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14. Case Taking

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

Case Taking

T

he opening line of one of Joan Didions best novels, A Book of Common Prayer, is a simple sentence. I will be her witness. Joan Didion would have made a hell of a homeopath.

In his book Language in Thought and Action, S. I. Hayakawa informs us that we cannot not communicate.*

When you take a homeopathic case, keep both of these statements in mind. Remember that your purpose is to be the patients witness. And that the process of case taking is an act of communicationa process that is always happening, but not always verbal.

The case takers primary job is to witness the patient in his or her wholeness. This takes more than a willingness to listen to the patient and dutifully record what he or she says. Although that can certainly be part of the job.

No, the job of the case taker is to record the whole of the patients being, if you will. This first requires that you enter into the process without judgment, either of the patient or of what the patient may need in terms of a remedy. (In order to avoid early judgments, I tend never to look at any intake form that might tell me the nature of the patients complaints or anything about them. Just watch how they walk in the room, how they sit, what they are wearing. Notice if they have any particular scent, from perfume to body odor. Notice anything unusual about them, from their make-up to their facial expression.) From the moment that the patient walks in the door until they have closed it behind them, it is the role of the case taker to record all data possible, not just the list of the patients ailments.

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15. Case Management

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

Case Management

A

fter you have finished taking the case, everything else is case management.

 

Case management includes the research you undertake in order to find the remedy. It includes the thinking that you put into the choice of the potency and dosage. It includes all the notes you make in your research and all the notes you take as you follow the remedys action through your patients reports. And it involves a statement of what you learned from your failure or success at the end of the treatment.

Many would-be practitioners want to take shortcuts in their case management. But I have found that this quite simply is not a good idea. One homeopath I knew insisted that he never had to repertorize his cases, that he took them and then, based upon the information that he had memorized over time, he selected the remedy. The fact that he had an awful track record when it came to cures never seemed to suggest to him that he try another way.

The best and most successful cases are always those that are managed well. The cure, like God, is always in the details.

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12. Combining Remedies

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

12

                          

Combining Remedies

When we begin working with Bach’s remedies, it is best to remember that Bach felt that all of us need all thirty-eight remedies, some perhaps more generally in our individual lives, and others perhaps more strongly at any given moment. But we all need all of them. Therefore, we truly cannot make a mistake in giving or taking any of the remedies.

Remember, Bach also said that his remedies were benign. They cannot cause harm. The remedies can be mixed with any other form of treatment, from allopathic drugs to acupuncture and chiropractics.1

In fact, the only remedies I have found that do not work well when they are used concurrently with the flower remedies are Hahnemann’s homeopathic remedies. This is because they are too similar to each other in action, and because there is an issue with potency as well. Because homeopathic remedies are made in a wide range of potencies and the Bach remedies are always given in what is considered a “zero” potency or mother tincture, the potency of the homeopathically prepared remedies will overwhelm the weaker Bach remedies, while the Bach remedies will interfere with the potency of the homeopathics. Together they will disrupt when they should cure. In short, at best, they will cancel each other out, and at worst, they can create an unnecessary healing crisis. Note that, in some instances, Bach’s remedies can work well with Hahnemann’s, but only if the homeopathic remedies are given in a potency high enough to not cause interference. Therefore, if a person is on a homeopathic constitutional treatment and is given a remedy of 1M (1 part in 1,000 in the homeopathic millesimal scale) or above, one can wait a few days for that remedy to “set in” and then follow up with a Bach remedy or mixture of remedies. These will not interfere with each other and will, in fact, assist each other in their work. But given the potencies involved and the complexity of the treatment, such a combination should always be undertaken under the supervision of an experienced professional.

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10. Considering the Seventh Mood: The Faces of Loneliness

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

10

                          

Considering the Seventh Mood: The Faces of Loneliness

Perhaps if we are truly secure and happy with our true self, we can never be lonely. But the fact that Bach has gathered together the three remedies in this small group for the sake of those who are lonely suggests that Bach himself felt that loneliness is universal, like despair and fear, and that none of us are truly secure within ourselves. The remedies gathered here are those that will allow us to soothe our complaints relating to the void within ourselves that we call loneliness, and allow us to be brought into a state of emotional balance in which we can be fully at peace with self.

Each of the three remedies in this group feels the hollow core of loneliness, and each displays a different pattern of emotion, thought, and behavior as a result.

The remedies gathered here are those that will allow us to soothe our complaints relating to the void within ourselves that we call loneliness, and allow us to be brought into a state of emotional balance in which we can be fully at peace with self.

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Appendix

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

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