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Appendix A: Standards for Mathematical Practice

Kanold, Timothy D. Solution Tree Press ePub

APPENDIX A

Standards for Mathematical Practice

Source: NGA & CCSSO, 2010, pp. 6–8. © 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students. These practices rest on important “processes and proficiencies” with longstanding importance in mathematics education. The first of these are the NCTM process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, representation, and connections. The second are the strands of mathematical proficiency specified in the National Research Council’s report Adding It Up: adaptive reasoning, strategic competence, conceptual understanding (comprehension of mathematical concepts, operations and relations), procedural fluency (skill in carrying out procedures flexibly, accurately, efficiently and appropriately), and productive disposition (habitual inclination to see mathematics as sensible, useful, and worthwhile, coupled with a belief in diligence and one’s own efficacy).

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Appendix D: Reproducibles for Lesson on Three-Dimensional Figures

r4Educated Solutions Solution Tree Press ePub

Appendix D

Reproducibles for Lesson on Three-Dimensional Figures

Who Am I?

Making Math Accessible to ELLs (K–2) © 2010 r4 Educated Solutions • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/ELL to download this page.

Cooperative Grouping Guide Cards

Making Math Accessible to ELLs (K–2) © 2010 r4 Educated Solutions • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/ELL to download this page.

Vocabulary Organizer

Making Math Accessible to ELLs (K–2) © 2010 r4 Educated Solutions • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/ELL to download this page.

Three-Dimensional Geometric Figures Cards

Making Math Accessible to ELLs (K–2) © 2010 r4 Educated Solutions • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/ELL to download this page.

Three-Dimensional Geometric Figures

Making Math Accessible to ELLs (K–2) © 2010 r4 Educated Solutions • solution-tree.com Visit go.solution-tree.com/ELL to download this page.

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5 Making the Grade

Phi Delta Kappa International Solution Tree Press ePub

The cartoons in this chapter highlight the travails of students making it through school, with special attention to report cards (listen for the groan), homework (louder groan), and graduation (woohoo!).

Readers of education history—or those who have simply lived long enough—will be quick to note that there’s not a lot of difference between today’s report cards and those that students carried home a century ago. It’s been said that if Thomas Edison came back from the grave, he wouldn’t recognize anything except the report card—and his report cards were no great shakes. Young Edison’s teachers considered him “addled,” and so his formal education was cut short, almost before it had begun. Yet little Thomas became a voracious reader, set up his first laboratory at age ten, and at twelve established a lab in an empty freight car on the Grand Trunk Railway. He also began printing a weekly newspaper, the Grand Trunk Herald.

This topic brings to mind a story about a little girl who asked, “Daddy, can you write in the dark?”

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Medium 9781475830569

Peer Coaching in Preservice Teacher Education: Different Approaches and Different Effects

Jenlink, Patrick M. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Different Approaches and Different Effects

YASAR BODUR AND KATHLEEN M. CRAWFORD

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of three different types of peer coaching on preservice teachers’ (PTs’) skills in analyzing classroom events, their perceptions of the value of giving and receiving peer feedback, and the quality of their peer coaching. Thirty-seven PTs in an early childhood education program engaged in structured, unstructured, or semistructured peer coaching and provided data that included a video analysis, a survey on attitudes toward peer coaching, and actual peer coaching notes. Analysis of the data indicated that using some form peer coaching was more effective than not using peer coaching. Among the peer coaching groups, the unstructured group produced the most positive results. Implications for PT education programs are presented.

Field experiences in preservice teacher (PT) education hold special importance. These experiences afford future teachers with the opportunity to bridge theory and practice and apply their learning in real classrooms. Perhaps more important, PTs view field experiences as the most influential aspect of their preparation for teaching. Therefore, it is in the best interest of all parties involved in teacher education to provide PTs with meaningful field experiences.

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The Impact of Isolation on the Job Satisfaction of New Principals

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP R&L Education ePub

SCOTT C. BAUER
S. DAVID BRAZER

ABSTRACT: Professional isolation has hampered the quality of the work experience for employees inside and outside public education for decades. This study explores the role that isolation plays in predicting the quality of the work experience among new principals. The analysis tests whether isolation serves as a mediator in the relationship between factors that are known to affect the quality of work life of principals (social support; role ambiguity, role conflict, and role overload; and participation in a structured coaching relationship) and the job satisfaction of new principals. Regression analysis shows that isolation fully mediates the relationship between social support and job satisfaction and partially mediates the relationship between role ambiguity and job satisfaction.

In recent years, many organizations have paid greater attention to professional isolation and the impact that this factor has on the quality of the employee’s work experience (e.g., Brook, Sawyer, & Rimm-Kaufman, 2007; Bunnell, 2006). Public schools have followed this trend by taking measures to reduce isolation among teachers (e.g., Cookson, 2005; Garmston, 2007). Both the existing literature and the practices of school districts clearly associate better outcomes with less teacher isolation (e.g., DuFour & Eaker, 1998; Fullan, 2001; McGrail, 2007; Schlechte, Yssel, & Merbler, 2005). In contrast, less attention has been paid to the impact of isolation on principals. Direct treatment of the subject can be found in only a handful of books and professional journal articles (Beaudoin & Taylor, 2004; Norton, 2003; Robbins & Alvey, 2003; Rooney, 2000), which have a tendency to not only frame isolation primarily as an outcome that reflects the quality of the principal’s work environment but also make recommendations based almost solely on the conclusions of research on teacher isolation (e.g., Beaudoin & Taylor, 2004; Rooney, 2000). The small body of existing literature on principal isolation lacks, for the most part, any direct study of this issue using a systematic research methodology (Beaudoin & Taylor, 2004; Norton, 2003; Painter, 2000; Zoul & Link, 2007). The systematic research studies that do directly address the topic of principal isolation have either assumed it as a negative factor in the life of the principal (e.g., Howard & Mallory, 2008) or only generally established its relationship with principals’ perceptions of their own effectiveness (e.g., Dussault & Thibodeau, 1997).

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