55 Chapters
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20 • The Macaque Sisters

Lynn Marie Cuny University of North Texas Press PDF

The Macaque Sisters • 97

isolation must surely be a living hell. When

I learned that we had the opportunity to give these two monkeys a new life, I knew we could not say no.

Quickly we had to go about the task of building an enclosure next to the rhesus macaque, and her friend, the little female crab-eating macaque from Florida. With a tall oak tree and several bushy cedars, it was the perfect home for the two new monkeys.

After weeks of labor on the part of our staff, the day finally came for the eighteen-year-old sisters to arrive. They were being driven in from Washington by their rescuers. The day was sunny and warm. The monkeys sat quietly in the transport cages as we carried them to their new home. Their eyes were wide and bright as they surveyed the Sanctuary. Chickens strutted about and a beautiful blue peacock displayed his plumage. The rhesus monkey came to see who her new neighbors were and the crab-eating macques were looking on to see what all the excitement was about.

As their wire carrying cage touched the ground, the monkeys' soft, naked feet felt the gentle earth for the first time in many years. Their eyes darted from side to side as I immediately opened their door to freedom. Finally, the two monkeys had come home. As the shy sisters peered through the door, one bolted out and leaped fearlessly into the limbs of the oak tree hanging overhead. The other could not wait any longer.

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Medium 9781574412161

The Grand Old Girl Adopts a Daughter

Lynn Marie Cuny University of North Texas Press PDF

The Grand Old Girl Adopts a Daughter

We rarely have the privilege of getting to know a tiny baby wild animal, to watch her grow, and to finally see her once again in the company of her own kind, thriving and being loved and cared for close to the very way nature intended. But this past year I was just so privileged.

It was early summer when we received the call. An infant rhesus monkey had been a victim of the cruel trade in wildlife. She, like all helpless infants who are exploited by this business, had been ripped away from her mother’s care shortly after birth to be sold into the

“pet” market. These sensitive, intelligent animals are abused and exploited—all for the sake of profit to the breeders and dealers who continue to benefit by making innocent animals suffer. This particular baby had been purchased by someone who was no longer able to care for her. She had become “destructive” and had to be removed from their home. The fact of the matter was that she should never have been made available for purchase; wildlife belongs in the wild, not cooped up in living rooms or in backyards forced to live out their days in cruel confinement.

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21 • The Fawn and the Doe

Lynn Marie Cuny University of North Texas Press PDF

The Fawn and the Doe. 101

she just lay there, wet and fragile and helpless. It seemed like hours, but in only a few seconds the little miracle began to breathe. We were relieved to see that there was a chance she would survive, but there was still a tremendous amount of work to be done. We had a new baby to feed and a mother who had to be taken immediately to the Sanctuary to recover from the surgery and anesthesia.

We rushed the two critical animals to their next phase of treatment. Once at the Sanctuary the tiny female fawn was slowly bottle-fed warm fawn formula (her mother could no longer nurse her because of her own wounds and the stitches from her surgery); she was kept on a heating pad so that she could stabilize her body temperature. It was touch-and-go with the baby because she had absorbed some of the drugs given to her mother during the surgery. We had to be sure she could swallow and that she did not aspirate any of the formula. We also had to consider the danger she was in from not having any of the natural immunities she would have received from her mother's milk. Fortunately, we keep colostrum on hand at the Sanctuary for just these kinds of emergencies.

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10 • Rescued from the Dark

Lynn Marie Cuny University of North Texas Press PDF

Rescued from the Dark • 47

Once he was inside the room, the young cat did her best to hide under a small table or crouch behind an empty cardboard box that was lying on the filthy floor. She had no reason to be anything but terrified of this new intruder. Finally, Tim was able to dart her. Once tranquilized, she slowly began to calm down. Now she could be placed in a carrier and safely transported to the Sanctuary.

When she arrived, of course, she did not know where she was. She was anxious and hungry. She had been living in total darkness but was now surrounded not only by light, but scents and sounds as well.

The young cat was curious and acutely aware of the fact that she was in a new world. She was also aware that there were other cougars in this new world. People who breed mountain lions to be sold to the public deprive them of their mother's care when they are only weeks old. After she was taken away from her mother, it is unlikely that she had ever been in the company of other mountain lions. She was about to be introduced to a brand new family.

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Rookery Rescue

Lynn Marie Cuny University of North Texas Press PDF

Rookery Rescue

It seems that almost every day we learn that another green space has fallen under the blade. Even though we are disturbed as more trees are killed and more natural habitat destroyed, we watch from a safe distance as this occurs. For the wild animals living in these areas, the experience is quite different.

Late in the summer of 1999, the local newspapers, radio, and television news media reported an incident that took place in south

San Antonio, Texas. There lay a quiet, wooded spot that for many years, hundreds of egrets called home. This home had everything the birds needed: tall, densely foliaged green trees, the nearby river, plenty of insects, and best of all, perfect nest sites. This quiet spot was so perfect that the egrets returned year after year to lay their eggs and rear their young. Sadly, all of that was soon to change.

It seems that an individual who either was not aware of the egrets’ presence or was simply not sympathetic to the birds owned this perfect spot.

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