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7. Considering the Fourth Mood: Self Versus Others: Oversensitivity to the World

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

7

                          

Considering the Fourth Mood: Self Versus Others: Oversensitivity to the World

Life is a process. It is a process of learning. It is a process of stimulus and response. Throughout our entire lives, from birth onward, we take in impressions, and those impressions shape our experiences on an emotional, mental, and physical level. These experiences—which are born from our individual and unique responses to the stimuli that constantly assault us—teach us the realities of the world around us. Further, they suggest to us the way we should live and instruct us about the rules of conduct and behavior by which life is governed.

Whether we live in a big city and are constantly assaulted by traffic, noise, bright lights, and the crush of the crowd or in a rural environment, our minds and bodies are confronted each day with new sensory stimuli. Each day we have new thoughts and new moods, and undergo a wide range of fleeting emotional states. Our responses are broadly based upon our experiences as well as on our environment and the stresses and challenges that it offers. No matter how beneficial or stressful our environment, we are in a constant state of action and reaction.

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Contents

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub
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Dedication

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub
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4. Considering the First Mood: The Aspects of Fear

McCabe, Vinton Basic Health Publications ePub

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Considering the First Mood: The Aspects of Fear

I start with fear because it is an animal emotion. It is perhaps our most basic negative emotional state; certainly it typifies the most basic negative experience of our inner lives and the lives we lead when inter playing with the world around us. Fear lurks around corners, under beds, in small spaces, and in front of large crowds. And we all, at some point in our lives, have clutched our chests in the middle of the night as we realized that we, too, are destined to someday die. We all experience fear many times in our lives, to one degree or another. For some of us, fear is a transitory condition. For others, it is chronic, and it defines and controls their life. It dictates how money is spent, what foods are eaten, even whether the children are allowed to go to a party or school dance.1 Therefore the remedies in this category—those for patients who fear—are always needed, in one way or another, at one time or another, by every patient. That is the reason that I list them here first.

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3. The Bach Flower Remedies: An Introduction

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The Bach Flower Remedies: An Introduction

As we look at Bach’s thirty-eight remedies one at a time, be aware that I have grouped the remedies by Bach’s seven “moods.”1 As he lists them, these moods are: Fear, Uncertainty, Insufficient Interest in Present Circumstances, Loneliness, Oversensitivity to Influences and Ideas, Despondency or Despair, and Over-Concern for the Welfare of Others. Note that some of the names for these conditions have been changed slightly in this book. I have also ordered the moods in a manner that, for me at least, makes their study more comprehensible.

Where applicable, I have also noted that a particular remedy is one of Bach’s original Twelve Healers, the remedies he saw as archetypes for the ills that plague all mankind. Also, where applicable, I have indicated that a particular remedy may be considered more of a long-term remedy or more often be used only in the short-term. This information can be of particular importance in the individualizing of combined remedies and in giving the Bach practitioner a guidepost for knowing which flower remedies act faster and which work more slowly. In the same way, when administering the remedies, it is helpful to know which are naturally more acute in their actions, and which may be considered to be more or less on the same footing as the polycrests2 or constitutional remedies in classical homeopathy. (Note that, while all Bach remedies may be used in both acute or chronic cases, some work better acutely, while others are more suited to what homeopaths would call “constitutional” treatments. Such treatments speak to long-term issues or emotional patterns and therefore are used for a longer period of time. Turn to Chapter 12 for more information about the combining of the remedies and their doses.)

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