4737 Slices
Medium 9781475814460

Activist Teacher Leadership: A Case Study of a Programa CRIAR Bilingual Teacher Cohort

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Deborah Palmer

Virginia Snodgrass Rangel

Richard M. Gonzales

Vanessa Morales

Activist Teacher Leadership: A Case Study of a Programa CRIAR Bilingual Teacher Cohort

ABSTRACT: This case study on nine bilingual teachers in Texas during their first year in a graduate education program examines both the development of critical consciousness among the educators and the ways in which critical consciousness shapes how these teachers come to understand their roles as teachers and leaders of a sociopolitically marginalized student group and community. Our analysis supports the proposition that teacher leadership programs can influence the development of social justice leadership, and it suggests that engaging teachers in certain types of structured learning opportunities can promote risk taking and a willingness to assume responsibility through the development of a sense of agency and efficacy.

In recent years, researchers have begun to pay more attention to teachers as school leaders. This emerging body of literature recognizes that leadership within a school is frequently distributed beyond the principal and assistant principal (Ogawa & Bossert, 1995) and that teachers are stepping into leadership roles, both formal and informal (York-Barr & Duke, 2004). Few scholars, however, have analyzed teacher leadership from a social justice perspective. Furthermore, there is little work in the literature examining bilingual teacher leadership specifically.

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Medium 9780253005939

17 I USED TO BE BAD.

Matthew Tully Indiana University Press ePub

 

 

Students and teachers returned from the two-week holiday break and quickly got to work on the second half of the year. Police resumed patrolling the halls, and administrators continued to prepare for the upcoming transfer of power at the top of the school’s leadership chain. In every way, Manual was back to being Manual. Still, the student population was diminished significantly from the first semester, as more than 10 percent of the school’s original roster of students had stopped coming or been kicked out. Many classes were now smaller, a clear sign of the city’s dropout epidemic. The only silver lining was that this had rid the school of some of its biggest troublemakers. That’s not much of a silver lining. Many of those kids were now out of school without a diploma, approaching adulthood with few options and setting examples for their younger siblings and their own children. At Manual the missing kids were like ghosts.

I walked into the building early on the first day of the new semester looking for new column ideas. I wanted to meet new students and teachers, to learn about other education issues and find columns that were different from the ones I had already written. Nonetheless, it was nice to see the old faces. Sergeant Barrow and the dean. Ms. H. and Ms. Winslow. And students such as Jammyra and Tricia, who were now only a few months away from graduating and heading off to college. Jammyra smiled and gave a loud customary huff, to underscore how busy she was, when I asked her how things were going one morning. She talked about the need to refocus on school. Her grades were still near the top at Manual, but she’d slipped a bit in the fall because of the many extracurricular activities she was involved in. She said she was now fighting a nasty case of senioritis. “I’ll fight through it,” she promised, and she did.

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Medium 9781475811957

Connecting Personal Change and Organizational Passage in the Transition From Teacher to Vice Principal

R&L Education ePub

DENISE E. ARMSTRONG

ABSTRACT: This article reports on the changes that 15 vice principals experienced in their transition from teaching to administration. In-depth interviews were used to explore the personal change process that occurred, and data were analyzed for recurring themes to create a composite picture of this transition process. The findings illustrate that the novice vice principals experienced an intense socioemotional transition as they crossed organizational and professional boundaries. Former teacher roles and identities were diminished, and administrative identities and perspectives were normalized. The participants identified mediating factors related to change and transition phenomena, vertical and horizontal organizational socialization impacts, and inadequate role training and support. A visual metaphor of transitional epicycles, or cycles within cycles, was used to map the novices’ experience of this transformational trajectory and their changes in perspective.

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Medium 9781475836783

Evaluating Implementation of the Early College Model Through a Theory of Change

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Evaluating Implementation of the Early College Model Through a Theory of Change

Ann Allen

J. Kessa Roberts

ABSTRACT: Early College is an initiative aimed at helping first-generation, minority, and low-income students access college courses while they are still in high school. Early College was one of the Race to the Top (RttT) initiatives funded in Ohio. Examining Early College through a change theory lens, we present findings from a two-year case study of Ohio’s Early College initiative as to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Early College as an innovation for low-performing schools. Findings from the two sites highlight both similarities and differences according to the context, mission, and vision of the leaders implementing the reform.

KEYWORDS: early college, reform implementation, theory of change, case study

A Early College (EC) is an initiative aimed at helping first-generation, minority and low-income students access college courses while they are still in high school. EC was one of the RttT initiatives funded as part of the Ohio Network of Education Transformation (ONET). This ONET evaluation (Stringfield et al., 2017) examined the implementation of EC in two Ohio school districts. Considering a theory of change, we present findings from a two-year case study of Ohio’s EC initiative pertaining to EC implementation opportunities and challenges for low-performing schools.

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Medium 9781475819151

Using a Web-Based Seminar for ExCET Preparation in a Predominantly Hispanic University Environment

R&L Education ePub

JONELLA J. KIMMEL AND CRISELDA G. GARCIA

ABSTRACT: In addition to acquiring an appropriate undergraduate degree and passing a subject area ExCET exam, preservice teachers in Texas are required to pass the Professional Development Examination for the Certification of Educators in Texas (ExCET PD) to become certified teachers. This study was designed to examine the effects of a 5-week WebCT online review seminar on practice ExCET PD exam scores of preservice teachers at a university in south Texas. Using a sample of 216 primarily Hispanic students, t-test results indicated within-group differences (p < .001) as well as between-group differences (p.05) existed. A description of the WebCT seminar and suggestions for further studies are provided.

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 marks a major transformation in public education. A key component of the new law is ensuring that all students are taught by “highly qualified teachers”: teachers who have both content knowledge of subjects taught and full state certification. According to the U.S. Department of Education Secretary’s Annual Report on Teacher Quality (2002), higher education institutions are still working toward aligning their certification programs with the federal requirements. The need for teacher education programs to successfully prepare numerous, competent, certified teachers remains a forefront concern.

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