieties that were being (intersubjectively) generated.And he is not likely to know what is to be done unless he lives in what is not merely the present, but the present moment of the past, unless he is conscious, not of what is dead, but of what is already living (T. S. Eliot, 1919, p. 11).

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